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327 

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For the Year Ending 
December 31, 1977 



FIRST MEETING HOUSE, WHICH APPEARS IN THE NATIONAL HISTORIC 
REGISTER, AS IT APPEARED IN 1653, 1789, AND 1874. 



Photo by Toby J. E. Reed 

THE MEETING HOUSE DURING THE MAY 1977 SNOW STORM WITH 
SNOW COVERING THE LILAC BLOSSOMS. 



327th Anniversary 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 
TOWN OFFICERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1977 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports1977medf 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Population as of January 1, 1977 
Assessed Valuation 1977: 
Tax Rate: 



1/1/77 - 6/30/77 
7/1/77 - 6/30/78 



10,353 

75,007,545,00 

61.70 
74.50 



Area: 14.43 Square Miles 

Miles of Highway: 61.77 

Elevation at Town Hall approximately 180 feet above mean sea level. 
Medfield is in the following Voting Districts: 



Representative to Congress 



Governor's Councillor 



State Senator 



State Representative 



United States Senators: 



Margaret M. Heckler 
30 Colburn Road 
Wellesley Hills, Ma. 

George F. Cronin, Jr. 
58 Cerdan Avenue 
Boston, Ma. 

David H. Locke 
15 Ordway Road 
Wellesley Hills, Ma. 

George R. Sprague 
5 Powder house Lane 
Sherborn, Ma. 

Edward W. Brooke 

J.F. Kennedy Memorial Building 

Boston, Ma. 

Edward M. Kennedy 

J.F. Kennedy Memorial Building 

Boston, Ma. 



ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OFFICERS 



Ralph C. Copeland 



MODERATOR 



Term Expires 
1978 



Nancy J. Preston 



Edward F. Barrett, Jr, 



Charles H. Rayner, Jr. 



R. Edward Beard 
William R. Reagan 
Sandra G. Munsey 



Melville J. Mills 
Joseph S. Kennedy 
Roger E. Hardy 



TOWN CLERK 



TREASURER 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



SELECTMEN 



ASSESSORS 



1979 



1978 



1980 



1978 
1979 
1980 



1978 
1979 
1980 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Phillip J. Burr 
John C. Rudisill 
Dawn I. Austin 
Darrel R. Bates 
Thomas McMurtrie 



1978 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1980 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Ann B. Thompson 

Mary Ellen Donahue, Resigned 

Kenneth F. Hunt * 

Jane M. Guthrie 

Martin Gottlieb 

Deborah L. Storrs 

John F. Wissler 

* elected to fill unexpired term 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1979 
1979 
1980 
1980 



PLANNING BOARD 



Term Expires 



Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 
Donald J. MacDonald 
C. Richard McCullough 
Robert J. Larkin 
Robert A. Kinsman 



Eric W. O'Brien 
John Nichols * 
Genie T. Roberts, Resigned 
Warren F. Sheard 
Richard DeSorgher 
William J. Heller 
Barbara F. Maliff 
Richard E. Nickerson 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 



* elected to fill unexpired term 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Raymond D. Cynewski 

James R. Ryan * 

Michael Tammero 

Dorothy Anastasi, Resigned 

Jane N. Kelly, State appointed 

Peter A. Gaines 



1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1979 
1979 
1980 
1980 



1978 
1978 
1979 
1980 
September 10, 1981 
1982 



* elected to fill unexpired term 

FIRE CHIEF 

Joseph E. Ryan 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

William H. Mann 

SERGEANTS 



E. Nina Iafolla 



George W. Kingsbury 



POLICE OFFICERS 



Anthony A. Bertone 
Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick W. Clancy 
John T. Garvey, Jr. 
Ronald E. Kerr 



Robert E. Naughton 
Robert B. Ripley 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
Raymond J. Wheeler 



PERMANENT INTERMITTENT PATROLMEN 



Patrick J. Caulfield 
Michael J. Cellucci 
Robert R. Grover 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

George E. Nye 

5 



Eileen F. O'Brien 
David S. Sloan 
Robert G.V. Taylor 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 



Michael J. Sullivan 



Term Expires 
1978 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS, WATER AND SEWER 



William E. McCarthy 



1978 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



Michael J. Sullivan 



1978 



TOWN COUNSEL 



Charles Fuller, Jr. 



1978 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Francis X. Curry 
Thomas A. Caragliano 
Richard H. Whelan 



1978 
1979 
1980 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Joseph A. Roberts 
Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 
Peter C. O'Brien 



1978 
1979 
1980 



WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 



Leland D. Beverage 

John D. Williams 

Bruce 0. Tobiasson 

John A. Rose, Jr., Associate Member 



1978 
1979 
1980 
1978 



SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 



Ellis N. Allen 



1978 



TREE WARDEN 



Ellis N. Allen 



1978 



Rebel L. Palumbo 
Frederick C. Perry 



FIELD DRIVERS AND FENCE VIEWERS 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



1978 
1978 



Wilbur M. Salter, D.V.M. 
William J. Jennette, Assistant 



1978 
1978 



POUND KEEPER Term Expires 

Roy Owen 1978 

DOG OFFICER 

William J. Jennette 1978 

Ruth S. Luke, Assistant 1978 

INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

Herbert B. Burr, Deceased 

Richard Ostrander, Interim Inspector of Buildings 

Rebel L. Palumbo, Local Inspector of Buildings 1978 

Frederick C. Perry, Local Inspector of Buildings 1978 

Walter R. Nye, Gas Inspector 1978 

George E. Nye, Assistant Gas Inspector 1978 

George E. Nye, Plumbing Inspector 1978 

Walter R. Nye, Assistant Plumbing Inspector 1978 

Joseph F. Erskine, Wiring Inspector 1978 

Thomas J. 0' Toole, Assistant Wiring Inspector 1978 

OFFICIAL GREETER OF THE TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

Joseph L. Marcionette 1978 

OFFICIAL KEEPER OF THE TOWN CLOCK 

Austin C. Buchanan 1978 

James R. Bassett, Assistant 1978 

Robert E. Kennedy, Assistant 1978 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Mary MairEtienne 1978 

Beatrice Bangs 1979 

John F. Ganley 1980 

VETERANS' DEPARTMENT 

Paul F. Curran, Director, Agent, Burial Agent 1978 

G. Marshall Chick, Graves Officer 1978 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Michael Tammero 1978 

MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 

J. Hardy Henderson 1978 

PUBLIC WEIGHER 

Richard A. Ellsworth 1978 



CONSTABLES AND KEEPERS OF THE LOCK UP 



Anthony A. Bertone 



Richard D 
Robert W. 
Patrick J 
Michael J 
Patrick W 
John T. Garvey 
Robert R. Grover 
E. Nina Iafolla 
Ronald E. Kerr 



Bishop 
Brady 
Caulfield, Jr. 
Cellucci 
Clancy 



George W. Kingsbury 
William H. Mann 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr, 
Robert E. Naughton 
Eileen F. O'Brien 
Robert B. Ripley 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
Robert G.V. Taylor 
Raymond J. Wheeler 



PROVISIONAL INTERMITTENT POLICE OFFICERS 



George W. Hinkley, III 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 



Robert D. Taylor 
Robert G.V. Taylor 



POLICE INTERNS 



Term Expires 



Michael J. Cellucci 
Robert I. Clodi, Resigned 
Kevin G. Glasheen 
Daniel J. Hutchinson 
Thomas King 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 
Leslie A. Morgan 



December 31, 1977 

December 31, 1977 

December 31, 1977 

December 31, 1977 

December 31, 1977 

December 31, 1977 

December 31, 1978 



TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS 



Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
Joyce F. Johnson 
Priscilla Mahoney 
Elisabeth T. Mann 
Mary T. Nyren 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Marie St. Pierre 
Mary L. Solar i 



June 


1978 


June 


1978 


June 


1978 


June 


1978 


June 


1978 


June 


1978 


June 


1978 


June 


1978 



POLICE MATRONS 



Jessie A. Erskine 
Elizabeth Hinkley 
Joyce F. Johnson 
Priscilla Mahoney 
Mary I. MairEtienne 



Elisabeth T. Mann 
Mary T. Nyren 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Marie E. St. Pierre 
Mary L. Solari 



HONORARY SPECIAL POLICE OFFICER 



William H. Bowman 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 



Albert Baima 
R. Edward Beard 
Bruce A. Berry 
Leo M. Brennan 
Albert R. Brown 
James Brown 
Chester A. Burks 



Herbert L. Burr 
James Campbell 
Richard Cant re 1 1 
William Carlson 
Herbert Cart- 
Edward Carre ite 
Joseph Carvahlo 



Special Police Officers Continued 



Michael J. Cellucci 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Mario R. Centamore, Jr.; 
Clinton M. Clark 
Joseph Concannon 
Kenneth W. Dunbar 
David C. Egy 
Robert Eklund 
Richard Ellsworth 
Jeffrey M. Farrell 
Dana P. Friend 
Kevin G. Glasheen 
Robert R. Grover 
Kenneth Hedderig 
George W. Hinkley, III 
Daniel J. Hutchinson 
John Holmes 
William J. Jennet te 
Samuel Johnston 
William D. Jones 
James T. Kashalena 
George Katapodis 
Timothy M. Kleczek 
John Kubacki 
Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr. 
Alfred Leverone 
Warren Maloney 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 
William Meau 



Hugh Mick 
George P. Michel 
Sandra G. Munsey 
Frank S. Newell, Jr. 
Eileen F. O'Brien 
Rebel L. Palumbo 
Mario Pederzini 
William R. Reagan 
Walter F. Reynolds, Jr 
Walter F. Reynolds, Sr 
David Riggs 
Warren L. Robinson 
Joel Rosenfeld 
Joseph E. Ryan 
Robert Sessa 
David M. Sexton 
Carl Sheridan 
George St. Pierre 
George E. Smith, Jr. 
Robert D. Taylor 
Robert G.V. Taylor 
J. Robert Tosi 
William Triefol 
John E. Varnum, Jr. 
Edmund Waitkevich 
Thomas Ward 
Thomas Watson 
Mark R. Wills 



Donald J. Bickel 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICER - BEN FRANKLIN SECURITY 

Ronald A. Taddeo 

SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS - CORNING GLASS 

John R. Geraghty 

SPECIAL POLICE OFFICER - ROCKY WOODS 

Joel Udsteun 



John Mortz 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS - SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



Allan K. Belcher 
Russell A. Devereau 
Tassos P. Filledes 
John T. Grover 
Vincent D. Hallowell 
Frank J. Hoffman 
Douglas Ide 

SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 



Howard L. Kilmer 
John McGrath 
James E. Morris 
James H. 
James W. 
Harold F 



Morris 
O'Connell 
Pritoni 



MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL 



Herbert Bennett 
Elwin Graves 
Joseph Harkins 
Donald H. Lee 
Edward Mahan 



William J. Marchand, Jr 
Robert McGrath 
Leo J. Prince 
John Walsh 





COUNCIL 


ON 


AGING 








Term Expires 


Dorothy Anastasi , Resigned 
















November 


16, 


1977 


Alison M. Ulrich 
















November 


16, 


1977 


Virginia Couper 
















November 


16, 


1978 


Barbara Fetteroll, Resigned 
















November 


16, 


1978 


Gertrude H. Ehnes * 
















November 


16, 


1978 


Genevieve K. Reagan 
















November 


16, 


1978 


Madeleine I. Harding 
















November 


16, 


1979 


Elizabeth L. Martin 
















November 


16, 


1979 


Thomas V. Sweeney, Sr. 
















November 


16, 


1979 


Charles F. Dyer 
















November 


16, 


1980 


Edwin C. Flaherty 




- 












November 


16, 


1980 


* appoin 


ted 


to f: 


ill 


unexpi 


red 


term 








BOARD OF APPEALS 


ON 


ZONING • 


- SUBDIVISION 


CONTROL 







James T. Regan, Resigned 

William F. McCarthy * 

William F. Spang, Resigned 

Charles H. Peck * 

Robert F. Sylvia 

Paul B. Rhuda, Associate Member 

Burgess P. Standley, Associate Member 

* appointed to fill unexpired term 



1978 
1978 
1979 
1979 
1980 
1978 
1978 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING ENFORCING OFFICER 



Thomas V. Sweeney, Jr 



1978 



BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS 



E. Paul Corkum 
Harry C. Merrow 
Philip Bonanno 
James J. Leonard 
Anthony C. Centore 



1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 



CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 



Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 
Fred W. Clarridge, Jr. 
Margaret C. Erdlen 
Lorraine G. Holland 
Allan J. Larkin 
Arthur G. Maguire 



William H. Mann 
William E. McCarthy 
Thomas V. Sweeney, Jr. 
Eleanor Anes, Associate 
George Basile, Associate 
Robert Larkin, Jr. Assoc, 



CHARLES RIVER WATERSHED PROJECT - MANAGEMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 
Harry A. Kelleher 



David W. Stephenson 



CHURCH STUDY COMMITTEE 
Thomas V. Sweeney, Jr. 
CIVIL SERVICE STUDY COMMITTEE 



Paul F. Valzania 



Richard D. Bishop 
Robert P. Ceresi, Resigned 
Clark D. Holland 
William H. Mann 



Kevin W. Robinson 
Paul F. Valzania 
Michael J. Sullivan, 



Ex officio 



10 



Mario Pederzini 



DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 



Term Expires; 
1978 



DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 



John E. Varnum, Jr, 



197; 



UNDERWATER RESCUE AND RECOVERY 



Kenneth E. Childs, Jr. 



1978 



SHELTER MANAGERS 



Ruth Gaffey 
Patricia Knowles 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Constance Waite 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. 



Merrick A. Counsell, Chief 
Steve Wood, Deputy Chief 



Michael J. Cellucci, Sergeant 
Robert, E. Meaney, Jr. Sergeant 
David M. Sexton, Sergeant 



DISPATCHER 



RADIO OFFICER 



RESCUE SQUAD 



1978 



1978 
1978 



1978 
1978 
1978 



CIVIL DEFENSE MESSENGER 
Donald A. Gottberg 



CIVIL DEFENSE AUXILIARY POLICE OFFICERS 



Mario Pederzini, Deputy Chief 



John E. •Varnum, Jr. , Captain 
Vincent M. Cellucci, Lieutenant 

Blair Belcher 
Bruce Berry 
Albert Brown 
Chester A. Burks 
Ralph Chadsey 
Dana P. Friend 
Ruth Gaffey 
Jonathan Gifford 
Kevin G. Glasheen 
Kenneth Hedderig 
Daniel J. Hutchinson 
William J. Jennette 
James T. Kashalena 
Timothy Kleczek 



Warren L. Robinson, Sergeant 
Robert J. Sessa, Sergeant 

Patricia Knowles 
Thomas LaPlante, Jr. 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. 
Garry Rowley 
Stephen P. Saulnier 
Edward Spita 
Herbert Talerman 
Robert Taylor 
Robert G.V. Taylor 
John E. Varnum, Sr. 
Armando R. Viera, Jr. 
Constance Waite 
Steve Wood 



11 



COMMUNITY GARDENS COMMITTEE 



Joan M. Bruno 
Gertrude H. Ehnes 
Ellen E. Gifford 
Doris E. Kellar 



William P. Mikelonij 
Roy Owen 
Mario Pederzini 
Linda F. Whichard 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Robert W. MacLeod 

Erwin A. Seidel 

William D. Walsh, Resigned 

Peyton C. March * 

Frederick D. Harrison 

Mario Pederzini 

Robert A. Kinsman, Resigned 

Hanson C. Robbins 

Tobey J.E. Reed 

Alden H. Pember, Associate Member, Resigned 

Richard W. Bryant, Associate Member 

John F. Guthrie, Jr., Associate Member 

Edmund P. Hammond, Associate Member 

David H. Martin, Associate Member 

* appointed to fill unexpired term 



Term Expires 

1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1979 
1979 
1980 
1980 
1980 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



George M. Graham, Jr. 
Norman A. Gray, Jr. 
Donald H. Harding 
William P. Mikelonis 
Paul E. Hinkley 
Truman W. Netherton 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1980 



DRAINAGE STUDY COMMITTEE 



Robert E. Kennedy 
Peyton C. March 
William E. McCarthy 



Paul F. Valzania 
James R. Woglum 



EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES RESPONSE COMMISSION 



William H. Mann 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 
Joseph E. Ryan 
James D. Sullivan, M.D. 



Eleanor Anes 
Ann S. Mentzer 
David L. Wilmarth 
Norman A. Gray, Jr. 
Laura H. Smith 
Burgess P. Standley 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Donald J. MacDonald, 
William E. McCarthy, 
William F. McCarthy, 



STORICAL COMMISSION 



Associate Member 
Associate Member 
Associate Member 



Roy A. McQuillan, Associate Member 
Thomas V. Sweeney, Jr., Associate Member 







1978 






1978 






1978 






1978 


June 


30, 


1978 


June 


30, 


1978 


June 


30, 


1978 


June 


30, 


1979 


June 


30, 


1979 


June 


30, 


1979 


June 


30, 


1980 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



12 



HISTORIC DISTRICT STUDY COMMISSION 



Ann M. Bray ton 
Carolyn B. Caragliano 
Leslie J. Howlett 



Robert S. Capers, Jr. 
Edward J. MacDonald 
Woolsey S. Conover, Jr. 



Donald J. MacDonald 
Henrietta M. Maloney 
Ann S. Mentzer 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



LANDFILL SITE SELECTION AND STUDY COMMITTEE 



Thomas A. Caragliano 
Harry A. Kelleher 
Donald J. MacDonald 
William E. McCarthy 
Elmer 0. Portmann 





Term Expires 






1978 






1979 


:ee 




1980 


Hanson 


C. 


Robbins 


George 


L. 


Robinson 


Steven 


M. 


Rudnick 


Michael J 


. Sullivan 


Albert 


T. 


Tray 



Michael J. Sullivan 



MEDFIELD DESIGNEE ADVISORY BOARD - MBTA 



MEDFIELD DESIGNEE - OUTDOOR ADVERTISING 



1978 



Thomas V. Sweeney, Jr 



Harry A. Kelleher 



Dawn I. Austin 
R. Edward Beard 
Robert A. Kinsman 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



OUTWARD BOUND COMMITTEE 



April 3, 1980 



Robert E. Naughton 
Eric O'Brien 
Joel Udstuen 



POLICE STATION STUDY COMMITTEE 



Charles W. Griffin, Resigned 
Marvin W. Kushner 
William H. Mann 



Thomas A. McGinnis 

Thomas V. Sweeney, Sr. 

Michael J. Sullivan, Ex officio 



REPRESENTATIVE TO SOUTHWEST AREA SELECTMEN'S COORDINATING COMMITTEE 

Sandra G. Munsey 



TRANSPORTATION CONSULTANT - BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Charles F. Cotton 



YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



Stephen Angelis 

Dawn I. Austin 

R. Edward Beard 

Laura L. Booth 

Kevin Brady 

Richard Desorgher 

Robert E. Naughton 

Rev. Paul E. Norcross 

Isabelle Rabe 

Kathleen Shiels 

Chester A. Burks, Jr., Associate 

John T. Garvey, Jr., Associate 



1978 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



13 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY BOARD OF HEALTH 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO THE OUTREACH PROGRAM 



Robert Cresto 
Marilyn R. Rossier 
Richard H. Whelan 



Term Expires 

1978 
1978 
1978 



INSPECTORS OF SANITATION 



William R. Domey 



John J. Keefe 



BOARD OF HEALTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Jean P. Clark 
Madeleine I. Harding 
Nancy C. Kashalena 



A. Ritchey Stagg, M.D. 
James D. Sullivan, M.D. 
Rev. Robert L. Wood 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY MODERATOR 



DEPUTY MODERATOR 



Tidal B. Henry 



1978 



WARRANT COMMITTEE 



Ralph C. Good, Jr. 


April 1, 1978 


William M. Heyer 


April 1, 1978 


Jane P. McCarty 


April 1, 1978 


Thomas E. Anastasi, Jr. 


April 1, 1979 


Ellen E. Gifford 


April 1, 1979 


Robert G. Stokes 


April 1, 1979 


Jeanne M. Bassett, Resigned 


April 1, 1980 


Richard M. Heiligmann * 


April 1, 1980 


James E. Loer 


April 1, 1980 


Elmer 0. Portmann 


April 1, 1980 


* appointed to fill unexpired term 




MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 





Philip J. Burr 
Charles W. Higgins 
Priscilla J. Mahoney 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



Robert P. Ceresi, Resigned 
Raymond L. Hildebrand * 
Loren G. Eaton, Resigned 
Clark D. Holland * 
Neal R. Olsen, Resigned 
Samuel H. Marcus * 

* appointed to fill unexpired term 



Sandra G. Munsey 
James F. Tubridy 



November 30, 1977 
November 30, 1977 



November 30, 
November 30, 



1978 
1978 



November 30, 1979 
November 30, 1979 



14 



SCHOOL PLANNING AND BUILDING COMMITTEE 



Robert S. Capers, Jr. 
David R. Iverson 
Maryellen M. Valzania 
Philip J. Burr 
Ralph A. Parmagiane 



Frank J. Cusack 



REGIONAL REFUSE DISPOSAL COMMITTEE 
Thomas J. Donovan 



Term Expires i 

April 1, 1977 
April 1, 1978 
April 1, 1978 
April 1, 1979 
April 1, 1979 



Steven M. Rudnick 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY PLANNING BOARD 



MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



Sandra Fitch 
Francis D. Rossi 
Robert N. Zabe 
Sars field Brennan 
Daniel V. Fritzsche 
Alexander J. Smith, Jr. 
Margaret E. Bancroft 
Lawrence Stiers 
Dorothy Sumner 



Term Expires 


June 


28, 


1978 


June 


28, 


1978 


June 


28, 


1978 


June 


28, 


1979 


June 


28, 


1979 


June 


28, 


1979 


June 


28, 


1980 


June 


28, 


1980 


June 


28, 


1980 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 



Henrietta Maloney 
Robert Zabe 
John K. Squires 
Roy C. Watson 
Donald H. Harding 
C. Richard McCullough 



January 15 , 
January 15 , 
January 15 , 
January 15 , 
January 15 , 
January 15 , 



1978 
1978 
1979 
1979 
1980 
1980 



15 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TAX COLLECTOR 



DEPUTY COLLECTORS 
Peter Bartkewicz Virginia F. Kinter Clarissa C. Supko 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY FIRE CHIEF 



Walter Reynolds, Jr., Deputy Fire Chief Walter B. Reynolds, Lieutenant 
Ellis N. Allen, Captain Charles G. Seavey, Lieutenant 

Clinton M. Clark, Lieutenant Mario Pederzini, Clerk 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN CLERK 



Marie M. Burke, Assistant Town Clerk 
Susan N. Thornton, Assistant Clerk 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TREASURER 

Charlotte R. Randolph Assistant Treasurer March 1978 

APPOINTED BY CHAIRMAN OF SELECTMEN, 

CHAIRMAN OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

and MODERATOR to 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Peter S. Howell June 30, 1980 



16 



DEPARTMENTAL 
REPORTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1977 



17 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Residents of Medfield: 

With the Bicentennial and the 325th Anniversary Celebrations behind, the 
Town started the year 1977 on a quiet note, continuing work on a variety of 
projects that would come to fruition during that time. However, 1977. was not 
about to fade in the shadow of its immediate predecessor. After a bitterly 
cold winter and a long anticipated spring, it wreaked it playful vengeamce 
on New England. 

On May 9th, during a Town Meeting session, the snow began falling and 
within a short period of time, it became apparent that this would be a major 
storm. Soon the lights went out at the Town Meeting and throughout the Town. 
Town Meeting attendees dutifully tried in vain to conclude the town's business 
under emergency lighting, and finally with the aid of flashlights and 
cigarette lighters. As the voters left the Dale Street Auditorium, they were 
engulfed by a driving, wet, and heavy snow and by the continual sounds of 
tree limbs snapping under the weight of the snow. By the time the storm ended 
the following day, leaving behind nine inches of snow, the extent of the 
damage was readily apparent. Trees and shrubs in full blossom could not bear 
the additional weight of the snow and limbs were down everywhere, taking 
utility lines with them and making many streets impassable. The northern 
section of the town was without power for three days. A State of Emergency 
was declared by vote of the Board of Selectmen. 

The day after the storm, the temperature was in the sixties and by week's 
end, only the mountains of brush lining the sides of every street and the un- 
usually beautiful photographs of lilac blossoms layered with snow gave 
evidence of this freak storm. Through the efforts of Ellis Allen and his 
tree crew, the highway crew, the fire department and Boston Edison crews from 
as far away as New York, power was restored and within a few weeks, the brush 
had been burned, chipped or buried. The year 1977, too, would be remembered 
in its own unique way. 

But most town business is carried out under less trying conditions and 
indeed, 1977 witnessed many accomplishments for the town. A summary of these 
accomplishments is reported below. For a more complete description, you 
should refer to the specific departmental reports. 

Organization of the Board 

After nine years as a member of the Board of Selectmen including seven 
as chairman, Harry A. Kelleher announced that he would not seek re-election 
to the Board. Harry leaves behind him, as testimony to his leadership and 
dedication to the service of the town, an impressive list of achievements, 
including the new town garage, the wastewater treatment plant, the Noon Hill 
conservation area, the relocated Route 27 and the sanitary landfill. In 
addition, through his service on the school building committee, he provided 
valuable advice on the building of the Ralph Wheelock School and the Junior 
High School. Though no longer a Selectman, he still renders valuable service 
to the town as its MAPC representative and as Selectmen's liaison to the 
Army Corps of Engineers Charles River Natural Valley Storage Project and also 



18 



as a member of the landfill study committee. In addition Harry serves the 
region as Treasurer of the MAPC and as a member of the Executive Board of the 
Norfolk County Selectmen* s Association. Truly it can be said that the town 
of Medfield is a better place to live because of Harry Kelleher's efforts. 

In March, Sandra G. Munsey was elected to the Board of Selectmen. Her 
election marks the first time in the town's history that a woman was chosen 
for that post. 

The Board reorganized on March 29th with William R. Reagan as chairman, 
R. Edward Beard as clerk, and Sandra G. Munsey as the third member. 

APPOINTMENTS . 

During the course of the year, the following were elected in conjunction 
with the Trustees of the Public Library to fill vacancies created by the 
resignations of elected Library Trustees: 

James Ryan elected to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of 
Dorothy N. Anastasi; and 

Kenneth F. Hunt elected to fill the vacancy created by the resignation 
of Mary Ellen Donahue. 

Three new committees were also established by the Board, namely the 
Drainage Committee to review and make recommendations on drainage throughout 
the town, the Outdoor Training and Development Committee to oversee a special 
CETA project grant, and the Civil Service Study Committee to review the town's 
participation in the Massachusetts Civil Service system. 

STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATION . 

In 1974, the national government mandated local government participation 
in the national unemployment insurance program and made local government 
employees eligible for benefits. Beginning January 1, 1978, the town will 
Jiave to pay the cost of unemployment benefits provided to its separated 
employees. The town was required by December 1, 1977 to select the method of 
payment it would utilize, i.e. per cent of payroll or direct reimbursement to 
che national government of actual incurred benefits. The latter method was 
chosen and starting in July 1978, the town will be billed quarterly. 

On the basis of a Supreme Court decision that found that an employer who 
denied sick leave benefits to a woman for maternity leave was not necessarily 
discriminating against her, the Selectmen voted to remove from the warrant 
such payments by the school department. The Selectmen completed an inter- 
rogatory submitted to it by the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimin- 
ation, but by year's end, no further word had been received on this matter. 

At the state level, petitions were circulated to urge the Governor and the 
General Court not to pass any legislation mandating programs on towns unless 
they also appropriated the funds to pay for these programs, to place the 
question of binding arbitration for police and firemen on the ballot, and to 
raise the legal age for purchase of alcoholic beverages from eighteen to 
twenty-one. At the Selectmen's request, Representative George R. Sprague 
filed proposed legislation which would require courts to assign an individual 
accused of a violent crime to a maximum security facility for pre-trial or 
pre-sentencing evaluation, if the court deemed such evaluation necessary. 



19 



PUBLIC SAFETY . 

The new Police Station on North Street was completed in September and 
formally dedicated on December 30th, at which time an open house was held for 
residents to tour the facility. On this occasion, the time capsule was 
buried outside the main door of the new station to be opened on July 4, 2075. 
The location of the time capsule is recorded at the Smithesonian Institute 
in Washington along with historical information and observations from the 
Town. The Police Station Building Committee is to be commended for their 
excellent job in overseeing the planning and construction of this new 
facility. 

During the year, precedent was broken twice in the police department, 
first by the appointment of Eileen O'Brien as the first female permanent 
intermittent police officer in the history of the department and then by the 
appointment of Leslie Morgan as the first female police intern under the 
Northeastern University Cooperative Education Program. 

In addition to Officer O'Brien, Officers Robert Grover, Robert Meaney, 
Michael Cellucci and Robert Taylor were appointed permanent intermittent 
police officers in June. In December, the Selectmen also appointed Patrick 
Caulfield as a permanent full time police officer. During the year, 
requisition for a sergeant's examination was sent to the Massachusetts 
Division of Personnel Administration and Officer Garvey was appointed patrol- 
man-detective. 

With funds appropriated by the 1977 Annual Town Meeting, a paging system 
was purchased for use by the fire and ambulance personnel. Ambulance 
personnel attended various EMT refresher courses in order to maintain their 
state certification. 

The Civil Defense and Auxiliary Police were reorganized with Mario 
Pederzini serving as both Civil Defense Director and Deputy Chief of the 
Auxiliary Police. 

MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL 

The Selectmen met several times with officials of the Department of 
Mental Health and the Department of Corrections to discuss alleged improp- 
rieties in the operation of the Medf ield-Norfolk Prison Program and to 
discuss the reported closing of the Medfield State Hospital. After 
negotiations with the Department of Corrections and the Department of Mental 
Health, the Town was offered the opportunity to appoint a local represent- 
ative to the Prison Project Screening Committee. At a meeting organized by 
Representative Sprague at the hospital, the approximately 500 persons in 
attendance were advised by Commissioner Robert L. Okin of the Massachusetts 
Department of Mental Health that the state had no plans under consideration 
to close the hospital. Developments on both of these matters were closely 
monitored by the town to assure that the interests of Medfield were represent- 
ed in all decisions. 

HIGHWAY 

The street reconstruction and resurfacing program continued under the 
able direction of Superintendent William E. McCarthy. The section of North 
Street between Main Street and Frairy Street was rebuilt and brought about 
a marked improvement in the appearance of our Central Business District, 
particularly in the vicinity of the First Parish Church where brick side- 
walks were installed. Future provisions for installation of old-fashioned 

20 



street lights were made. A portion of North Street from Farm Street to the 
Dover line was resurfaced and drainage improvements were made in several 
locations. During the fall, the long-awaited rubberized crossing was in- 
stalled at the Conrail grade crossing of Route 109 in the center. Following 
up on a bridge rating report, the Upper Bridge was posted for an eight-ton 
load limit and Superintendent McCarthy was directed to seek funding for a 
replacement bridge. The Selectmen also voted to request the state to pro- 
ceed with design plans for the reconstruction of South Street extension from 
Route 27 to the Norfolk line. 

WATER AND SEWER 

The Water and Sewer Board continued its sewerage program with the receipt 
of approximately $4,000,000. from state and federal agencies. Bids were 
opened in October for four separate contracts to sewer much of the town, 
south of Route 109. Construction will begin in 1978. 

Work continued on the development of the town's water system with test 
borings for new water sites and preliminary engineering on a new standpipe 
and water mains. The town adjusted to the new testing and reporting require- 
ments of the Federal Clean Water Act. 

Thomas Caragliano and Peyton March were appointed to serve as Medfield's 
representatives to the Mid-Charles Sewerage Site Selection Study Committee 
and provided valuable input to the deliberations. Medfield dissented from 
this committee's report that the plant be located in Dedham as Dedham had not 
been consulted prior to the issuance of the report. Questions were also 
raised as to the necessity for river flow augmentation and the effect of 
sewering on ground water supplies. 

LANDFILL 

The May special town meeting approved the recommendations of the landfill 
study committee and authorized the acquisition of two parcels of land be- 
tween Grove Street and Route 27, the abandonment of a portion of Grove Street, 
and the relocation of water lines. These actions will allow the town to con- 
tinue the landfill operation at the present site for another decade. At the 
end of the year, the town was awaiting final approval of operational plans 
from the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Management. The Landfill 
Committee developed a solution which will save the town many thousands of 
dollars; had the town been forced to go to a method of disposal other than 
landfill, costs for this service would have risen sharply. 

CONSERVATION & RECREATION 

In December, the last of the parcels scheduled for acquisition in the 
Noon Hill conservation area was acquired, thus assuring preservation of this 
unique resource for future generations. In addition, the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers began acquisition of 8,500 acres of flood plain for the Charles 
River Flood Control Project. Approximately 1200 acres of this land is in 
Medfield, along the Charles and Stop Rivers. At the request of the Town of 
Medfield, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council was invited to participate 
in a management study of the project to determine how the land to be acquired 
could best be controlled. The Army Corps, Trustees of Reservations, the 
Audubon 8ciety, the Charles River Watershed Association and the affected 
towns participated in this study. A preliminary report recommended manage- 
ment of the area by the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries & Wildlife. This 
project represents a first in the nation's effort to acquire flood plain for 



21 



water storage rather than to build storage facilities. Medfield can be proud 
to have played such an important role in its implementation. 

Utilizing a CETA Title VI special project grant, the town in conjunction 
with the Trustees of Reservations initiated and implemented an outdoor train- 
ing and development program and built an obstacle course in the Noon Hill 
reservation. With the cooperation of the Conservation Commission, the School 
Department, and the Park & Recreation Commission, the program has offered high; 
school students a unique outdoor experience. 

The federal government continued flood plain mapping and intermediate 
flood plain maps of the Town were expected to be available in 1978. This map- 
ping is part of the federal flood insurance program. 

AUDIT OF TOWN RECORDS 

An audit of the Town for the period July 1, 1974 to May 22, 1976 was 
completed by the Bureau of Accounts and the report was received in December. 
Under the new revenue sharing regulations, the town must have an outside audit 
of its books completed by December 31, 1979 in order to remain eligible to 
receive revenue sharing funds. 

TOWN MEETING QUORUM 

The lack of a quorum at the fall Special Town Meeting generated consider- 
able discussion about the present quorum requirement of two hundred and fifty. 
While there was widespread concern over this demonstration of voter apathy, 
the proposed solutions varied considerably. Some suggested eliminating the 
quorum requirement altogether, others reducing it to one hundred, and still 
others keeping it at the present level or tying it to a percentage of reg- 
istered voters. It is disappointing to town officials, many of whom volunteer 
their time and talents, when their efforts are ignored by the voting public. 
If town government is to remain the last vestige of "pure democracy", then 
it will require considerably more effort from the citizens of Medfield. 

SPECIAL TRIBUTE 

During the course of the year, the Selectmen had occasion to pay tribute 
to the efforts of several individuals on behalf of the town, to accept 
donations from various groups for a variety of town programs, and to issue 
proclamations in commemoration of events or individuals of particular local 
significance . 

To those so honored and to those who contributed in any way to the im- 
provement of Medfield, the members of the Board of Selectmen extend their 
sincere appreciation. 

CONCLUSION 

The government of Medfield is made up in part by a large number of citizen 
volunteers who dedicate considerable amounts of time and talent addressing the 
numerous issued facing the town and in part by the paid employees who im- 
plement these policy decisions. In both instances, Medfield is extremely 
fortunate in the caliber and dedication of these individuals. But perhaps 
what is more important is the spirit of cooperation and the interchange of 
Ideas that flow between these two groups. Medfield offers its citizens a 
unique opportunity to participate in their government to affect change, and 
to implement creative solutions to improve the town. Most of the accomplish- 
ments cited above were initiated or evolved from this volunteer participation 



22 



in town government. Those who have taken part in this process have the 
satisfaction of their own achievements to enjoy. To those who have not yet 
volunteered, your participation is sincerely invited, for in Medfield, your 
vote and your participation can make a difference. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WWUam, R. Reagan, Chairman 
R. EduoaAd BzaAd, Clerk 
Sand/m G. MunAzy, Selectman 




FIRST WOMAN SELECTMAN, SANDRA G. MUNSEY, IS SWORN TO OFFICE 

Photo by Toby J. E. Reed 




SELECTMEN WILLIAM R. REAGAN, R. EDWARD BEARD & SANDRA G. MUNSEY 

Photo by Tobey J. E. Reed 



23 



NORTH STREET RECONSTRUCTION 




Photos by Toby J. E. Reed 



24 



THE SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS, 
WATER AND SEWER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Citizens of Medfield: 

Herewith is respectfully submitted the Annual Report concerning the 
several departments entrusted to me. 

SNOW: In recent years the total yearly snow accumulation has been below 
normal — 9% inches in 1973, 31 inches in 1974 and 39% inches in 1975. Con- 
sequently, budgets were adjusted downward. The Winter of 1976-77 was more 
normal with an accumulation of 72% inches and cost more than the last few 
winters. The Street Department plows the five schools, Housing for the Elder- 
ly, water wells, Wastewater Treatment Plant and the Cemetery. 

Last winter started early but the Spring of 1977 came early; foliage on 
trees returned two weeks early. On May 9, 1977 a heavy wet snow fell during 
the day, but there was little concern because it melted on the streets as it 
fell and weather forecasts continued to predict that it would change to rain. 
When the lights went out at the Town Meeting, which was in progress at the 
Dale Street School, and the use of flashlights proved futile, the meeting was 
adjourned. It was then realized that a major storm was in progress. The 
seriousness was not realized until later. The 9 inch accumulation of wet snow 
on newly budded trees and shrubs caused many to break. Plowing during the 
night was difficult because of many downed live wires. Some areas of the Town 
were without power for several days. The Boston Edison worked long hours to 
restore power to the Town. When daylight came, the damage to trees along the 
public ways and on private properties became evident. Because of the enormity 
of the task for the individual property owners and because it would be diffi- 
cult to handle the brush at the Landfill when brought in by individuals, the 
Selectmen declared a state of emergency and voted that the Town departments 
pick up the brush. Town employees worked until dark each day and seven days 
a week to clean up the brush from the storm. 

SALT STORAGE: When the Town departments were located under the Town Hall, 
there was a shed in the rear that was used for the storage of salt. When the 
garage was moved to its present location it was necessary to store salt in the 
open. Although attempts are made to cover the salt, it is unsatisfactory and 
some runoff flows into the nearby swamp. It was the intention to ask for funds 
at the 1978 Town Meeting for a salt storage shed. Chapter 356 of the Acts of 
1977, which was a major bond issue for the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Works, includes a million dollars for salt sheds for municipalities. Medfield 
applied and was one of the twenty-eight towns selected. The Town will be 
required to pay for the floor and the lighting. It is expected that by next 
winter, salt will be stored inside the new building. 

To further reduce the use of salt for street maintenance, two new plows 
will be requested this year. The plow will fit underneath the truck rather 
than as conventionally in front of the truck. This new operation will permit 
plowing snow from the street as the same truck deposits salt on the roadway 
from the rear, thus reducing the amount of salt needed. Reducing the salt 
needed will reduce the costs, but more importantly there will be less impact 
on the Town water supply and every effort must be made to preserve the quality 

25 



of drinking water. 

LANDFILL: A committee appointed by the Selectmen has been working for 
over two years to develop additional space for refuse disposal. Funds have 
been appropriated, land purchased and all local hearings have been held. The 
Department of Environmental Quality Engineering has requested that information 
be obtained from the Shell Oil Company concerning any impact that the new 
operation will have on its high pressure transmission line which runs through 
the site. It is expected that this matter will be resolved in the near future. 
In the Spring, the remainder of site work will be completed. Grove Street 
from West Street to the Legion Post has been renamed by the Board of Selectmen 
as Peter Kristof Way in memory of a young man who gave his life in Vietnam. 

UPPER BRIDGE: The Historical Commission recommended, and the Town voted 
in 1977, to rename Town bridges. The bridge on Forest Road, Millis and Orchard 
Street, Medfield was officially named Upper Bridge because that was its origin- 
al name. The Town of Millis concurred with the designation. The two towns 
also agreed to rate the bridge in accordance with Chapter 851 of the Acts of 
1974. 

In the Fall of 1977, the report was received from the consultant and it 
recommended that this 1927 bridge be restricted to 8 tons and, because of the 
deterioration, no consideration be given to its repair, but that the construc- 
tion of a new bridge is the solution. Officials of the two towns met at the 
bridge and decided to consult the Bridge Engineer of District 6 of the Massa- 
chusetts Department of Public Works and the County Engineer as to the adequacy 
of the present layout for a new bridge and as to procedure for obtaining State 
participation for a new bridge. The Bridge Engineer considers the approaches 
within the existing layout sufficient. The only additional layout that would 
be required would be at the structure itself to accommodate the wing walls and 
that would be determined at the time of design. 

The cost for such a bridge would be between $500,000 - $600,000 and is 
the responsibility of the two towns. By a 1945 Act, bridges over route roads 
can be considered as State highways for the purpose of construction of the 
bridge and then returned to the local system, but Orchard Street is not a 
route road. Orchard Street is not on any Federal Highway system. There may 
be a possibility of obtaining funds through a Federal Program entitled 
Federal Aid Safer Off System Road Funds. In the event that there are funds, 
the further obstacle is that there is not sufficient "in house" personnel 
within the District to do the design work. If the towns appropriate the funds 
for designing the bridge, there will be a greater opportunity of obtaining 
Federal funds for this purpose. 

The State has reviewed the excellent report by Gilbert Small & Co., Inc., 
the consultants, and the accompanying photographs, and they are concerned with 
the state of deterioration. They advised a yearly review of the condition of 
the bridge. 

It takes many years to replace a bridge because of funding, design and 
environmental review. Before a new bridge is in place chances are that weight 
limitations of the present structure will be further reduced and possibly the 
bridge closed. 



26 



SEWER: During the past year, 52 additional connections were made to the 
system. During the coming fiscal year the installation of street sewers in 
the southerly area of Town will add more connections to the system. 

The Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant was selected by Environmental 
Protection Agency and Lowell University for a septage monitoring study. Cost 
analysis will be provided the Town when it has been completed. 

Although there has been a complete turnover of Plant personnel, the high 
quality of employees has been maintained. Inspections by State and Federal 
officials result in praise for compliance with standards and the condition of 
the Plant. 

Interceptors and street mains are patrolled to check on any blockage. 
The program for cleaning older mains continues. 

WATER: The Interim Clean Waters Act went into effect in June of 1977. 
Twice each month 7 samples must be tested for bacteria. 

In order to utilize land for the site of the new Landfill, Grove Street 
from Route 27 to the Legion Post was abandoned. Public water was supplied to 
the West Street area by a main in Grove Street that will be removed. To 
supply the area the 12 inch main in West Mill Street was continued to West 
Street. The installation was done by Town forces under the direction of 
Charles Evans, Foreman of the Water Department. A short section of 12 inch 
main west of Route 27 was installed to meet the 12 inch main installed in 
West Street by A. J. Lane. The water supply in this area of Town has been 
improved by these several installations and makes available any supply needed 
by business or industry that might elect to locate in the industrial area. 
Another loop between Harding Street and Adams Street on West Street was closed 
by Town forces this past year. 

STREET DEPARTMENT: In the 1977-78 budget, the cost of repairing and 
maintaining equipment was eliminated from the A110-04 Account and a new 
account established for equipment repair. The new account assures that all of 
the funds appropriated in the regular Highway Account will be applied to 
street maintenance. Last summer, 14,000 gallons of road oil were used as 
against 5,800 gallons in 1976. 

The establishment of an account for equipment repairs provides for better 
departmental management and better review by the Warrant Committee. 

DRAINAGE: Article 44 of the Annual Town Meeting was a petition for the 
correction of a drainage problem on Bridge Street; the work was completed under 
the direction of Robert Kennedy, Foreman, last fall. 

Article 17 of the Special Town Meeting of April 26, 1977 provided for 
correction of a drainage problem on Forest Street which was completed last 

summer. 

NORTH STREET RESURFACING: The volume of traffic on North Street exceeds 
traffic at comparative points on Route 27. It is a gravel penetrated road 
built to accommodate the traffic of the 1920's and 1930's. In 1977, one inch 
of hot top was spread between the Dover Town line and Farm Street. In 1978, 
it is proposed to continue southerly as far as Harding Street. 



27 



NORTH STREET RECONSTRUCTION: With State Aid funds, North Street was 
reconstructed and widened between Main Street and Frairy Street. The ancient 
stone culvert that has collapsed several times was replaced, assuring that 
water won't back up into the industrial area in the event of another flood. 
The inadequate 19th Century drainage system was replaced with a modern system 
which provides access in the event the system becomes plugged. After all 
underground utilities were replaced, a permanent surface was installed. 
Conduits were installed under the new sidewalks in the event the Town wishes to 
provide for old-fashioned street lamps. 

The plan originally was to construct all of the way to Green Street but 
because it would take so long to accumulate sufficient funds, inflation would 
erode them. Also, it was believed that the street sewer would be installed 
under Phase 2 of the Sewer Program. However, Phase 2 was not granted. The 
construction of North Street between Frairy Street and Green Street will have 
to wait until the sewer is first installed. Because of compaction problems, 
the street should be allowed to settle for about three years before construc- 
tion takes place. 

Meanwhile, there are important arterial streets which carry heavy volumes 
of traffic and which have less surface than the most insignificant subdivision 
street. Therefore, it is planned to use 1977-78 State Aid Funds for resurfac- 
ing South Street between High Street (Route 27) and the Norfolk Town line. 
Before the surface is applied, several drainage problems will be corrected 
and leveling courses applied. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank Nancy Franke and Gertrude Simpson for all 
of their patience and assistance during the past year. Robert Kennedy, 
Foreman of the Street Department, Charles Evans, Foreman of the Water and 
Sewer Department, and Kenneth Feeney, Operator- in-Charge of the Wastewater 
Treatment Plant, are dedicated employees who make the Town services function; 
it is a pleasure to work with them. The Selectmen's Office, through Pauline 
Goucher and Michael Sullivan, cooperate and assist the several departments 
and their help is appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

tyZJUUxm E, McCa/itky, Superintendent 
STREETS, WATER AND SEWER 




Main Street at the Charles in Yesteryear 
28 



THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my seventh annual report as Chief, for the year ending 
December 31, 1977. 

As of February 28, 1977, Captain Frederick Rogers retired from the fire 
service after serving the Town of Medfield faithfully for thirty-six years. 
Ellis Allen was promoted to the rank of captain and Charles Seavey was pro- 
moted to the rank of lieutenant. Both promotions became effective on March 
1, 1977. I appointed Robert Grover to the department on March 1, 1977. 

During the year the firefighters attended regular drills and several 
firefighters attended special courses sponsored by the Massachusetts Fire- 
fighting Academy. Two firefighters have enrolled at the Massachusetts Bay 
Community College to study Fire Sciences, Lt. Seavey and Firefighter Carriero, 

In May, we were happy to receive and place into service the Jaws of Life 
rescue tool. The officers and men have been thoroughly trained in the use of 
this very valuable piece of equipment. In June of this year we placed in 
service our new Mack 1,000 gallon pumper. 

During the year I inspected the schools, businesses, and inspected the 
nursing home quarterly. The inspections have increased. Due to the energy 
problem, many people are installing solid burning stoves in their homes. 
These must also be inspected for the residents' safety. 

I attended numerous meetings and seminars sponsored by the state, 
enabling me to keep abreast of all new laws and improvements in the fire 
service. 

I implore the citizens of the community to make sure that their homes 
are clearly marked with their appropriate house numbers. It has become in- 
creasingly difficult to find certain homes, when people call for an emergency, 

We presented an honorary Fireman's badge to Arthur L. Farrar during the 
year, in recognition of the time he has given to our department. Again this 
year, we ran a successful barbecue and muster. 

I wish to thank the officers and men of the department for their 
cooperation and deep dedication to the citizens of the town throughout the 
year. I thank the Police department, the building, gas, and electrical in- 
spectors for their cooperation throughout 1977. 

I wish to express my appreciation to Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. for the 
many hours that he has volunteered in doing the clerical and dispatching 
duties throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J06Z.pk E. Ryan, Fire Chief 
29 



Services rendered for the year ending December 31, 1977 

Buildings 17 

Grass & Brush 97 

Automobiles 23 

Rubbish 13 

Gasoline Washdowns 6 

Highway Accidents 6 

Electrical 19 

Investigations 67 

Oil or Gas Burners - 12 

Mutual Aid 9 

Outside Assistance 4 

Accidental Alarms 26 

Chimneys 4 

Searches 3 

Disaster Drills 1 

Ammunition Permits 1 

Outdoor Burning Permits 225 

Outdoor Cooking Permits 3 

Black Powder Permits 2 

Oil Storage Permits 77 

Home Fire Alarm Inspections 125 

Lock Outs 3 

Water Problems 23 

Bomb Scares 1 

Pumping Cellars 14 

Box Alarms 170 

Still Alarms 252 

False Alarms 23 

Station Duty 17 

Landfill Area 2 

Televisions 3 

Rescues 5 

Ovens 18 

Details 8 

Fence 3 

Marshal Reports 34 

Smokeless Powder 2 

Model Rocket Permits 16 

Duplicating Fluid 5 

Blasting Permits t 11 

Inspections 107 

Propane Gas Permits 6 



30 







DEMONSTRATION OF JAWS OF LIFE 



Photo by Ann Thompson 

I r m a, 
B f 




FIREMEN'S MUSTER - SEPTEMBER 1977 

Photo by Toby J. E. Reed 




FIREFIGHTERS IN ACTION 



Photo by Ann Thompson 



31 



THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my annual report for the police department for the year 
ending December 31, 1977. 

PERSONNEL 

Five permanent intermittent officers were appointed June 14th; Robert E. 
Meaney, Jr., Robert G.V. Taylor, Michael J. Cellucci, Robert R. Grover, and 
our first female, Eileen O'Brien, all of Medfield. They worked many hours 
supplementing the regular officers and filling in when needed. On December 
13th, Patrick J. Caulfield of Norwood was appointed as a full time officer 
after serving as a permanent intermittent since December 1974. He will be- 
gin full time duty in January 1978. 

This year we used experienced interns for most of the time; Kevin 
Glasheen, Dedham, Daniel Hutchinson, Waltham, Michael Cellucci, and Robert E. 
Meaney, Jr. of Medfield worked, splitting up the duties of the three 
positions since July 1st. Thomas King of West Newton worked from January 
through March also. We used two interns until July 1 and added the third 
position for fiscal 1978. Our first female intern, Leslie Morgan of Medfield, 
was appointed in December. The 1977 annual town meeting also voted to add 
a third Sergeant to the force. An examination was requested but has not 
been held as yet. 

TRAINING 

Robert Naughton and Anthony Bertone completed basic police school at 
Quincy Police Academy. Officers Clancy and Brady attended child abuse 
seminars. 

Officer Raymond Wheeler has completed training as a dog handler and our 
police dog, Jerry, has received a certificate for completion of training in 
handler protection, searching and tracking. During 1977 about 150 hours 
training was received from Mr. Benson of Walpole and the Boston Police Canine 
Academy. The training was conducted in all types of weather and in all types 
of situations, both night and day. 

Officer Wheeler and Jerry have been used several times for building 
searches and tracking. Jerry was donated to the police department in 1976 by 
the Kelly family, Dale St., Medfield, through the Animal Humane Society. The 
society also paid for some veterinary care and the training done in Walpole. 
I wish to thank the Kellys, Kinsmans, Lukes, and members of the Humane 
Society for their help in adding a very valuable service to the department 
and to the town. 



32 



CRIME AND INVESTIGATIONS 

Crime did not rise during 1977. The noticeable reduction is in breaking 
and entering, from 100 in 1976 to 68 in 1977. Most other crimes stayed in 
the same general numbers or reduced slightly. I attribute this to two main 
factors, increased foot and cruiser patrolling, and intensive investigations. 
With the added personnel hired in 1977 and use of auxiliaries as well as 
additional summer help, we added about 60 or more hours of cruiser patrol 
each week. We also added about 50 hours of foot patrol per week. 

On June 28, 1977 Officer John T. Garvey was named Police Detective, the 
first on the Medfield Police Department. He has been doing investigative 
work for several years and the change in job title has helped to increase his 
effectiveness. 

During 1977 he worked on 309 investigations, resulting in the solution of 
63 which resulted in recovery of about $14,000 in goods and $3,200 in 
restitution. 

We had an armed robbery on April 29th. Quick work by Officer Robert 
Roy resulted in the recovery of the gun, and several clues discovered im- 
mediately, allowing an investigation to commence by Detective Garvey, Sgt. 
Kingsbury, Officer Bishop and Officer Naughton. Two persons were arrested a 
short time later by Sgt. Kingsbury and Auxiliary Officers Kleczek and Brown. 
They were taken to court and indicted by the Grand Jury. The incident 
occurred at a busy shopping time at the Nine to Nine Market and no one was 
hurt, although shots were fired. Officer Roy handled himself as a true pro- 
fessional with proper regard for the public's safety at great risk to his own 
personal safety. Intermittent Officer Grover, Selectman Reagan, and several 
citizens gave help at once also, which was greatly appreciated. 

On May 18th, we had a kidnapping and attempted rape which was solved 
quickly through quick work by Officers Clancy, Robinson and Kerr and help 
from the Westwood, MDC, and Boston Police. Officer Kerr had the suspect in 
custody about one hour after the incident. 

Both of the aforementioned cases were brought to the Grand Jury and in- 
dicted within one week and brought to trial in less than two months by use of 
a newly formed violent crimes section of the Norfolk District Attorney's 
office. 

Officers Naughton and Bertone have done most of the photography for the 
department which is a necessary tool for police investigations. Pictures 
taken included: 

Accident Scenes 106 

Crime Scenes 365 

For Other Departments 113 

Personal Photos (arrests etc.) 118 

We utilized the diversion program in lieu of court action in several cases 
involving teenagers that had committed acts of vandalism, thefts, and break- 
ing and entering. Eight persons were placed in the program and made 
restitution and received counseling and worked in some public service. Out- 
reach wbrker, Isabel Rabe, has been extremely helpful on the diversion pro- 
gram as well as on several other instances where the police department were 
involved in rape investigations, runaway cases, and family matters. Many of 
the cases resulted in successful rehabilitation of youngsters and wouldn't 



33 



have been possible without her help. 

NEW STATION AND EQUIPMENT 

On September 16th, we made the big move from the town hall to our new 
police station at 110 North Street. While we were happy to move into a new 
facility, we had many unusual and unexpected things happen during and since 
we moved. There were not enough electrical outlets in the alarm room and 
communication room; our generator hadn't arrived, and the old one didn't 
automatically supply electricity when we had a failure; the heating system 
did not supply an even heat. Most "of these things have since been corrected. 
We will add another CCTV unit soon and I hope, and with a little assistance, 
we will be able to open the dark room for use by the photographers. 

Cleaning the building has been a problem as well as heating. We also 
need to erect another sign or correct the lighting so the building can be 
seen by passing motorists. 

The official ribbon-cutting ceremony was held on December 30th, attended 
by many townspeople, and officials. I wish to thank the building committee 
and Selectmen, Mike Sullivan, and Pauline Goucher, for all their assistance 
in making the new station a reality. Thanks also to Ellis Allen and crew, 
the Medfield Garden Club, the Spade & Hoe Garden Club, and Corning Medical 
for their efforts in planting to beautify the exterior. 

The plants sent by Mrs. Luke and the town hall employees certainly helped 
to beautify the interior, and the highway department personnel did a great 
job painting inside. 

We had no major breakdowns of equipment during 1977, but we had many re- 
pairs to our radio equipment and I am again asking for additional money to 
replace old radios. We also had many repairs to our traffic lights, which is 
very costly. We now have five intersections controlled by traffic lights and 
will have many expenses each year for maintenance and repairs of damages. 

I was very dissatisfied with the performance of the contractor hired to 
do the traffic markings and I hope some of it can be corrected in the spring. 

I wish to express my thanks to the Board of Selectmen, also Town Hall 
employees and other town department personnel for their assistance throughout 
the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WlUMun H. Mann 
Chief 



34 




NEW PERMANENT INTERMITTENT POLICE OFFICERS REPEAT THEIR OATHS OF OFFICE 
Robert R. Grover, Robert E. Meaney, Jr., Michael J. Celluci, 
Eileen F. O'Brien & Robert G. V. Taylor 

Photo by Ann Thompson 




TIME CAPSULE LOWERED INTO PLACE AT POLICE STATION 

Photo by Robert Naughton 




SERGEANT GEORGE W. KINGSBURY DISPATCHES FROM NEW POLICE STATION 

Photo by Toby J . E. Reed 



35 



Statistics for the year 1977 are as follows : 

Accidents Reported 266 

Personal injuries 28 

Fatalities 3 

Ambulance Trips 281 

Arrests 72 

Arson 14 
Assistance to: 

Other Departments 297 

Motorists 320 

General 579 
Automobiles 

Reported Stolen 28 

Stolen Vehicles recovered 32 

Citations Issued 546 

Bomb Scares 2 

Breaking and Entering 68 

Attempted 28 

Burglar Alarms Answered 598 

Civil Matters & Family Problems 75 

Closed Homes Checked 274 

Court Attendance 208 

Disturbances 12 

Emergency Calls 222 

Fires Responded to by Police 135 

Doors Found Unlocked or Open 127 

Windows Found i Unlocked or Open 23 

Drunks Held in Protective Custody 57 

Funeral Escorts 27 

Indecent Exposures & Accostings 10 

Investigations of Miscellaneous Complaints 1,707 

Larceny 230 

Under $50.00 75 

Over $50.00 88 

Bicycles 32 

Motor Vehicles 28 

Shoplifting 7 

Attempted Larceny 16 

Lost Children Reported 12 

Lost Children Found by Police 10 

Malicious Destruction of Property 240 

Missing Patients Reported by State Hospital 102 

Missing Patients Returned by Police 27 

Missing Persons Reported 40 

Missing Persons Located by Police 10 

Messages Delivered 30 

Permits Issued 

Gunsmith 1 

Ammunition Dealer 2 

Firearms Dealer 2 
Firearms Identification Cards 60 

Pistol Permits 66 

Bicycles Registered 81 

Stolen Bicycles Recovered 14 

Property Reported Lost 46 

Property Found 90 

Prowlers 31 

Rape & Attempted Rape 2 



36 



Summons Served 
Suspicious: 

Motor Vehicles 

Persons 

Phone Calls 
False Alarms Investigated 
Sudden Deaths Investigated 



180 

160 

131 

32 

19 

10 



BREAKDOWN OF DETECTIVE ACTIVITY 



Breaking & Entering (homes) 
Breaking & Entering (businesses) 
Arson & Attempted Arson 
Larceny 

Narcotic Drug Violations 
Rape & Assault w/ Intent to Rape 
Sex Offenses, Other 
Obscene or Threatening Phone Calls 
Armed Robbery 
Auto Theft 
Forgery & Uttering 
Assault & Battery 
Bomb Threats/Fire Alarms 
Malicious Destruction 
Receiving Stolen Property 
Liquor Violations 

Contributing to Delinquency of Minor 
Suspicious Persons or Activity 
Extortion 

Blue Law Violations 
Insurance Fraud 

Fireworks & Smoke Bomb Violations 
Mail Theft 
Obscene Literature 
Leaving the Scene Accidents 
Kidnapping 
Family Problems 
Runaways 

False Prescriptions 
Background Investigations: 
For Municipal Agencies 
Assistance to other Police Departments 
Accidents 
Miscellaneous 

TOTAL 



Cases Investigated 


Cases Closed 


46 


13 


14 


3 


9 


1 


39 


8 


40 


7 


3 


1 


12 


4 


3 




2 




12 


3 


20 


8 


6 


1 


2 




18 


2 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 




9 




1 




1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


2 


8 


7 


1 


1 


4 


2 


1 




8 




4 




1 




9 




19 




3 




4 


2 



309 



70 



Crime Prevention, Safety, Police Career & Rape Education 



27 



37 




Photo by Toby J. E. Reed 




SELECTMAN WILLIAM R. REAGAN CUTS THE RIBBON AT OFFICIAL 
OPENING OF THE NEW POLICE STATION 

Photo by Ann Thompson 



38 



REPORT OF THE POLICE STATION 
STUDY COMMITTEE 



The construction of the new Medfield Police Station was completed during 

1977 and the building was formally accepted by the committee for the town on 
September 16, 1977. The Police Department moved into its new quarters on 
September 15th. By the end of the year, almost all of the remaining punch 
list items had been completed with the exception of the installation of the 
emergency generator and a few other small matters. 

Formal dedication ceremonies were held on December 30, 1977. The total 
appropriations for the project were $310,000. Expenditures and encumbrances 
through December 31st were $307,211.97 leaving a balance of $1,600 for a 
total uncommitted balance of $4,388.03. 

The committee wishes to thank the architect, Rich, Lang and Cote of Newton, 
Massachusetts and in particular Mr. Edward Cormier, Proiect Manager, and the 
contractor, Travi Construction, of Braintree, Massachusetts. In addition, 
the committee extends its appreciation to the Medfield Garden Club, Ellis 
Allen, Tree Warden, William E. McCarthy, Superintendent of Streets, Water and 
Sewer, members of his department, Fire Chief Ryan and Corning Medical Products 
Division for their assistance in the successful completion of this project. 
The committee also wishes the members of the Medfield Police Department a 
long and successful occupancy in the new headquarters. 

The Police Station Study Committee was pleased to be of service to the 
residents of Medfield and is confident that the new police station will be of 
great assistance to the members of our Police Department in providing public 
safety service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

\haX\)JLvi W. KuAkn2A, Chairman 

TkomaA A. McG^wXi 

TkomaA I/. Su)e,mz.y , 3n. 

CkaAtte W. GsU^in 

WWLLam H. Uann, Chief of Police 

MLchaoZ J. Suttivan, Ex Officio 



THE AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my annual report for the town ambulance for the year 
ending December 31, 1977. 

We made a total of 281 runs during the year and responded to 5 mutual 
aid calls, 3 to Millis, 1 to Walpole, and 1 to Dover. We called for mutual 
aid 11 times: 9 from Millis, 1 each Dover and Walpole. 

The ambulance had no major breakdowns during the year. It has about 
17,000 miles on it. The state ambulance inspector inspected the ambulance as 
per state law and listed many items to correct, including painting the 
vehicle white. We have corrected most of the items as required but are still 
awaiting delivery on some equipment. The emergency Medical Services Committee 
met several times throughout the year and decided not to consider painting 
the ambulance white as it is impractical in an area such as this because of 
low visibility, during the winter especially. 

We also ran some classes during the year to help educate the public in 
CPR and First Aid. Robert E. Meaney, Jr. and Michael J. Cellucci gave several 
hours of instruction in CPR and First Aid in Adult Education, Police Depart- 
ment and various school and other groups. We hope to increase the number of 
courses in 1978. 

I will be recommending a slight increase in ambulance rates during 1978 
:o offset increased operating costs. 

Many thanks to the EMS Committee, Chief Joseph Ryan, Dr. James Sullivan, 
Robert Meaney, Jr., and Michael Sullivan. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WWUam H. Mann 
Chief of Police 



40 



THE CIVIL DEFENSE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

With changes being made in the Civil Defense Preparedness Program, 
members of the Medfield Civil Defense Unit have spent many hours on the 
number one priority duty and that is the updating of our E.O.C. (Emergency 
Operations Center). Ceilings, walls, cupboards and files have been painted; 
chairs were donated and a general sprucing up of the area undertaken. 

The Auxiliary Police Unit has been very active as in the past, and 
hundreds of hours have been donated by the members as well as being active on 
our two "compulsory drills" held at the Fourth of July and also at Halloween. 
We are working under a procedures program set up by Police Chief William H. 
Mann. We are very grateful to Chief Mann for his help and guidance in our 
programs. 

The Civil Defense Department is now responsible for helping out in the 
case of storms, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, and any other natural disaster 
that might strike the area. 

I would like to thank the Board of Selectmen for their help and 
cooperation, as well as Mr. Sullivan and his staff at the Town Hall, Fire 
Chief Ryan, the Highway Department, the School Department, and private 
citizens who have donated materials and time to help our unit. 

To the members of the Civil Defense Unit, I would like to express my 

deep and sincere thanks for all the help and cooperation that they have given 

during the past year. Without them, all that has been accomplished would 
have been impossible. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Civil Defense Director 



41 



THE WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



WATER DEPARTMENT 




1976 
Actual 


Total Services 




2,454 


Added Customers 




20 


Thousand Gallons: 






Pumped 




329,804 


Sold 




232,460 


Water Revenue 






Received 


$ 


110,569 


Expenses 


$ 


115,546 


Debt Service 


$ 


30,525 


SEWER DEPARTMENT 




1976 
Actual 


Total Units 




361 


Added Units 




123 


Sewer Use Charge 


$ 


19,427 


Sewer Installation 


$ 


2,500 


Septic Waste 






Disposal Fees 


$ 


1,640 


Expenses 


$ 


90,303 


Debt Services 






Sewer Project I 






(5.25%) 


$1 


,475,000 


Sewer Project II 






(3.5%) 




30,000 


Longmeadow Sewer 






Design (6%) 




30,000 


Longmeadow Sewer 






Construction (6%) 







Total Debt-12/31 


$1 


,535,000 


Principal Payment 


$ 


136,000 


Interest Payment 




86,383 




$ 


222,383 





1977 
Actual 




1978 
Estimate 




2,543 
89 




2,600 
50 




361,772 
240,210 




380,000 
320,000 


$ 


147,169 


$ 


150,100 


$ 
$ 


126,425 
30,000 


$ 


130,000 





1977 
Actual 




1978 
Estimate 


$ 
$ 


422 

61 

31,760 

1,625 


$ 
$ 


472 

50 

35,800 

1,700 


$ 
$ 


1,640 
102,068 


$ 
$ 


1,640 
96,000 


$1 


,385,000 


$1 


,595,000 














15,000 






$1 


325,000 
,725,000 


$1 


300,000 
,595,000 


$ 

$ 


144,700 

88,744 

233,444 


$ 
$ 


130,000 

90,763 

220,763 



42 



WATER 

The Water Master Plan Update report, authorized in the Special Town 
Meeting of October 18, 1976, was completed by the Board's Consultant, Walter 
Amory, in late spring. The report set out in three phases, a planned water 
system improvement program for the 10 years, 1977-1988, and beyond. 

PHASE I-CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM : 

Year 1977 Test well reconnaissance and 8-inch test well in Mine Brook water- 
shed; installation of two booster hydrants; completion of 12-inch 
main in West Street and West Mill Street; engineering of 1.5 
million gallon storage tank on Mt. Nebo; acquisition of tank sites 
on Castle and Noon Hills; and acquisition of well site in Mine 
Brook watershed. 

Year 1978 Construction of 1.5 million gallon storage tank on Mt. Nebo with 
12-inch transmission main to Main Street. 

Year 1979 Construction of 12- inch transmission main from Mt. Nebo tank to 
Philip Street and miscellaneous control devices. 
Test well reconnaissance in Charles River Valley watershed. 

Year 1980 Construction of new well at site to be determined, together with 
transmission mains. 

Year 1981 12- inch main connection from High Street to Indian Hill Road via 
various routes. 

PHASE II-CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM ; 

Year 1982 12-inch main from Philip and Fairview Streets to South Street and 
Rocky Lane. 

Year 1983 12- inch main from Main and Spring Streets to South and Spring 
Streets. 

Year 1985 Construction of 1.5 million gallon storage tank on Noon Hill to- 
gether with transmission main and control devices. 
12- inch main in Noon Hill Street from tank to South Street. 

Year 1987 12-inch main in Noon Hill, Causeway and Orchard Streets to Niantic 
Road. 

Year 1988 Construction of well and pumping station at site to be determined. 

PHASE III- IMPROVEMENTS : 

Clean and line 16-inch main in Harding and North Streets; construction of 
1.0 mgd well and pumping station at 8-inch Hospital test well together with 
12-inch transmission main; install 12-inch main in Harding Street from 
Marlyn Road to Dover-Sherborn Regional High School; construction of 1.5 
million gallon storage tank on Castle Hill with transmission main; install 
12-inch main in Main Street from Bridge Street to Hatter's Hill Road; con- 
struction of 12- inch main in High Street from South Street to Forest Street; 
construction of 8-inch main in Plain Street with an 8-inch connection to 
Granite Street and construction of 8-inch main in Farm Street from existing 
end to Town line with 8-inch connection to Harding Street. 

43 



A number of the recommended 1977 projects have been completed or are under 

way. Engineering for a 1.5 million gallon storage tank on Mt. Nebo is in 

progress, as authorized by Article 13, S/T/M 1977 and a public hearing before 

the Zoning Board of Appeals is scheduled for January 5, 1978. A Snp^-toi 
Permit for municipal use and a variance for height is requested. The Mt. Nebo 

site was purchased by the Town as authorized by Article 35, A/T/M 1963 for the 
purpose of erecting a water storage tank. 

Town forces installed water mains in several areas in the north end of 
town which connected three loops in the system thereby improving water dis- 
tribution. 

In June 1977 the Federal and State mandated "Safe Drinking Water Act 11 be- 
came effective. This Act requires the municipal Water Departments, among 
other things, to test the system water twice a month at 6 to 8 taps randomly 
located in the Town system. Various tests for potential contaminants are 
made at State certified laboratories with reports sent to State and local 
officials. 

Water level telemetering equipment was installed at the State Hospital 
storage tank which automatically starts the Town wells if water in the storage 
tank drops below safe levels. This installation has considerably reduced the 
number of low water pressure complaints. 

With the uncertainty of the status of the State Hospital, the Board re- 
commended, to the Selectmen that preliminary steps be taken to acquire the 
State Hospital storage tanks, well fields, capped test well and pumping 
station should it become necessary. 

During the summer, a pipe line flushing program was instituted which re- 
moved sediment that collects in the lines over a period of time. This program 
will continue on an area by area basis over a period of years. 

The Board is currently performing an in-house water rate analysis. The 
Board, by legislative enactment, is mandated to adjust rates such that the 
department is self supporting. 



SEWER : 

Bids were received and are currently under review for construction of 
Phase I interceptors and street sewers in the south end of Town. The program 
consists of four contracts with Contract 1 having 16,760 feet of sewer main; 
Contract 2, 19,550 feet; Contract 3, 15,300 feet; and Contract 4, 5,500 feet. 
It is expected that actual construction will begin in early 1978. 

Federal and State construction funding for Phase II sewers in the north 
end of Town was not received due to a change in funding eligibility in- 
stituted by the new EPA Administrator, Douglas Costle, in Washington, D.C. 
The new policy requires a house to house survey of septic system failures in 
order to demonstrate the percentage of system failures as a criteria for 
funding. The design for Phase II sewers has been completed under Federal, 
State, and Town funding and the Board will continue to seek construction 
funding when and if money becomes available. 

The Board, with significant input from the WWTP operators, was able to 
have our waste water discharge permit modified to reduce total phosphorus 

44 



limits and have the units removed entirely from November 15 through May 15. 
This action resulted in savings of several thousands of dollars in chemical 
costs. The requirement of advanced Nitrogen removal has also been delayed 
with a resulting delay in WWTP expansion. 

The Board granted permission to the University of Lowell for an EPA fund- 
ed study on physical and economic impacts of septage loading at the WWTP. A 
report on this study is forthcoming. 

The Board's effort to obtain funding for a Facility Master Plan Update as 
mandated by the Federal and State Discharge Permit was defeated at the Annual 
Town Meeting and could not be considered at the Special Town Meeting due to 
lack of a quorum. The Board has received notice that the Federal and State 
agencies are proposing legal action against the Town for being in violation 
of the Discharge Permit. The lack of the update study has delayed negotia- 
tions with the Town of Millis regarding their potential connection to the 
Medfield WWTP. 

During the year, Thomas Costello, former Operator- in charge, of the WWTP, 
resigned his position to become Chief Operator at the new 5 mgd WWTP in Hull, 
Massachusetts. We wish Tom continued success. Kenneth Feeney and Peter 
Iafolla have taken the examination for Grade 5 Operators and have been main- 
taining the quality of excellence which has become synonymous with our plant. 

We were very pleased that through the efforts of the Board of Selectmen, 
the Southwest Area Selectmen's Coordinating Committee toured the Plant on 
October 19, 1977. Included with the group was Representative George Sprague 
who has assisted the Board in numerous legislative matters. The Plant is 
also regularly host to various official State groups who use the Plant as an 
operational model. 

The Board wishes to thank all Water and Sewer Department Personnel, Board 
Secretary, Mrs. Simpson, Superintendent Bill McCarthy, Foreman Charles H. 
Evans and all those Town Boards and officials who have freely given of their 
energies assisting us in carrying out our operations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BViuce 0. TobAJU&on, Chairman 

John V. Wi&UamA, Clerk 

Leland V. B&veAagz 

John A. Ro4£ J/t. , Associate Member 



45 



THE PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Planning Board hereby sumbits its Annual Report for the 
year ending December 31, 1977. 

RESIDENTIAL GROWTH OF TOWN : 

The Planning Board, as authorized under Chapter 41 of the General Laws, 
approved a revised plan of Colonial Park and one Definitive Plan of Noon Hill 
Estates III containing 47 lots off Orchard Street. 

The Board released 15 lots for building within subdivisions and signed 
26 plans that did not come under the Subdivision Control Law. This is the 
smallest number of lots released within the last ten years. 

A table is included indicating subdivision lots approved for building and 
the number of lots remaining in each subdivision to be built. The table 
covers active subdivisions. 

(SEE SEPARATE SHEET FOR TABLE) 

UPDATING OF ZONING BYLAW : 

In response to a mandate by the State, the Board spent many hours review- 
ing the Zoning Bylaws with Town Counsel to bring them in accordance with the 
Zoning Act of 1975 for vote at the 1978 Annual Town Meeting. In working with 
the businessmen and other interested citizens within the community, we have 
had hearings to discuss how to best enlarge the Central Business District, at 
the same time reviewing the Metcalf & Eddy recommendations in the Commercial 
and Industrial Impact Study, Plan and Program for the Town of Medfield, 
Massachusetts. These discussions have resulted in the Planning Board pro- 
posing 220 feet of land on North Meadows Road for rezoning to Business and 
changing the requirements for apartments which will lessen the possibility of 
any drastic increase in population density due to apartment construction. 

SUBDIVISION RULES & REGULATIONS UPDATE : 

The Board has been working with their consultant over the past two years 
on the Land Subdivision Rules and Regulations for the Town of Medfield. The 
future strength of the community - aesthetic and economic - relies on its 
growth. The value and beauty of growth are results of proper land Sub- 
division Rules & Regulations. 

OTHER ACTIVITIES : 

As a result of these activities the Land Subdivision Rules & Regulations 
are now in conformity with Chapter 41 and the revised Zoning Bylaws will 
bring us into conformity with Chapter 808 of the Acts of 1975. 



46 



Members of the Board have attended various meetings with other Town Boards, 
the Landfill Site Selection Committee, the Historic District Study Committee, 
the Park and Recreation Advisory Board, the Selectmen, as well as having 
liaisons with all major Town Boards. Board members have also attended meetings 
of the MAPC, Massachusetts Federation of Planning Boards, the Charles River 
Watershed Association, and Natural Valley Storage project meetings. 

Whitman & Howard, an engineering consultant, again reviewed subdivision 
plans, inspected subdivision street construction for the purpose of estimat- 
ing surety and performed other engineering services as required. They also 
assisted in bringing together the new Subdivision Rules & Regulations of the 
Planning Board. 

The Planning Board is continuing its awareness of the concern of the 
residents and businessmen of the town regarding the Central Business District 
and the Residential Urban area. In response to this concern we are proposing 
changes for apartment zoning that will allow for less density in the RU 
District. As a result of last year's annual meeting and in accordance with 
Metcalf & Eddy's recommendation, we are proposing the expansion of the 
business district on North Meadows Road. 

The residential change was an outgrowth of the Metcalf & Eddy Physical- 
Social-Economic Impact Study of Various Types of Housing upon the Town of 
Medfield. At the same time the Board is proposing that site plan approval be 
included in the scope of the Planning Board's duties. Such a provision will 
allow the Board to act to protect the historical and natural resources of the 
Town. 

The Planning Board recommended all or portions of Essex Road, Mohawk 
Street, Indian Hill Road, Penobscot Street, Hemlock Lane, Eastmount Road and 
Pilgrim Lane for town acceptance in 1977. 

During the year the Board reviewed 19 Sign Permit applications and parking 
plans for two commercial buildings and one apartment complex. The Board re- 
appointed Margaret Bancroft and appointed Dorothy Sumner and Lawrence Stiers 
for a three-year term as members of the Master Plan Implementation Committee. 

Under the provisions of the New Sign Code adopted at the 1977 Annual 
Meeting, the Planning Board also appointed Donald H. Harding, Henrietta 
Maloney, John K. Squier, Roy C. Watson, C. Richard McCullough and Robert N. 
Zabe to the Sign Advisory Board. 

GENERAL : 

The Board acknowledges the cooperation and assistance of other Town Boards 
and departments over the year. 

All regular Planning Board meetings are open to the public; however, 
appointments must be made the Thursday before the Monday meeting. Requests 
for information may be obtained from the Planning Administrator, Mildred E. 
Willis. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Voyiald J. McVoyuolM, Chairman 

C. Ulchand McCtMough, Vice Chairman 

Rob&ut J. La/ikln, Secretary 

Rob&ut A. ICinAmcin 

KmnUk M. CkilcU, J*. 

47 





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49 



THE MASTER PLAN 
IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Master Plan Implementation Committee hereby submits its 
Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1977. 

A study was made by this committee to determine what, if any, changes 
should be made to the Zoning Bylaw to keep future growth within the guidelines 
of the Master Plan and the Master Plan Updates. Attention was focused 
primarily within the RU Zone, where the greatest potential for accelerated 
growth exists. A map was constructed showing individual lots within the 
studied area and growth-related factors such as sewers and the ability of a 
lot to accommodate multi-unit dwellings; a questionnaire was circulated on a 
random sampling basis; and members of this committee testified at a public 
hearing held to discuss this subject. Conclusions of this study were pre- 
sented to the Planning Board. 

Both the Massachusetts Office of State Planning and the Metropolitan Area 
Planning Council (MAPC) presented Growth Policy Reports developed in accord- 
ance with the Massachusetts Growth Policy Development Act, Chapter 807 of the 
Acts of 1975 and incorporated the recommendations submitted by this Town's 
Growth Policy Committee in July, 1976. The Master Plan Implementation 
Committee reviewed the Growth Policy Reports of the State and MAPC for com- 
patibility with the Medfield Growth Policy recommendations and the Master 
Plan. Comments were voiced at regional and state public hearings and question- 
naires were filled in and returned to the State and MAPC. 

Other tasks performed by the Master Plan Implementation Committee included 
compilation of a tabulation of land-locked, or "lollipop" parcels of land in 
Medfield and review of a water study for this region written by the Metro- 
politan Area Planning Council. Discussion was started relevant to the 
possibility of developing bicycle paths in Medfield as recommended by the 
Master Plan, and this committee plans to act on this matter in the coming 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Vaviidl I/. Vtvutz&dhd, Chairman 
SanA&eJLd Btimnan 
UaAgaAeX BancAofit 

VhXLVlCAA R066-1 

Al&xande/i J. Smuth, Ji. 

Lawimce. E. Stlvu* 

Vonotky SumnoA 

RobeAt N. Zabe, 

MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



50 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Board of Appeals on Zoning submits herewith its report for the year 
ending December 31, 1977. 

The Board was organized as follows: 

Robert F. Sylvia, Chairman 
Charles H. Peck, Secretary 
William F. McCarthy, Member 
Burgess P. Standley, Associate 
Paul E. Rhuda, Associate 

During the past year the following applications were heard and decided: 



4 variances from lot frontage requirements 

1 variance to allow homes to be built on 
undersized lots 

1 variance from lot size 

1 special permit for dentist office 

1 variance to build residences on 
industrial land 

1 variance to allow retail buildings 
on residentially-zoned lot 

2 variances to allow a lot made nonconforming 
to be considered to be a conforming lot 

1 variance to allow a parking lot in two 
districts B and RU 

1 variance to allow a real estate office in 
an RT zone 

1 special permit for home occupation 

1 variance from lot size, and setbacks 

1 variance from frontage requirments 

1 variance from lot line restrictions for pool 

1 variance from side and rear setback for 
garage and porch 



Allowed 

Denied 
Denied 
Granted 

Denied 

Denied 

Denied 

Granted 

Denied 

Allowed 

Denied 

Denied 

Denied 

Allowed 



51 



1 variance from lot width Denied 

1 variance from sideyard restrictions Denied 

In each case, the decision of the Board of Appeals was unanimous. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robz/ut F. Sylvia., Chairman 
BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 




APPEAL BOARD DELIBERATES 
James 0. Aronson, James T. Regan, and Robert F. Sylvia 



52 



THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This past year has been one of growth for the library with new services 
offered at little expense to the taxpayer, primarily due to the efforts 
of volunteers and funding by private sectors in town. 

We were very pleased to see the formation of an active Friends of the 
Library group which has undertaken a number of new and exciting programs. 
Under the presidency of Marilyn Connors, the Friends have started an adult 
Great Books Discussion group which meets biweekly at the library. Another 
endeavor has been the volunteer staffing of the library on Sundays to allow 
for opening the facility from 2-4 P.M., from October through mid-May. An 
adult rental collection of books on the best seller list is also a Friends' 
project. This collection helps to alleviate the long waiting lists for 
these books. For children, the Friends have sponsored monthly film programs 
and a Halloween mask-making session. To all the volunteers who have worked 
so hard, I express my sincere appreciation. 

The most exciting happening of the year was the arrival of the computer 
terminal last summer, which was on loan from Babson College. Using a tele- 
phone hook-up to the College, the terminal was programmed with over twenty 
games which challenged both young and old to beat the computer. It was also 
possible to do original programming or to select from numerous other programs 
ranging from the stock market to women's liberation. Its constant use day 
and night, often by young people who had never been attracted to the library 
before, has led to preliminary plans to provide this service again next 
summer . 

To secure information as to how well the library is meeting the needs 
of the community, the Trustees and Head Librarian drew up a survey which was 
distributed to every household. Although returns were disappointingly low, 
the final results showed that over 80% of the respondents felt that the 
library is meeting their needs within the present financial and space limit- 
ations. A different survey was distributed to all Junior and Senior High 
School students, and tabulations on it revealed that 89% of the students 
use the Medfield Public Library, but that 37% had to use out of town 
libraries to meet their research needs. Other information obtained from the 
surveys will be helpful in providing direction to the Trustees and staff in 
new programming, book selection, and services. 

Beginning July 1, the library opened mornings from 10 A.M. to 12 noon 
on a daily basis to meet the requests of many townspeople who find these 
hours most convenient. Another change which took place, with the approval 
of the Trustees, was designating every Friday as a day when only half the 
amount of fines would be charged. This policy was established to encourage 
the return of overdue books on a more timely basis. 



53 



Through the generosity of several private funding sources, the library 
was able to expand its services. The Hannah Adams Woman's Club donated money 
to purchase a portable electric typewriter which will be available for public 
use both in the library and at home. Our good neighbor, Corning Medical, 
provided the library with a grant to purchase two multi-volume sets of 
specialized encyclopedias: The Encyclopedia of Science and Technology and 
The Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences . Finally, the Friends of the Library 
provided money to purchase five additional art reproductions for public 
circulation. To all the above groups the library staff and Trustees express 
sincere appreciation. 

Other on-going library activities included monthly film programs for 
residents of Tilden Village, several art exhibits by local artists, and the 
initiation of a cooperative program with the Massachusetts Commission for the 
Blind whereby the library will endeavor to increase awareness in our 
community of services available to the visually handicapped. 

The children's room of the library has also been an active place during 
the year, and to compensate for the increased amount of work, the number of 
hours worked weekly by the Children's Librarian was increased from 20 to 25 
hours. On an experimental basis, the weekly Story Hour was expanded to in- 
clude three year old youngsters for the first time, along with the four year 
olds. An evaluation of the program will be made at the close of the Spring 
Session. Our thanks is expressed to the Jaycette volunteers who helped with 
Story Hour. 

During January and February a creative drama class was held for 8-12 
year old children, and a busy summer schedule was also maintained. During 
July and August mornings, films and stories were offered for 4-7 year olds 
on a weekly basis, and afternoon programs on different foreign countries 
were conducted for older children by Medfield residents who had lived in the 
country. Authentic items and slides were shared with the children, and a 
native food was prepared and enjoyed. 

During the fall, a representative from the Norfolk County 4-H program 
conducted four weekly sessions on growing plants and exploring the crafts of 
macrame and applique. 

In closing, mention needs to be made of the severe crowded conditions 
which exist at the library, and as new books are purchased the situation 
worsens. During the year a great deal of effort was spent on searching for 
alternate sources of funds for building an addition, but unfortunately, it 
was discovered that foundations are not giving grant money to municipal 
institutions for construction purposes. 

I again wish to thank all the people and organizations who donated their 
time or money to the library this past year. It is gratifying to know that 
so many care about improving the level of service. Finally, I wish to thank 
the Library Board of Trustees for their continual support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jane, B. kiokzx. 
Head Librarian 



54 



1, 


,047 


1. 


,228 


22, 


,420 



Annual Statistics 

New Applicants for library cards 

New Acquisitions 

Total number of Volumes owned 

Total Circulation 71,011 

STAFF 

Jane. 8. kidhoA, Head Librarian 
BcUibaAa VsUmd, Assistant Librarian 
C0VWll<L JoneA, Children's Librarian 

VaJiqIvwol Mu/dLty, Senior Library Aide 

AIDES 

Ua/Ulyn Enlckson KaAm Btumgvoynne. CneAyl Vunlexi 

VajiqIvuxl Cuusack Svudan FlneAty WaxJLe. hx.no. 

Kanm KUUxn VoJUvlqao. ViMleA 



THE TRUSTEES OF THE 
MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Trustees of your Library would characterize the past year as one of 
constructive progress qualified by frustration that we are not progressing 
faster. We are surely encouraged by the increased use of our small but 
dynamic facility and wish only that we could serve more people in terms of 
required reading space and books and services available. 

During the year, the Trustees reviewed the results of a town-wide 
Library use survey. Most respondents were very pleased with services avail- 
able and helpfulness of Library personnel. A majority also expressed the 
need for an expanded selection of books available and for the Library to ex- 
tend its hours of operation. 

With gratitude, we note that in response to a call for volunteers on the 
survey form, the "Friends of the Medfield Library" was re-established as a 
volunteer support adjunct to the professional staff. Through the efforts of 
these volunteers, under the leadership of Mrs. Marilyn Connors, the Library 
has been opened on Sunday afternoons and a number of films and other timely 
programs have been presented. 

The Trustees reviewed the current insurance coverage on the buildings 
and contents and recommended increased coverage for both categories. The 
Town has acted affirmatively upon this recommendation. 

With regard to our acute, pressing need — an expansion of facilities — it 
ts here we feel much frustration. During the year, we were informed 



55 



officially that we were unsuccessful in our quest for federal Public Works 
Act funding of our Library expansion plans. While later funding is remotely 
possible, we are turning our attention to other sources but it is apparent 
that whatever the final recommendations, at least partial town tax support 
will be required. Our needs are not for luxury but for maintenance of an 
adequate standard of service to the town. Our beautiful building simply has 
been outgrown. 

Chairman James Barton and member David Wilmarth declined to run for new 
Trustee terms in the past town elections. They were replaced by the under- 
signed who was elected chairman upon the resignation, for reasons of re- 
location, of Mary Ellen Donahue and by Martin Gottlieb. Kenneth Hunt was 
elected by vote of the Trustees and Selectmen to replace Mrs. Donahue. The 
Trustees are grateful for the services of Messrs. Barton and Wilmarth and 
Mrs. Donahue. 

We wish to thank the Library staff personnel, directed by Mrs. Jane 
Archer, for their excellent work during the year and the Selectmen, members 
of the Warrant Committee and users of the Library for their understanding, 
assistance and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jokn F. W£64£eA, '.Chairman 
V2.bon.a.h StohAA, Vice Chairman 
UaJutin GottLLeh, Secretary 
3a.no. GuLthsvLo. 
KmnoAb. Hunt 
Ann Thompson 




SELECTMAN CHAIRMAN WILLIAM R. REAGAN, EXECUTIVE SECRETARY MICHAEL J. SULLIVAN 
AND WARRANT COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN PAUL VALZANIA AT ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Photo by Ann Thompson 



56 



THE HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

On February 6, 1977, dedication ceremonies were held at Tilden Village, 
Medfield 's 60-unit elderly housing project, on Pound Street. This was the 
culmination of years of effort by local officials and many members who had 
served on the Housing Authority over the years and the great support the Town 
had shown for senior citizen housing. The dedication ceremony, held outside 
on what was one of the coldest days of the year, was attended by over 300 
persons including State Representative George Sprague who has given the 
Housing Authority so much support, members of the Board of Selectmen, past 
members of the Medfield Housing Authority, all of the residents of Tilden 
Village, members of most of the Town Boards and Committees, and many interest- 
ed Townspeople. Although Congresswoman Margaret Heckler was unable to attend, 
she did send an American flag which had flown over the Capitol Building in 
Washington, D. C. 

The six residential buildings at Tilden Village were named for famous 
Medfield residents of the past: Francis Hamant, Margaret Sheppard, Henry 
Adams, Samuel Bullen, George Inness and George Barber. The Community Build- 
ing was named for Hazel R. Frank who had served on the Housing Authority as 
the Governor's appointee since the Housing Authority's inception in 1968. At 
the dedication ceremony, Mrs. Frank was given much of the credit for bringing 
this dream for elderly housing in Medfield to reality. The elders and the 
Town will be forever indebted to Mrs. Frank for her years of service. 

In March, Raymond D. Cynewski and Peter A. Gaines, both of whom had been 
appointed to fill vacancies on the Authority in 1976, retained their seats in 
the general election. In April, Housing Authority Member, Dorothy D. Anastasi 
resigned for health reasons and Medfield resident James E. Ryan was appointed 
by the remaining Housing Authority Members and the Board of Selectmen as her 
replacement. After serving on the Housing Authority for nine years, Mrs. 
Frank's tenure as the Governor's appointee ended, and Mrs. Jane N. Kelly was 
appointed by Governor Dukakis to serve on the Authority for a five year term. 
In May, our legal counsel, Martin Gottlieb, resigned due to other town 
commitments. 

Along with the entire Town, the Housing Authority was saddened by the 
sudden passing of one of its past members and dearest friends, Herbert B. Burr. 
We were honored that Mr. Burr was able to share his thoughts with us and offer 
the Benediction at our dedication ceremonies in February. His years of 
service to the Town in several official capacities will long be remembered. 
Thanks to the generosity of Mr. Burr's family and friends, the Herbert B. Burr 
memorial fund was established through the Medfield Housing Authority and to 
date, a beautiful, healthy tree has been planted in his name at Tilden Village. 

The balance of 1977 was mostly one for reflection on a job well done and 
looking forward to the years ahead and future planning. All of the sixty 
units at Tilden Village were rented as were the twenty-six units the Authority 
leases at Wilkins Glen. The Housing Authority maintains waiting lists for 
both of these projects. The Housing Authority carried on its business of 



57 




DEDICATION CEREMONIES AT TILDEN'S VILLAGE 
February 6, 1977 




PRESENTATION OF PEAK HOUSE PAINTING FOR HAZEL FRANK 
COMMUNITY BUILDING 



58 



managing Tilden Village, continuing to make policy and learning from its 
mistakes. 

If the phrase "all's well that ends well" has any meaning, it surely was 
appropriate for a situation which developed this year at Tilden Village. The 
Housing Authority had made policy that all dogs and cats would have to leave 
Tilden Village by September 30th. In a great show of unity most of the 
residents at Tilden Village, along with many concerned townspeople, petitioned 
the Housing Authority to include a grandfather clause with the new lease for 
the residents which would allow existing pets to remain. After many meetings 
and much discussion, the Housing Authority did, in fact, reverse its earlier 
decision and voted to include a grandfather clause. Everyone seemed pleased 
at the outcome, especially some of our four-footed friends. 

The Housing Authority's Executive Director, Marie K. Roberts, and Tilden 
Village's Maintenance Supervisor, John P. 0' Toole, continued as the backbone 
to the very successful day to day management of Tilden Village. Additionally, 
the Housing Authority would like to acknowledge the ongoing support of the 
community in general for the great interest shown in the elders of Medfield, 
and finally, and most importantly, the efforts and love the residents have 
shown for Tilden Village and for each other. 

The Housing Authority maintains its office at Tilden Village oh Pound 
Street and anyone wishing any type of housing information should feel free to 
call us. Our meetings are held on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each 
month and the public is encouraged and welcome to attend. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Raymond P. CynWAki, Chairman 
MLckaoJt W. TammoAo, Vice Chairman 
PeXeA A. G0U.YIQA, Treasurer 
JameA E. Ryan, Assistant Treasurer 
Jane. W. Kelly, Secretary 



59 



THE CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The year 1977 might someday be regarded as a landmark year for con- 
servation in Medfield, yet we regard the year as essentially one of consolid- 
ation while we performed consistent with our long range plan. The reason 
1977 may become well remembered is because the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
inaugurated purchase or taking by easement of almost one- third of the town. 
Meanwhile we attended to "business as usual." We held a record 9 hearings 
under the Hatch Act, explored the possibility of acquiring four different 
parcels of land, and closed on the acquisition of two parcels. 

The Corps of Engineers' invasion came about as a result of Congressional 
approval of the Charles River Natural Valley Storage Project, a scheme where- 
by the U.S. Government would "take" all the wetlands in the upper Charles in 
order to ensure that they would be left in their natural state. The wet- 
lands of Medfield, Millis, Medway etc. serve as a vast sponge to store water 
in the event of a storm, thus reducing the possibility of flood damage in 
Boston. While we endorsed the concept of Natural Valley Storage as a way to 
ensure that our major wetlands are never filled in, we were apprehensive 
about control of the land after it was taken. It turned out that no one in 
the Corps had thought about management. At the prompting of several town 
officials a regional management plan is being worked on under the coordin- 
ation of the Metropolitan Area Planning Council. Meanwhile town owned land 
will be "taken" by easement, meaning that we will retain a direct control 
over its recreational use. 

Hearings held under Chapter 131 Section 40 (Wetlands Act) are listed 
below: 

Applicant & Project Description Commission ' s Determination 

Town of Medfield - Repair of Stone 

Culvert Vine Brook at North Street Act not applicable 

Alexander Marvin - Homes on West 
Mill Street Act not applicable 

Town of Medfield - Landfill extension Approved 

Town of Medfield - Sewall Brook and 
Horse Brook Interceptors Approved 

Town of Medfield - Flint Locke Lane 
to Pine Street Interceptors Approved 

Pascal Levesque - Elm Street pond 
enlargement Act not applicable 



60 



Robert Coleman - North Street pond 
creation Approved 

Steven Stivaletta - Morse Drive 
lot #49 Approved 

Steven Stivaletta - Morse Drive 
lot #52 Denied 

One Order of Conditions issued in 1976 was appealed by the applicant, 
Mandu Inc., and a new Order superceding ours was issued by the Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Quality and Engineering. As a result, a signifi- 
cant amount of wetlands has been drained and, provided systems can be 
installed, a large housing development will eventually replace the swamp. 
This case provides obvious evidence to us that the Wetlands Act is not work- 
ing. On top of this, Mandu Inc. is suing the Conservation Commission, among 
others, for conspiracy against their civil rights. Needless to say, we are 
somewhat discouraged being told to act as a tribunal for the public interest, 
for no pay, regarding the protection of wetlands, only to discover that a 
single politically appointed state bureaucrat can over- turn our decision. 

Concerning land acquisition, we are happy to report that the Noon Hill 
land acquisition program, started in 1974, is now complete with the purchase 
of Patrick Harris 1 land. Also we conummated the purchase of 2.3 acres of 
land on Noon Hill from Charles Weeber, such acquisition being approved at 
last year's town meeting. We are also negotiating arrangement of a gift of 
6 acres off Rolling Lane from Robert McCarthy. We were offered 15 acres of 
wetland, located off Elm Street, by the Hale Reservation and refused it, re- 
lying on the Wetlands Act to prohibit development. 

Having reported all this, we feel compelled to register our concern 
about the limited progress of our land acquisition program. We view as the 
major task of the Commission the preservation of open space in Medfield so 
that the town will retain its rural character as it grows. We believe we 
have a good long range plan which, briefly, sets priorities for open land 
preservation as follows: (1) secure additional open land in the Noon Hill 
area, (2) secure a "green belt" along Mine Brook, and (3) retain as much open 
land as possible in the Medfield State Hospital area. Unfortunately land 
acquisition takes money and that affects the tax rate which has been soaring, 
Meanwhile, funds from the State and the Federal Government for land acquisi- 
tion are becoming scarce. Without funding we are reduced to accepting gifts 
of land here and there. In short, our land acquisition program is stymied. 

At the same time, soaring taxes are one of the causes of increased 
development activity in Medfield. Indeed, the very areas identified for open 
space preservation are being threatened by development. For example, we are 
aware of a subdivision planned for Noon Hill, and it is rumored that another 
development may occur off PhiliD Street. We would not be surprised to see 
the State Hospital land earmarked for residential development. Certainly the 
construction of town sewers allows development of land which would not take 
individual septic systems. As development occurs, it is generally agreed 
that our tax rate is adversely affected in that increased tax revenues are 
more than offset by the costs of additional public services needed. We are 
caught in a vicious circle of upward spiraling taxes, and have very little 
control over our own destiny concerning Medfield 's development. 



61 



We hope that you are addressing yourselves to this problem and suggest 
that part of the solution may lie in creation of a fund for open land 
acquisition. While this may add a few cents to the tax rate, the increase 
may be less than what may occur as a result of development. Another solution 
may lie in the area of providing tax relief to donors of conservation ease- 
ments. Other towns have tried this idea with considerable success. 

During the year, we had an unusually large turnover in the membership 
of the Commission. Robert Kinsman resigned as Chairman to serve on the 
Planning Board. His leadership and dedication will be sorely missed. We 
also accepted with regret the resignation of William Walsh and Alden Pember. 
Peyton March and Tobey Reed were appointed full members of the Commission, 
replacing Messrs. Kinsman and Walsh. David Martin, Edmund Hammond, John 
Guthrie, and Richard Bryant have joined the Commission as Associate Members. 



Respectfully submitted. 



Han&on C. Robbing, Chairman 

WVhio PzdeAzlvii, Vice Chairman 

RobeAt MacLeod, Treasurer 

Vfidd HaJVvUon 

Tobzy Rzzd 

€nm.n SoJAoZ 

P&yton MaAck 

Vavid WaXtlvi, Associate Member 

Edmund Hammond, Associate Member 

John GutfovLe., Associate Member 

RickaJid Bnyant, Associate Member 




SKETCH OF NO.ON HILL ACROSS THE MEADOWS c. 1900 



62 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During calendar year 1977, there was a significant increase in the work- 
load for the two Board of Health agents, brought about by construction of a 
number of residences on lots having problems with respect to on-site sewage 
system design and installation; the evaluation of a definitive subdivision 
plan; the need to upgrade the facilities and quality of service of some re- 
tail stores and food service establishments; an increased number of com- 
plaints relative to the minimum standards for human habitation in rental 
dwelling units; and an increase in the number of animal control complaints. 

Mr. William Domey, our health agent responsible for monitoring on-site 
sewage disposal, reviewed the system design work on 41 new systems and the 
installation of a number of other systems designed last year, and monitored 
the performance of percolation tests and deep test holes, to be used in the 
future design of a number of other systems. Also during the year, he evalua- 
ted one definitive subdivision plan, and his recommendation was considered 
by the Board and formed the basis of the Board's approval, with reservations 
for the plan which we presented to the Planning Board. Mr. Domey reviewed a 
number of requests for approval of plans for the repair of defective or 
failed septic systems, and made recommendations for acceptable corrective 
actions within the limits imposed by Title V of the Department of Environ- 
mental Quality Engineering and the Medfield Board of Health Rules and Regu- 
lations. Mr. Domey continues to serve as an agent of the Board of Health on 
a yearly contract basis. 

As of July 1, 1977, Mr. John H. Keefe, our Registered Sanitarian, 
became a part-time employee of the Town of Medfield the same as all of the 
other inspectors. During 1977, Mr. Keefe made 188 inspections of food ser- 
vice establishments and retail food stores, with at least two inspections 
being made at each facility, and in most cases, facilities were inspected at 
least quarterly. Unfortunately, there are a few establishments which con- 
tinue to operate just above the minimum levels for compliance with Article X 
of the State Sanitary Code, and these consistent violators were ordered to 
attend a meeting before the full Board of Health. As a result of these 
meetings, improved compliance has been obtained in most cases, and compliance 
activity will be continued during 1978 to assure that standards are main- 
tained. 

Additionally, Mr. Keefe made 26 inspections of dwelling units as a re- 
sult of either complaints or observations made by other town inspectors with 
respect to violations of Article II of the State Sanitary Code covering the 
minimum standards for human habitation. Fourteen miscellaneous inspections 
were made in areas such as the public bathing beach, a semi-public pool, the 
laundromat and gas stations, and there were eleven miscellaneous complaints 
investigated for a total of 244 inspections, an increase of approximately 
25% over last year. 

Other Board activities included holding a hearing on the extension of 
the landfill for solid waste disposal and the granting of a garbage collec- 
tion contract to Mr. Francis J. Cassidy of Medway. Garbage collections con- 
tinue to be made once a week during the winter and twice a week during the 
summer . 

63 



As was the practice during the summer of 1976, the Board monitored the 
bacteriological and physical quality of the water at the Hinckley Memorial 
Pond. Again, the bacteria count remained low throughout the swimming season 
however, during the first few weeks of the swim season, the visibility con- 
tinued to be a problem. After a few weeks, this problem was corrected, and 
visibility for the balance of the summer was acceptable. 

Our animal inspector, Dr. Wilbur M. Salter, D.V.M., has had a number of 
animal control complaints this past year, and would like to remind residents 
that the keeping of horses, livestock, and certain other animals and fowl, 
except by permit of the Board of Health, is prohibited. All horses must be 
immunized against encephalitis annually, and dogs must be immunized against 
rabies by the age of six months and re-immunized at intervals not exceeding 
24 months as a condition of being licensed. Also, residents are reminded 
that all animal bites or scratches must be reported immediately to the 
animal inspector in order that he may quarantine the animal and, if neces- 
sary, arrange for laboratory examination. The basis for a number of the 
animal complaints during the past year was the keeping of excessive numbers 
of cats, pet birds and previously uncontrolled animals, such as pigeons. 
Early in 1978, the Board intends to modify its animal control rules and 
regulations to address these issues, and hearings will be announced when 
these regulations have been prepared. 

BOARD OF HEALTH PERMITS ISSUED 

Restaurant, counter bars and cafeteria food service 15 

Food stores and markets 6 

Temporary food service permits 6 

Catering permits 2 

Mobile food service 1 

Milk licenses - vehicles and stores 11 

Bakeries 2 

Ice cream making 1 

Laundromats 1 

Funeral Director 3 

Syringe permits 1 

Horse, animal and farm permits 38 

Septic installers 17 

Septic pumpers and carters permits 11 

Refuse and offal carters permits 8 

Disposal work construction permits 41 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE 

The Visiting Nurse Association of Dover, Medfield, Norfolk, Inc. 
attended 27 meetings, seminars and conferences for educational purposes. 

Lead screening for children 0-6 years old is held on the third Monday 
of every month (unless there is a holiday) from 1:30 to 3:30 P.M. at the 
Medfield Town Hall. 

Mantoux testing for T.B. is done in the office by appointment. The 
Association also assists in the schools with their Mantoux programs. Report! 
and statistics for various governmental agencies take much time and effort 
for the Public Health nurses. Supervision and orientation of Home Health 
Aides is another service provided by the nurses. In addition, this year, 
a learning experience in Visiting Nursing and Public Health Nursing was pro- 
vided for four Peabody L.P.N, students. 



64 



Public Health Nursing visits to new boras; communicable disease follow-up; 
one case of TB with contacts tested and referred to appropriate resources; 
ten salmonella cases with follow-up and enteric culture kits provided with 
teaching to patients and their families were part of this year's statistics 

Medfield Statistics for 1977 



Types of Visits 

Nursing 

Home Health Aides 

Physical Therapy 

Types of Clinics 

Senior Citizens Blood 
Pressure 

Senior Citizens Flu 

Immunization 



Cases 



Visits 



128 


1,099 


10 


626 


10 


60 


Number 


Number attended 


10 


212 


1 


81 


1 


552 



Immunization included Diptheria, Tetanus, Whooping cough, measles, mumps 
german measles and polio. 

Equipment was provided to 25 patients; biologies depot was maintained 
for vaccines and diagnostic kits; and health programs were carried on for 
nursery schools. 



OUTREACH PROGRAM 

In 1977, the Town gave its support for the Outreach Program by partial 
funding. At the Annual Town Meeting, the sum of $12,500. was appropriated. 
The program is currently being administered by the Medfield Committee, Inc. 
and a Board of Health Advisory Committee. 

Statistics - January 1977 through December 1977: 

One hundred and seventy-five people have had individualized or family 
contact with the Outreach Worker regarding a range of issues. Although the 
following statistics cannot be generalized to be representative of the total 
population of Medfield, they do represent the percentages of the Outreach 
Worker's time spent focused on these particular issues with these one hundred 
and seventy-five people. 



Family related issues 


40.5% 


Drug related issues 


9.5% 


School related issues 


8 % 


Alcohol related family issues 


7.5% 


Individual personal issues 


7.5% 


Alcohol related issues (youth) 


5 % 


Child abuse 


5 % 


Runaway 


A % 


Crisis intervention 


3 % 


Sexuality 


3 % 


Pregnancy 


2 % 



65 



Alleged sexual assault 2 % 

Alternative housing 1.5% 

Rape crisis counseling 1 % 

Psychiatric intervention necessary 1 % 

V.D. 0.5% 

In 39.6% of the contacts, the youths were involved also with the District 
Attorney's Juvenile Diversion Program or the Probation Department of the Dis- 
trict Court. 

Client-related contacts with the school department: Guidance, adminis- 
tration and teachers, special services; the police and the courts; state and 
private social services agencies; the clergy, etc. represents a large part of 
the Outreach Worker job. It is important to note that anonymity and confi- 
dentiality are an important part of the service. The client-related contacts 
do not violate these aspects of the individual relationships. 

The Outreach Worker has served as a resource person to the District 
Attorney's Juvenile Diversion Program. Mrs. Rabe meets regularly with the 
case-worker from the D.A. 's program to determine the needs of the clients and 
to establish short-term counseling relationships as possible with the youth 
referred by the Medfield Police Department. 

The Outreach Worker is Chairperson of the Youth Advisory Commission, a 
selectmen-appointed commission, representing a cross-section of town govern- 
ment and community including four youth members. In cooperation with the 
school department, members of the League of Women Voters, Police Department, 
Clergy and many alcohol related social service resources, the Youth Advisory 
Commission will be presenting a seminar focusing on many issues related to 
alcohol abuse. This will be held this winter. We have focused on Juveniift 
Diversion, youth employment, littering, vandalism, recreational alternatives, 
etc. 

The Outreach Worker supervised a C.E.T.A. youth employee who ran a sum- 
mer youth job bank. 

Mrs. Rabe is presently on a task force with the Office for Children, the 
Department of Public Welfare, the Department of Mental Health and other local 
youth programs to develop resources for short-term emergency shelter for ado- 
lescents. She also serves on the Superintendent of Schools' Community Advi- 
sory Council. 

The Outreach Worker can be contacted by victims of rape and other sexual 
trauma. Short-term crisis oriented counseling, supportive liaison work with 
medical, police and court personnel can be provided as desired by each victim. 

Mrs. Rabe is involved in a graduate program in human services and will 
receive an M.Ed, from Antioch College in June, 1978. 

She is accountable to both the Board of Directors of the Medfield Commit- 
tee, Inc. and a Board of Health Advisory Committee (protecting the confiden- 
tiality of the individuals involved with the Outreach Worker) for administra- 
tive and statistical purpose on a monthly basis. 

The prime purpose of the Outreach Program continues to be aimed at crisis 
intervention, short-term counseling and referral to other social service 
agencies. 



66 



MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAM 

As in 1976, the town continued its support of the Norfolk Mental Health, 
the South Norfolk County Assoc, for Retarded Citizens and Home Health Aid 
Programs on a per capita basis, as provided for in the enabling legislation 
establishing these bodies. The School Department is now picking up a good 
deal of the Norfolk Mental Health Program costs, since most of their effort 
is directed toward assistance to the School Department. 



The Medfield Board of Health normally holds its meetings on the second 
and fourth Mondays of each month at the Town House. These meetings are open 
to the public and citizens are invited to attend. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Tkomou, A. Ca/iaglMmo, Chairman 
F/iancXa X. Cu/uty, Clerk 
RichaAd H. WheZzn 
MEDFIELD BOARD OF HEALTH 



THE MEDFIELD-NORWOOD MENTAL HEALTH 
AND RETARDATION AREA BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield-Norwood Mental Health and Retardation Area Board of the 
Department of Mental Health consists of 21 citizens appointed by the Governor 
to act as representatives of their communities in issues regarding the compre- 
hensive delivery of mental health and retardation services. 

The Area Board representative from Medfield for 1977-1978 is: 

Margaret Vasaturo 1 Emerson Road 359-4320 

For questions or suggestions regarding mental health and retardation 
services, call your Area Board representative, or, the Area Office in 
Medfield at 727-8908, or 359-4312, extension 203. 

Respectfully submitted, 

The Medfield-Norwood Mental Health 
and Retardation Area Board 



67 



THE NORFOLK COUNTY 
MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Citizens of Medfield: 

Submitted herewith is the report of the Norfolk County Mosquito Control 
Project of its activities in the Town of Medfield for the year ending 
December 31, 1977. 

Aerial applied larvicide 63 acres 

Larvicide by backpack and mistblowers 520 acres 

Catch basin application for larvicide and adulticide 830 

Adulticide mistblowing from trucks 6280 acres 

Aerial U. L. V. adulticide application 4800 acres 

Ground U. L. V. adulticide application 5472 acres 

Drainage ditches cleaned 7762 feet 

Brush obstructing drainage cut 2325 feet 

Culverts cleaned and opened 17 

Recorded calls for information and assistance 88 

Respectfully submitted, 



THE TREE WARDEN AND 
INSECT PEST CONTROL DIRECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and 
Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

Most of our work on trees this past year was due directly to the 
devastating snow storm of May 9, 1977. At that time, we were operating with 
the 1976-1977 budget and the 1977-1978 budget had already been set at the 
annual town meeting. It was necessary to expend extra funds for the cleanup 
of debris of tree limbs and to remove or repair broken limbs still remaining 
in the trees. 

The cleanup of debris was the largest undertaking since the ice storm of 
the late 20 f s. This cleanup was made possible by all town departments 
coordinating manpower and equipment for a combined effort greater than any 
previous storm. 

The Gypsy Moth population is on the increase and for May and June 1978, 
we are expecting such a population in the eastern area of town so as to 
necessitate an aerial spray to control them in the residential sections and 
along roadsides. We will also be spraying with ground equipment where neces- 
sary. 

One aerial spray for mosquitoes was applied in July with good results. 
Sufficient money is requested this year for two sprays to supplement the work 
of Norfolk County Mosquito Control Project. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EZLU W. Ateen 

T^ee Wandm 6 

VXAdoXoK. o{ InA&ct Put Control 




Robert H. Luke, Jr. 



Bob served as a Park Commissioner from 1968 to 1974, and as a member of 
our Insurance Advisory Committee from 1968 to 1970. Bob enriched the lives 
of many of the youth in our community. The love he held for them was 
returned in kind. A fund was established in his memory at the Youth Center, 
the proceeds of which have been used to support the Mini-recreation Center. 



70 



THE PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

The Park and Recreation Commission completed another very active year 
with its involvement in the creation of capital facilities at Metacomet Park, 
the ongoing rehabilitation of the Community Center Building, improvements at 
Hinkley Pond, the operation of over twenty-five recreational programs and the 
establishment of a number of new programs. 

Continuing a long established policy of offering a wide spectrum of re- 
creational activities to the residents of Medfield, the Commission's programs 
included Auto Mechanics, Summer Playground, Tennis Lessons, Girls Softball 
and a Halloween Party, to name a few. 

The Recreation Coordinator stressed arts and crafts, trips to the thea- 
tre, museums and the zoo at the Summer Playground to add variety to the 
Commission's always popular athletic programs for children. The Commission 
is also sponsoring theatre trips for senior high age students and anticipates 
more involvement with this type of more passive recreation. Tournaments in 
basketball, billiards, table tennis and volleyball were offered with young- 
sters in New Hampshire and Vermont. 

New programs included boxing, Mini-Rec, Operation Adventure and Creative 
Dramatics. Interest in older programs, such as swimming lessons, reached an 
all time high. 

Many of the Commission's activities are either partially or entirely 
self-supporting through registration fees. 

The Commission regrets that Mrs. Genie T. Roberts submitted her resig- 
nation during 1977. 

The Town and the Commission owe a debt of gratitude to the many volun- 
teers who contributed so generously of their time and effort for the enjoy- 
ment of others. Without these volunteers, many of the Town's recreational 
activities would not be possible. The Jaycees and Jayceettes contributed 
the equipment and drinking fountain at the children's playground in Metacomet 
Park, very needed and generous gifts. 

And, as always, the Park and Recreation Commission is indebted to other 
Town departments, notably the Highway, School and Conservation Commission, 
for making possible many of our activities and capital improvements. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WaA/ien E. ShoxUid, Chairman BaAba/iCL MaZl{i 

Enlc W. O'&itm, Clerk John Nichols 

ZLchaAd V2S0n.Qh.2A ZLchaAd E. Nlck2A6on 

WULLam J. H2JUL2A HickaAd CantA2Ut, Coordinator 



71 



COMMUNITY GARDENS COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The community garden program completed its second successful year at the 
Dale Street gardens. Six new plots were added bringing the total number of 
plots to forty-eight. After an informational meeting in January, regulations 
were written for distribution to participants. At the suggestion of several 
present at this meeting a winter registration was held to enable gardeners to 
get an early start on seed orders. A joint seed purchase program was tried, 
but was dropped because of lack of interest. Some of the drainage problems 
arising the first year of the program were corrected and the remaining 
drainage problems were noted so that they can be corrected next year. 

Revenue from the $5 registration fees was $240 and was turned in to the 
Town Treasury. 

The committee especially wishes to thank Superintendent McCarthy and em- 
ployees of the Water and Highway Departments for their assistance in pre- 
paring the plots and Theresa Prince for her efficient handling of the garden 
registration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ellen Gilbond 
William lUkzJbonJU 
Roy Owen 
UaAio Vzd.QJizi.Yii 
MickoLoJl J. SuUUvan 



BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Building Code Board of Appeals submits herewith the report for the 
year ending December 31, 1977. 

There were no appeals made to the board; and therefore, there were no 
meetings and no expenditures during the entire year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HcWiy C. IhoJUiouo, Chairman 
Anthony C. CqmXjokz 
E. Paul Conkum 
Philip Bonanno 
JamoA J. LzonaJid 

72 



YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In response to a continuing need for an ongoing conference to study, 
relate to, and deal with the issues and goals of youth within the Community, 
the Youth Advisory Commission, a Selectmen appointed Commission, is in its 
second year of operation. Its membership is composed of a cross-section of 
town government and the community, as it includes four high school students, 
one member each of the Board of Selectmen, Park and Recreation, School 
Committee, Clergy, Police Department, and the Outreach Worker. The 
Commission's experience has led it to conclude that the Board should serve 
as an advocate, and not as sponsor, of youth programs and issues. 

During the past year, the Youth Advisory Commission has continued to 
support the District Attorney's Juvenile Diversion Program. The Commission 
gave its support to the concept of the Mini-Recreation Center which was 
utilized by youth throughout the spring and summer and was operated success- 
fully. It served as one facilitating body for the development of "Operation 
Adventure", an "Outward Bound" type recreational program. This program has 
been operating since the end of the summer and has been enjoyed by hundreds 
of youths. The Commission developed and distributed a questionnaire to 
students in grades 9-12 which elicited feedback on how students feel about 
a variety of issues. From the questionnaire, we found enormous interest in 
the use of the Youth Center as a Mini-Recreation Center, as well as use of 
town land for alternative recreational activities, which served as support 
for the development of "Operation Adventure." This summer when the con- 
tinuance of the Federal Government's In-School C.E.T.A. Youth Job Program 
was at risk of being cut back considerably, the Youth Advisory Commission 
wrote letters to Senator Kennedy, the State C.E.T.A. Director and the local 
C.E.T.A. consortium administration advising against the cut back. Presently, 
the numbers of slots have increased from last year. The board sent a 
member to the Educational Cooperatives Conference on Vandalism who made a 
full report to the Commission. We followed up on some of the recommendations 
of this conference with the Chief of Police to pursue preventative measures. 
The Commission met in an open session before the high school student body 
last spring in order to inform them of our existence and purpose. The Board 
organized a litter "clean up" campaign. The Youth Advisory Commission 
supported the Summer Job Bank for youth which was run in cooperation with 
the Outreach Worker's Board of Directors, the Medfield Committee, Inc. 
We have distributed newsletters to the student body informing them of school, 
civic and social activities which might be of youth interest. 

At present, we are coordinating an Alcohol Awareness Seminar which will 
take place this winter. This effort is being organized through the coopera- 
tion of the School Department, members of the League of Women Voters, a 
representative from S.H.A.R.P., an alcohol rehabilitation program, etc. 
Resources from A. A., Alanon, Alateen, the National Council of Alcoholism, the 
South Shore Council on Alcoholism to name just a few who are working together 
to make this an informative program. The purpose of this program is to make 

73 



a positive impact on youth auto injuries/fatalities due to mixing alcohol and 
driving. The program was further spawned by a concern about other alcohol re- 
lated problems. 

We wish to thank all of those who contributed to making the Commission's 
second year a successful one. 

Respectfully submitted, 

IhahoX. W. Rabe, Chairperson 

RlckaAd VoJSotigk&i, Vice-Chairman 

LauAa Booth, Secretary-Treasurer 

R. EdiAXVid BuoJid 

Vawn I. hxbtui 

VauJL E. HoticAoAA 

RoboAt Houghton 

CkoAteA BuAkd 

Kcutklzzn SkloJti 

Stapkm kvigaLU, 

VoJVtoX BateA, Associate Member 

K<L\)in Biddy, Associate Member 

John T. Ga/ivny, In.. , Associate Member 

Youth Advisory Commission 



THE DOG OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my report as Dog Officer for the year ending December 
31, 1977. 

Number of complaints responded to 966 

Amount of money assessed in fines $550.00 

Dogs killed by automobiles 18 

Dogs picked up by Dog Officer 392 

Court citations issued 263 

People required to attend Court 5 

People found guilty by District Court 5 

Injured animals attended to 83 

Dogs registered in 1977 1,154 

Kennels registered in 1977 24 

Dogs returned to other towns 43 

Respectfully submitted, 

W^ULLam J. JmneXtz 
Dog Officer 



74 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report for Veterans' Benefits Assistance and Veterans 
Services for the year ending December 31, 1977. 

The following is a breakdown of service and assistance rendered Medfield 
Veterans and their dependents as authorized by the Commissioner of Veterans' 
Services: 

VETERANS' BENEFITS 

This assistance includes food, clothing, fuel and medical expenses for 
Veterans and their dependents which the state reimburses fifty percent to the 
community. 

Application for Ordinary Assistance 25 

Benefits Administered 19 

VETERANS' SERVICES 

This program is designed to orient and educate the veteran with regard 
to Federal and State programs of assistance and direct them toward the insti- 
tutional program. 

Hospitalization 12 

Education 25 

Burial Allowance 17 

Civil Service 10 

Social Security 35 

Pension Assistance 34 

I wish to thank Charlotte Randolph and town officials for their coopera- 
tion and assistance this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul F. CuAAan, 
Veterans' Agent 



75 



THE COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen; 

The Medfield Council on Aging is justly proud of its accomplishments 
during 1977. We will continue to work diligently on behalf of Medfield f s 
900 Senior Citizens in 1978. 

Nutrition Site - Lunches sponsored by King Philip Elder Services, 
WaLpole, provides hot lunches (with special diets considered) five days a 
week available to all senior citizens. A 50c donation is requested of the 
mrticipants. The nutrition site is located at the First Baptist Church of 
Medfield. In the future, if needed, a meals-on-wheels program will be devel- 
oped. 

Activities - Since the First Baptist Church is available from 10:00 A.M. 
to 2:00 P.M. five days a week, the Council on Aging, if feasible, would pre- 
fer to center activities there. At this date movies, flower arranging, 
guest speakers and entertainment have been scheduled. The Council hopes to 
develop this area into a social center as well as a nutrition site. 

Survey - The Boy Scouts under the direction of Eagle Scout Nominee, 
James Regan, visited all senior citizens. The Council, after tabulating the 
results, will then best be able to ascertain which areas of need should be 
developed in its programming. 

Coordinator - The Council on Aging has been most fortunate to obtain 
the services of Bill Priest through CETA to coordinate all programs spon- 
sored by the Council on Aging. The Coordinator also assists with informa- 
tion on Social Security, food stamps, home health care, Medicaid, Medex, 
utilities information, discounts from local merchants and other information 
as it becomes available. Visitations to elderly, speakers, entertainment, 
arranging transportation to the nutrition site and other programs as neces- 
sary are also the responsibility of the Coordinator. The Council on Aging 
is seeking finances from the Town of Medfield to continue this much needed 
service for the elderly. 

Health Services - Influenza immunization was provided by the Council 
for all elderly desiring this protection. Blood tests are available at the 
Medfield State Hospital through appointments with the Coordinator. Awareness 
of a cancer detection center at Pondville was made available by the Coordi- 
nator. Blood pressures by the Visiting Nurses Association is an on-g0i$g 
program, Medi-facts is a new program developed to assist emergency person- 
nel with pertinent medical facts during an emergency. The Council on Aging 
has mailed these cards to all senior citizens to be filled out and placed in 
their refrigerators. All fire, police, local physicians, etc. have been 
notified of this program. 



76 



Newsletter - HOPE ( Help Older People Enjoy) has been expanded with 
mare information provided by the Coordinator to benefit the elderly with a 
calendar of activities included. This newsletter is mailed to all elderly 
of Med field monthly. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ElA.za.boXh L. Ma/utin, Chairman 
MadeZnim I. Ha/idinq, Vice-Chairman 
Ge.n2.vZ2.v2. K. Reagan, Secretary 
Edwin Flah.2AXy, Treasurer 
VAJlQinAjCL CoupeA 

TkomaA I/. Su)2.2.n2.y, Si. 
G2Atn.1x.d2. Ekn2A 

Ck0Al2A Vy2A 
COUNCIL ON AGING 



THE ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is my report for the year ending December 1977. 

Twenty- two dogs were examined for having bitten or scratched people. 
These animals were subsequently quarantined for a period of ten days. When 
these animals were checked at the end of the quarantine period, none of them 
showed any evidence of rabies. Two dogs and one bat were sent to the 
Wasserman Laboratory for examination for rabies. None were found to have any 
evidence of rabies. 

Forty-one stables and paddocks used for shelters for horses, cattle, 
sheep, swine or goats were examined for general cleanliness, sufficient water, 
adequate light and conformance to board of health rules and regulations. 

For the annual inspection, a total of 97 horses, 22 ponies, 16 cattle, 
44 sheep and 4 goats were inspected for, and appeared to be free from any 
communicable diseases. 

Respectfully submitted, 

blUbuA M. SaJtt2A, P.V.M. 
Animal Inspector 
WMXam J. l2.nn2XX.2- 
Assistant Animal Inspector 



77 




Herbert B. Burr 



Herb Burr was a beloved member of our town family, having served in many, 
many capacities from 1955 to 1977, including Selectman, Veterans' Agent, 
member of the Finance Committee, Board of Public Welfare, Board of Appeals 
on Zoning and Subdivision Control and more recently as a member of our 
Housing Authority and as Inspector of Buildings. A fund has been established 
in his memory at Tilden's Village. 



78 



THE INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending December 31, 1977 
submitted in memory of the la£e inspector, Herbert B. Burr, who faithfully 
served the Town in this capacity for 11 years. 



DEPARTMENT 


PERMITS 


INSPECTIONS 


INCOME 


EXPENSES 




1977 


(1976) 


1977 


(1976) 


1977 


1977 


BUILDING 


234 


(255) 


771 


(1,148) 


$5,228.00 


$6,411.10 


PLUMBING 


149 


(127) 


289* 


(317) 


$2,662.00 


$2,595.24 


GAS 


82 


(91) 


104* 


(105) 


$ 656.00 


$ 895.21 


WIRING 


214 




375* 












(249) 




(415) 


$1,800.00 


$3,016.00 



*Plumbing - 203 inspec. made by inspector, 86 by assistant inspector 
*Gas - 90 inspec. made by inspector, 14 by acting inspector 
*Wiring - 254 inspec. made by inspector, 21 by assistant inspector 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 



New single family dwellings 
Additions to private dwellings 
Renovations to private dwellings 
Multi-family, 23 units 
Renovations to business buildings 
Additions to business buildings 
Private swimming pools 
Reshingling roofs and installation 

of new sidewalls 
Accessory bldgs. (storage shed) 
Residential garages 
Demolitions 
Tents (temporary) and structures 

other than bldgs. 
Signs 
Stoves (wood-burning) 

TOTAL PERMITS 



57 
20 
57 

1 
10 

4 
14 

34 

1 
5 



3 

22 

2 

234 



Estimated construction costs on new dwellings 
(1976 - $2,463,500.00) 

79 



$2,305,000.00 



Estimated construction costs renovations, 

additions, pools, shingling & sidewalls, etc. $ 371,330.00 
(1976 - $413,267.00) 

Renovations and additions on business $ 97,827.00 

(1976 - $132,500.00) 

New construction on business/industrial 

(1976 - $259,000.00) 

New multi- family building - 23 units $ 300,000.00 

(1976 - $600,000.00) 

The Building Inspector continues to enforce the State Building Code 
which requires the inspection of schools, churches, and rest homes as well 
as all other places of assembly. The inspectors have continued to attend 
state mandated courses which have led to the certification of both Mr. Perry 
and Mr. Palumbo by the Massachusetts State Building Code Commission. 

A newly authorized requirement of issuing permits for the installation 
of wood-burning stoves has added to the joint inspections performed by the 
Building Inspectors in cooperation with the Fire Chief. 

PLUMBING INSPECTION 

Of the above listed inspections, 245 were regular plumbing inspections, 
44 were concerned with investigation, administration or enforcement in 
connection with violations. In addition, 16 letters of correspondence and 
numerous telephone calls were made in relation to violations of the State 
Plumbing Code. 

GAS INSPECTION 

Of the above inspections, 17 were made to investigate violations of the 
Gas Code and to enforce correction. 

WIRING INSPECTION 

In accordance with State Law, the permit application form to provide 
notice of installation of wiring shall be uniform throughout the Common- 
wealth and as of January 1, 1978, that form will be available to electri- 
cians for submission in the Inspection Department. 

The first full year of the Inspection Department operating with all 
inspectors working out of a single office has been very successful. The 
transition to an "inspection office" to handle all calls and permit appli^ 
cations has been a smooth one. Gratitude is expressed by all the inspectors 
to Mae Otting for her assistance in achieving this more efficient system. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Vh<l&qjvLq,\i C. ?wty f GdoKQd €. Nye., 

R&bel I. VaJbmbo, Plumbing Inspector 

Local Inspectors of Buildings 

Jotzpk F. Esakinz, WaJUex R. Wt/e, 

Inspector of Wires Gas Inspector 



80 



THE SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is my annual report for the year 1977. 

SCALES 

Over 10,000 lbs. 
5,000 to 10,000 lbs. 
100 to 5,000 lbs. 
Under 100 lbs. 
Less than 10 lbs. 

WEIGHTS 

Avoirdupois 
Apothecary 

AUTOMATIC MEASURES 
Gas Pumps 
Yard Sticks 
Tapes 

TRIAL WEIGHINGS 

Unit prices in stores checked weekly 

Expenses 

Salary 

Bond 



SEALED 

1 
1 
5 
15 
2 



29 
22 



40 
3 


409 



$239 
$ 20 



Receipts 



$174.60 

Respectfully submitted, 

IU.cha.eZ W. lammojoio, 
Sealer of Weights Measures 



81 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Commission has made steady progress during the year concentrating 
on keeping industry in Medfield and attracting Massachusetts based industry 
to relocate in Medfield. The, politics and cost structure of Massachusetts 
have made it difficult to obtain responses from out-of-state firms. 

A parcel of industrial land has been transferred to a developer who is 
interested in a planned industrial complex as soon as tenants are located. 

The Commission has worked with Radio Frequency of Medfield to find 
suitable land for expansion. At a meeting with Selectmen, Mr. Sugrue from 
the Massachusetts Department of Commerce and Development, Radio Frequency, 
and our Commission possible future plans for establishing an Industrial 
Finance Authority for the selling of Industrial Revenue Bonds was discussed. 
The bonds are used to finance manufacturing or research industries and carry 
the Town's name, however, liability is borne by the purchaser. These bonds 
usually carry interest rates a few percentage points below conventional 
financing. Since Medfield 's name would appear on the bonds, and Radio Fre- 
quency is a financially stable industry, it was determined that the incen- 
tive was not worth the risk. 

The Commission was instrumental in placing a small growing computer 
company in a vacant building on Adams Street. The prospects of this firm 
expanding and remaining in Medfield are great since some of the principals 
live in town. 

A major Massachusetts employer 1 reviewed & 50-acre parcel and has in- 
cluded that information in its real estate file for future expansion re- 
quirements. 

Information was disseminated to several Massachusetts realtors and 
corporations who requested data on Medfield 's industrial property. 

The Commission is pleased with the progress of beautifying the Central 
Business District which followed our lead in upgrading the Town Hall area. 
Beautifying the Town Center can only help attract commercial and industrial 
development. 

Donald Harding was appointed to represent our Commission on the Sign 
Advisory Board. 

Walter Frank, who was chairman of the Commission since it was reor- 
ganized in 1973, resigned this year. His untiring and unselfish dedication 
to Medfield during his tenure guided the Commission on many projects which 
benefited the townspeople a great deal. Some of these accomplishments in- 
clude many meetings with landowners and developers, coordinator for Central 
Business District beautification, conception and completion of the Town Hall 
parking lot and the Town Hall Plaza. Walter Frank will be missed by our 
Commission and the many people he interfaced with in the business community 



82 



and town hall. Paul E. Hinkley was appointed to fill the unexpired term 
Walter Frank. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WiLLlam HLkoJLovuA , Chairman 

Ge.0n.g2. Graham, Secretary 

Uonman Gfiay, 3k, 

Donald HaAdmq 

Paul Hlnkl&y 

7 'Human UdtheAton 




WARRANT COMMITTEE MEMBERS RICHARD LYMAN, CHAIRMAN PAUL VALZANIA AND 
ROBERT STOKES LISTEN ATTENTIVELY AT ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Photo by Ann Thompson 



83 



CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

1977 has been a bery active year for the Central Business District 
Committee. In April, Chairman Sweeney attended the Governor's Conference on 
Revitalization, on behalf of the residents of the Town. At this conference, 
it was readily apparent that Medfield should be involved in such a program in 
the Central Business District and that many resources are available to assist 
us. 

During the remaining months of the year, the committee met with many con- 
sultants. From these meetings we became aware of sources of funding and man- 
power that could be sought by the Town for the Town and property owners with- 
in the Central Business District. During the ensuing year, we will hopefully 
be able to obtain more information in this area. 

Through the efforts of the committee, a tree planting program will 
commence in the Spring of 1978 in cooperation with the Tree and Highway De- 
partments along North Street. 

Christopher W. Gloss of the Boston office of the National Trust for 
Historic Preservation reported on the status of the Central Business District 
including in-depth reports on the physical, economic and population charac- 
teristics as well as neighborhood dependencies. The entire report is avail- 
able in the Town Hall. 

The committee was formed approximately two years ago in response to local 
merchants' needs for additional parking in the_ commercial area. As a result 
of this issue, others in the community were asked to participate. The 
committee continues to be concerned about parking within the district. We 
feel that in the near future, the Town must make some kind of commitment for 
public parking. 

Members sought to broaden the scope of the activities and issues considered 
by the committee. An enlarged philosophy coupled with broad based community 
representation caused the committee to begin formulating a more comprehensive 
plan for downtown improvement. This includes establishment of goals and 
objectives, foremost of which included a long range ' solution to the parking 
problem in the commercial area, a plan for commercial facade improvement, and 
the formulation of a workable design review ordinance. 

In general, the committee is undertaking its work at a stage in the town's 
development where a program of massive revitalization is not necessary but 
rather a detailed plan for maintenance, both in terms of the physical 
structures and their appearances as well as a program for sustaining economic 
activity is required. 



84 



Public meetings are held at the Town Hall on a regular basis and public 
input is very important to the Town's future. The committee would welcome 
your attendance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Tkomtu I/. Smm&y, Ja., CkcuAman 
Kmn&tk M. Ckildt>, J A. 
Vftad W. ClawUdgz, In. 
MaJigaxzt C. Endlm 
LoKAaJim G. Holland 
Allan J. LaAtUn 
AAthuA G. MaguuAe. 
Wittlam H. Mann 
WWUum E. McCarthy 
ElzanosL Ante, At>£>odato, membeA 
GzotiQd BcuXJle., AbAocMite. membeA 
RobeAt LoAkin, Ji. , A&booJjoJKi 
membe/L 

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT 
COMMITTEE 




EMPERON ONION'S CORNER GROCERY (ONCE LOCATED AT MAIN & SOUTH STREETS 
IN CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT) 




paWlipiP^ 



WJJHil*^*"" 1 



BAXTER HOMESTEAD (LOCATED OPPOSITE BAXTER PARK) 



85 



THE HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Citizens of Medfield: 

The Historical Commission submits herewith its fifth annual report, 
covering the calendar year 1-977, during which we met monthly, except for 
Augus t . 

We are summarizing our work for 1977 under four main headings: 

1. Aspects of which other Town departments, for various reasons, were most 
likely to be aware. These were: 

A. RESTORATION OF EARLY TOWN RECORDS. 



Continuing our program of preserving original documents of 
Medfield's early history, the Selectmen's Records for 1796-1816 
were restored by the New England Documents Conservation Center 
(at North Andover, Massachusetts) whose work in this highly 
specialized and exacting field is outstanding. 

Careful inspection disclosed that the records submitted 
for restoration in 1977 had obviously been scorched in one of 
the Town House fires, although less severely than those re- 
stored in 1976. The cost, however, was slightly greater, since 
rebinding was possible and could be done only by hand. (It 
might be added that the cost of restoring this one set of early 
town records used approximately one-half of our annual budget.) 

This preservation work of 1976 and 1977 offers insights 
into the actual steps by which Town policies were carried out, 
at a time when few towns kept separate records of Selectmen's 
meetings. 

. The Commission plans to have arrangements made for exhib- 
iting the restored work, with significant excerpts to be given 
to the press for publication, and to the history teachers for 
use in our schools. 

The Historical Commission was assisted in meeting the cost 
of the 1977 restoration work by a "matching grant" from the 
Massachusetts Council on Arts and Humanities, as well as by a 
generous contribution from the Selectmen's funds. 

B. SEWER ROUTES AND INDIAN SITES. 



In accordance with the General Laws (Chapter 40, Section 
8D) which state the purpose of a town Historical Commission to 
be "the preservation, protection and development of the histor- 
ical or archeological assets of such city or town", the 
Medfield Historical Commission continued in 1977 to urge 
archeological investigations of the areas proposed for sewer 
interceptors in the "Horse Brook and Sewall Brook areas." 

86 



In September 1911, we were informed that an archeological 
survey team from the Peabody Museum staff at Harvard University 
had found in August that no Indian sites of great archeological 
interest would be destroyed by the construction of the proposed 
sewer routes. (See report in Historical Commission files.) 

However, from evidence disclosed in 1966 and early 1977 
(see page 97 of 1976 Town Report) , it is apparent that the area 
near the junction of South, High and Spring Streets was occupied 
by Indians as long ago as 5,000 B. C, possibly earlier. We 
understand that any items of prehistoric origin that may be 
uncovered during the sewer construction must be preserved, and 
will become the property of the Commonwealth, which might give 
custody to the Town. 

OPPOSITION TO REZONING OF AN HISTORIC AREA. 

The Historical Commission joined with the Planning Board, 
the Conservation Commission, the Historical District Study 
Committee, the Warrant Committee, and the Zoning Board of 
Appeals in opposing the request of John and George Basile of 
Dedham, first for a variance and later for rezoning, to permit 
business use of 98,000 square feet of residential land off 
North Meadows Road, with a long narrow strip connecting the 
parcel to Main Street. 

The Historical Commission's stand in this matter was based 
on its obligation (General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8D) to 
preserve, protect and develop the historical assets of the 
Town. Our opposition to Article 18 of the Special Town Meeting 
of May 1977 was presented largely through a map of the area 
that would be affected by the proposed rezoning, and which 
contains the following: 

a. Two houses originating in the 1600' s, one of them as 
old as the Peak House, and full of evidence of 17th 
century construction — a potential candidate for the 
National Register of Historic Places. 

b. The Medfield Cemetery (close to the two houses men- 
tioned above), laid out in 1651, one of the oldest 
burying grounds in the Commonwealth and to be 
presented soon for nomination to the National Register 
of Historic Places. 

c. A group of well kept, modest 19th century houses, all 
at least 100 years old, which help to satisfy the 
State's requirement of housing for moderate income 
groups, as well as continuing Medfield' s historic 
character in this respect. 

(Article 18 would have required a 2/3 vote to pass, since the 
proposed rezoning constituted a by-law change. The article was 
defeated by a vote of 200 opposed to 62 in favor.) 



87 



2. A new phase of preservation work. 

A. CORRELATION OF CEMETERY DESCRIPTIONS WITH PLOT PLAN. 

The handwritten book containing exact copies of inscriptions 
on stones in Vine Lake Cemetery dated from the earliest years of 
the Town to November 1, 1899, has now been "matched up" by two 
volunteers, Mrs. Ellen Gruhn and her mother, Mrs. A. A. Bartels, 
with a numbered plot plan of cemetery lots furnished by 
Mr. Joseph Roberts of the Cemetery Commission. This coordination 
remedies a gap created by the destruction of cemetery records in 
the Town House fire of 1924. 

The original handwritten, bound book of epitaphs has been 
returned to the Medfield Historical Society, and several photo- 
copies have been made. These will be divided between the Histor- 
ical Society, the Cemetery Commission, and our own files. Hence, 
we hope that this portion of Medfield 's early records will be 
reasonably safe for future generations interested in tracing 
family "roots," or in what the carved words may reveal concerning 
the history or philosophy of earlier times. 

3. Historical Inventory. 

The basis of all historical preservation work in architecture 
is a listing of the Town's assets in this field. 

Such a compilation, begun in Medfield by the Historical 
Society in the 1960's, has been continued since 1973 by the 
Historical Commission and is continuing .'-through the work of 
Mrs. Eleanor Anes, Mrs. Ann Mentzer and Mrs. Patricia Rioux, 
assisted by volunteer Carol Hilton. (Many more volunteers are 
needed , however . ) 

During 1977, the detailed information contained in the 
Inventory files has been of value to the Historic District Study 
Committee; and has, also, furnished the basis for three new 
Historical Commission projects, as follows: 

a. A color-coded map, requested by the Planning Board, 
designated the age of the historic buildings in the 
RU-B and B-l sections of the Town. (This map is now on 
display on second floor of the Town House.) 

b. Meeting House Pond - In collaboration with the Park and 
Recreation Commission, a compilation of a research 
paper on the history of the pond, preparatory to sub- 
mission of the material to the National Park Service 
with a request for nomination of the Pond area to the 
National Register of Historic Places. 

c. Dated Sign Program - Owners of selected buildings in 
the center of Town, all of which are representative of 
the architectural history of Medfield 's development, 
have agreed to cooperate with the Commission in this 
program. Its eventual goal is the correct identifica- 
tion of structures and properties of historic and/or 
architectural significance within the Town. Residents 

88 



owning such properties or structures may petition the 
Commission for consideration under this program. 

4. Continuing responsibilities. 

These continuing responsibilities are matters in which the Commission 
has been active in the past, and which we continue to follow, in case 
reason should develop for renewed action on our part. 

A. AGE OF PEAK HOUSE. 



No further documentation has been uncovered in 1977 beyond 
that already summarized in our 1976 report, and as given also on 
pages 55 and 56 of Medfield Reflections, published by the 
Medfield Bicentennial Commission. 

Hence, it is still considered most probable that the Peak 
House was rebuilt about 1677, shortly after Benjamin Clark's 
first house was destroyed by King Philip's Indians. Both the 
title search and the architectural evidence for this conclusion 
are summarized, particularly the latter, in the pages cited above, 

B. TILDEN'S HISTORY OF MEDFIELD, 1649-1886. 

The 1975 reprinting, co-sponsored originally by this 
Commission and the Medfield Historical Society, continues to be 
purchased from the Society by local area residents, as well as 
by people far removed from Medfield — (as far removed as Michigan, 
California and England!) — who find the book a valuable^source of 
information on their own family backgrounds, or as shedding light 
on projects of general historical interest. 

C. HISTORIC DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE. 



The progress of the Study Committee is a matter of concern 
to the Commission since the two groups share an interest in 
Medfield' s architectural and cultural heritage. 

On the Study Committee the Commission is represented by 
Ann Mentzer. 



Our thanks are due, as always, to the many Town officials and employees 
who have helped us throughout the year. Without their aid, we could not 

function. 

The Commission wishes to record its particular gratitude to Mrs. Ellen 
Gruhn (now living in County Galway, Ireland) and to Mrs. A. A. Bartels of 
Wheeling, Illinois, for their many hours of work on the correlation of early 
gravestone inscriptions with lot locations in Vine Lake Cemetery. 

Respectfully submitted, 



David WiJbnaAtk, Chairman 

LauACL H. Smith, Vice Chairman 

Bu/igeAA P. Standing, Secretary 

Monman G/uiy, 3k. , Financial Secretary 

Ele/moi KneA ) 

Ann \hintzoJt ) Inventory Group 

VoJjlLqaxl Hloux) 

VonaZd J. MacVonald, Associate Member 

MEDFIELD HISTORICAL COMMISSION 




STAGECOACH STOP ON HARTFORD TURNPIKE (NEXT TO PEAK HOUSE) 



90 



HISTORIC DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Citizens of Medfield: 

The Historic District Study Committee submits herewith its second 
annual report, which covers the calendar year 1977. 

Your Committee met monthly, and for the most part, concentrated its 
efforts on preparation of a preliminary report following guidelines suggested 
by the Secretary of the Commonwealth. 

The Medfield Historical Commission has assisted in this undertaking by 
supplying invaluable information and maps, regarding earlier Medfield dwell- 
ings. The Committee has concentrated on a study of the West Main Street area 
from North Meadows Road to Bridge Street, including the Vine Lake Cemetery. 
A pamphlet is also being prepared explaining the more important reasons for 
an Historic District. The Massachusetts Historical Commission, and this 
Committee concurs, that the area of East Main Street, from the Peak House, in- 
cluding the center of town, would be eligible for listing, including as it 
does, houses and buildings dating from 1680 to the present century. 

The Committee wishes to point out to the Townspeople that the three 
prime reasons for establishing an Historic District are: 

1.) to preserve and protect the distinctive characteristics of 
buildings and places significant in the history of the town; 

2.) to maintain and improve the settings of these buildings and 
places; and 

3.) to encourage new designs compatible with existing buildings 
in the district. 

Consistent with these goals, it should be emphasized that this is a 
voluntary program, seeking the cooperation of citizens who are concerned 
with the preservation of the outward appearance of groups of homes and 
buildings because of their historic value. 

Medfield has, in past years, lost some of its oldest homes, but through 
purposes of the Historic District, the preservation of buildings from the 
earliest settlement of the town to this century is possible. 

We wish to thank all volunteers and Town Officers who are assisting in 
this undertaking. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LzaLLz Howlztt, Chairman 

Ann S. M&ntzeA, Secretary 

Ann M. Btayton 

Ca/iolyn B. CaAjOLQtia.no 

Donald J. MacVonaJLd 

Ho.nxloJXa M. MaZomy 

Historic District Study Committee 

91 



THE TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL 
VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The long awaited opening of the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School took place on September 19, 1977. The four years prior to that time 
were spent in preparation that promises to pay educational dividends for 
years to come. Before reporting directly on calendar year 1977, we feel a 
duty to reflect on the rationale for vocational education and to use that 
rationale as a measure for your new educational facility. 

Vocational education recognizes the need to introduce and to prepare the 
high school student for the industrial and commercial society in which he 
will emerge. The learning that takes place in all academic disciplines is 
made meaningful and realistic by relating directly to numerous occupations, 
and on site skill training is emphasized on an alternate week basis. The 
nuts and bolts approach to education appears to better equip high school 
graduates to choose options available to them in our adult world. They are 
ready for permanent work opportunities since they have already had their 
trial and error experiences, and should they so desire, they are able to con- 
tinue their education with better perspective than had they not experienced 
the world of occupations. 

We have noted with a great deal of satisfaction that first year students 
at Tri-County have come with a variety of expectations. Many are backyard 
mechanics who seek specific training in the mechanical and machine trades; 
others come expecting to prepare for more abstract and technical occupations 
as Terminal Technology, Electronics, and Drafting; those interested in art 
and layout have available to them several programs relating to Graphics; 
Distributive Education, Cosmetology, Culinary Arts, Child Care and Health 
Services are available to those interested in service occupations. The 
entire facility is beautiful in form yet practical in function, and the 
programs are sophisticated in their variety yet traditional in presentation. 

The year just past was obviously a very active one. For the sake of 
clarity the numerous activities and experiences that have taken place in 1977 
can best be discussed by relating to the following major concerns. 

Construction : 

At this time the building has been accepted by this Committee as being 
substantially complete; track and tennis courts are not yet completed. There 
remain also numerous punch list items that are presently clouded with 
significant claims by the general contractor that are now being heard by the 
American Arbitration Association. The Committee has filed a counterclaim for 
various incorrect and/or incomplete work as well as for considerable delay in 
completion. 



92 



Programs ; 

We are offering twenty-three vocational programs in Machine, Technical 
and Construction Trades and a number of Service Occupations. The full range 
of secondary school academics, with the exception of foreign languages, is 
also being provided. In January 1978, the Evening School Adult Program will 
open with opportunities for tradesmen to upgrade their skills or to learn new 
skills. All district residents are welcome to participate in the learning 
activities of their choice. 

Student Enrollment: 



Seven hundred fifty 9th and 10th grade students were enrolled in 
September, 1977. Of that number, 65 were residents of Medfield. Each year 
Tri-County will enroll an additional three hundred fifty students from the 
nine town district, bringing the eventual four-year enrollment up to fifteen 
hundred. 

Personnel : 

We have employed sixty teachers and approximately ten administrative and 
other support personnel. With all programs operating, but with only half 
enrollment, it was necessary to require most teachers to engage in several 
teaching preparations. We have been most appreciative of the versatility of 
our teaching staff. 

The entire Committee wishes to thank all of the friends of Tri-County, 
especially the students and their parents, and to invite all to visit or 
contact the school should we be able to serve in any way. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert J. Rappa, Chairman 

VqXqA S. HowqJUL, Medfield Representative 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School District Committee 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School District Committee 

Franklin - Thank VuLucia 
Franklin - RoboAX J. Rappa 
Medfield - VoAah. S. HouoeZt 
Medway - John C. HuAtzy 
Millis - RoboAt W. McVonougk 
Norfolk - \k<Lt\)AJi C. Long 
North Attleboro - AAthuA C. HUlman 
North Attleboro - John C. /Oia6 feooa fca6 
Seekonk - VdnniA Lima 
Sherborn - Many EtlzabeJh Vomo. 
Walpole - Louua E. HoigtVi 
Walpole - RsLckaAjd H. Hobnan 



93 



JURY LIST 1977 



Clarence S. Armstrong, Jr, 
Barbara B. Astle 

Jeffrey Baldwin 
Donald Batting 
James M. Bertram 
Charles S. Bickley 
Marion E. Bosselman 
William Boyko 
Virginia Calo 
Christine E. Campbell 
John W. Capone 
Thomas J. Cauley 
Gretchen B. Childs 

William E. Coffrin 
Julia A. Collins 

Theresa G. Cotter 

Joanne D'Angelo 

Beverly J. Darling 
Sedgren J. Dick 
Barbara B. Dooley 

Robert Erickson 
Rolin C. Fahrenkrog 
C. Charles Fattore 
Richard F. Hall 
John R. Henaff 
Albert J. Houde 
Gregory S. Hurd 
Grace May Iafolla 
Mildred Iafolla 

Donald C. Johnson 
Colleen A. Kean 
Joseph N. Kenney 
Kenneth H. Kindlund 
Ernest E. Knotts 

Josetta P. Knopf 



James W. Ledwith 
Francis A. Logue 

David M. Loker 
Deborah A. Lombard 
Kenneth A. Lowe 



1 Flint Locke Lane 
10 Steven Lane 

56 A Harding Street 
18 Longmeadow Road 
16 Belknap Road 

25 Lee Road 

49 Pleasant Street 

26 Summer Street 
45 Hospital Road 
14 Juniper Lane 
37 Cypress Street 
1 Camelot Lane 

9 Knollwood Road 

71 Blacksmith Drive 
51 High Street 

18 Johns Avenue 

153 Main Street 

42 Spring Street 
9 Bridge Street 
7 Arnold Drive 

25 Kenney Road 

99 Granite Street 

27 Indian Hill Road 
3 Springvalley Road 

26 Winter Street 
21 Lee Road 

3 Westview Road 
102 Spring Street 
34 Vinald Road 

27 Pound Street 
18 Fox Lane 

37 Bridge Street 

12 Snyder Road 

16 Springvalley Rd. 

90 Adams Street 



27 Country Way 
348 South Street 

24 Hillcrest Road 
22 Hatters Hill Rd. 
18 Fairview Road 



Engineering Specialist 

Homemaker ; 

Husband: Marketing Mgr. 

Social Worker 

Radio News Announcer 

Mental Health Assistant 

Salesman 

Clerk 

Office Manager 

Head Nurse 

Accounting Clerk 

District Sales Manager 

Full Time Student 

Registered Physical 

Therapist 
Electrical Engineer 
Housewife 

Husband: Regional Dir. 
Administrative Assistant 
Husband : Salesman 
Housewife 

Husband: Superintendent 
Medical Transcriptionist 
Polaroid Inc. mechanic 
Waitress 

Husband: Principal Assoc. 
Cost Analyst 

Operations Vice President 
Director of Cost Control 
Staff Accountant 
MIS Analyst 

Superintendent of Engr. 
Unemployed 
Unemployed 
Housewife 
Husband: Assembler 
Owner Sunoco 
Bank Teller 
General Manager 
Sales Representative 
Mgr. of Accounts 

Receivable 
Homemaker 

Husband : Owner Women ' s 
Specialty Store 
C.P.A. Audit Manager 
Insurance Claim 

Supervisor 
Vice J. President 
Mental Health Assistant 
Draftsman 



94 



Bruce G. Macleod 
George J. Maguire 
Robert C. Marshall 
Richard Mastronardi 
Leo J. McCabe 
Susan McClure 
Marinel McGrath 
Jeannie G. McPherson 

Albert J. Menard 
Barbara T. Milligan 

Barbara Monaghan 

Stanley F. Moran 
Althea Nannicelli 
William Nichols 
John T. O'Connell 
Patricia A. Olerich 
Janet M. 0' Toole 
Richard P. Paine 
Margaret W. Paine 
Arthur M. Park 
William J. Pietrusiak 
Helen E. Rohnstock 

Francis Rossi, Jr. 
James A. Ryan 
Anne M. Sarno 
Jeanne Savage 

Maryann Seaman 
Louise A. Sears 

Charles G. Seavey 
Mary C. Seliger 
Kenneth W. Simpson 
Austin T. Smith 
Joyce Smith 
Susan C. Snyder 

Carol M. Strom 

George A. Stuart 
Peter J. Sullivan 
Jean T. Swaim 

Janice M. Suereth 

Mary Jane Timmerman 

Linda Tuttle 
Sandra L. Wallace 

Annamae Ward 

Mary M. Welch 
Joan M. White 

John W. Wiggs 
Robert B. Wot ton 



322 Main Street 
33 Indian Hill Road 
5 Lawrence Court 
12 Green Street 

16 Lantern Lane 

67 North Street 

24 Flint Locke Lane 
53 Rocky Lane 

2 Lowell Mason Road 
5 Noonhill Road 

10 Juniper Lane 

26 Orchard Street 

17 Kamark Drive 

4 Longmeadow 

5 Essex Road 

21 Foundry Street 

31 Pound Street 
338 North Street 
172 Harding Street 

23 Farm Street 

33 Cypress Street 

19 Forest Street 

5 Summer Street 

15 Lantern Lane 
50 Colonial Road 

9 Evergreen Way 

42 Granite Street 

68 Philip Street 

21 Pine Street 

22 Stagecoach Road 
22 Summer Street 

5 Plain Street 

Box 396, Harding St 
2 Longmeadow Road 

2 Grove Street 

199 South Street 
35 Hillcrest Road 
66 Foundry Street 

5 Pine Street 

420 Main Street 

3 Hospital Road 
91 Pleasant Street 

8 Haven Road 

115 High Street 

16 Flint Locke Lane 

64 Sawmill Lane 

20 Grove Street 

95 



Engineering Clerk 

Certified Public Accountant 

Carpenter 

Project Engineer 

Salesman 

Assembly Worker 

Substitute Teacher 

Housewife ; 

Husband : Salesman 

Unemployed 

Partner - The Milligan Company 

Husband: Self employed 

Housewife ; 

Husband: Director of Intl. Div. 

Electrical Engineer 

Administrative Assistant 

National Sales Manager 

Computer Technician 

Unemployed 

Secretary 

President, Comdar Corporation 

Executive Vice President 

Custodian - Swimming Pool Oper. 

Owner & Vice President 

Housewife; 

Husband : Warehouseman 

Cook 

Co-ordinating Marketing 

Bank Re-concilation Clerk 

Homemaker ; 

Husband: Assistant District Mgr 

Homemaker; Spouse, Pub. Acct. 

Office Worker 

Husband: Assistant Controller 

Heavy Equipment Operator 

Customer Service Representative 

Unemployed 

House Painter - Retired 

Administrative Secretary 

Housewife; 

Husband: Director of Finance 

Housewife; 

Husband: Teacher - Jr. High 

Retired 

Unemployed 

Housewife; 

Husband : Insurance Broker 

Housewife; 

Husband: Groundsman 

Food Service Supervisor 

Husband: Custodian 

Junior Clerk-Typist 

Licensing & Order Clerk 

Husband: Sales Representative 

Housewife; 

Husband: Accountant - Treasurer 

Secretary 

Manager ; 

Husband: Sr. Contract Administrator 

Marketing Manager 

Supervisor of Impregnation & 

Pressure Testing 



PUBLIC SCHOOL 
REPORTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1977 



97 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



In contrast to the preceding twelve months, the past year has been one 
of relative stability for Medfield's schools. With the new administration 
settled into place, emphasis has been directed toward development and 
improvement in the system's education program. 

Medfield students today are provided with the most comprehensive 
offerings of programs of study, in history. The "full range" of students is 
now being accommodated. Chapter 766 has been implemented, regular course 
offerings have been upgraded, and programs for the gifted are off the ground. 
IMPACT is making a significant contribution in the latter area. In addition, 
new programs with Dean Junior College and in the Fine Arts provide stimulat- 
ing opportunities. Also, the Tri-County Vocational School is now open and 
indications are that 10 to 15% of Medfield's students will avail themselves of 
the programs in this institution. 

While more is available, more is also being required of Medfield students 
than at any time in history. This year's graduating class - and all future 
classes - will be required to earn 103 credits to qualify for graduation. 
This is more than any previous class and represents the culmination of a 
program adopted three years ago. 

During the past year, steps have been taken to deal with some signifi- 
cant problems facing the system in the areas of physical plant organization 
and projected declining enrollments. Because of past short-comings, it will 
be necessary to repair roofs at two of our school buildings. The expenditure 
of money is unavoidable if we are to keep the physical plant in reasonable 
condition. The organization of the system will be revamped to respond to 
changes being demanded of it. Enrollments are projected to decline signifi- 
cantly in the next few years, and this situation promises to require addition- 
al responsive change from the system and the Town. The possibility of a 
school closing is very real. 

The emphasis on fiscal responsibility also continued in the past year. 
Inflationary influences, along with other demands, are difficult to keep under 
control, but constant attention to these factors will continue to keep the 
school portion of the tax rate at reasonable levels while assuring a sound 
education for Medfield's youngsters. 

This year's report would not be complete without acknowledging citizen 
groups' contributions which are probably the most significant in recent years. 
In addition to the volunteer support organizations, important help was 
provided by ad hoc committees involved in questions regarding redistricting, 
transportation, and computer acquisition and utilization. It is the 
Committee's hope and intent to continue using these fine resources available 
from Medfield. 

John C. Rul&UaJUL, J/i. , CkcuAman 
Thomas McMuA&lLh, \J<Lc(l CkcuAman 
VasvidL R. BcuteA, RzcoidLLng S&cA&ta/iy 
Vcawi I. AuAtZn, VinancJjcdL SacA^taAy 
PhLUp J. Buaa 



98 





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School Committee Members (standing) John C. Rudisill, Jr., Philip J. Burr, 
Thomas McMurtrie, (seated) Dawn I. Austin, Darrel R. Bates 




Mr. Robert Cresto, Superintendent of Schools 



99 



REPORT OF THE 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



To the Members of the School Committee and the Citizens of Medfield: 

It is my privilege to submit this annual report of education in the 
Medfield Public Schools for 1977. The School Committee has set the direction 
through goals and objectives with the Super intedent and, therefore,' has 
established short and long range program development that is fundamental to 
educational excellence. The interest and support of parents and citizens in 
general has continued to assist the school staff in providing the highest 
quality of instruction possible. 

ENROLLMENT STATISTICS 
Ten Year Comparison of Enrollments, October 1 

68-69 69-70 70-71 71-72 72-73 73-74 74-75 75-76 76-77 77-78 



SPED 


10 


12 


14 


16 


12 


11 


17 


13 


16 


18 


Kg. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


181 


183 


187 


174 


158 


1 


243 


235 


229 


247 


221 


203 


201 


185 


194 


177 


2 


227 


235 


220 


223 


240 


212 


205 


192 


192 


201 


3 


249 


233 


233 


232 


224 


218 


218 


211 


192 


197 


4 


225 


259 


235 


238 


246 


209 


215 


212 


208 


195 


5 


204 


237 


248 


236 


249 


251 


210 


221 


216 


219 


6 


219 


222 


236 


253 


237 


247 


253 


225 


226 


230 


7 


197 


228 


227 


244 


251 


230 


250 


255 


232 


226 


8 


188 


210 


234 


236 


248 


242 


227 


250 


245 


225 


9 


178 


194 


209 


240 


235 


233 


235 


219 


240 


203 


10 


160 


177 


201 


207 


232 


231 


220 


230 


218 


217 


11 


148 


172 


165 


193 


203 


221 


227 


212 


226 


197 


12 


116 


155 


169 


149 


183 


188 


207 


215 


205 


227 


Totals 


2364 


2569 


2620 


2714 


2781 


2877 


2868 


2827 


2784 


2690 


Commentary: 





















The 1977-78 incoming first grade class had 28 fewer students than the 
outgoing graduating class in the 1976-77 school year. The Kindergarten pro- 
gram, in its fifth year, enrolled 158 children, or a decrease of 16 from the 
previous year. The overall enrollment in 1977-78 showed a decline of 94 
students from 1976-77. The 2690 enrollment figure reflects a 1% increase of 
students over the original projected enrollment for the year. 

'The Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School, which opened in 
September, enrolled a total of 61 students from Medfield 's allocation of 78 
spaces. Of the students attending, 29 are enrolled in the ninth grade 
Exploratory program and 32 are enrolled in specific service/ trade programs. 
Thirty-nine spaces will be available for ninth grade enrollees each year in 
1978 and 1979, at which time the school will be operating with four grades, 
nine through twelve. 

The overall enrollment outlook appears to be one of gradually decreasing 
enrollments in the next several years. This is predicated upon lower trends 



100 



in the 1970' s of resident births and single-family housing. The upswing in 
the issuance of single-family permits in 1976 and 1977, as well as the 
issuance of permits for multi-family construction and the stabilizing of State 
birth statistics, suggests a careful monitoring of enrollment trends. 

STAFFING . As a result of student enrollment decline and secondary size 
reviews, a reduction of five professional and one-half para-professional 
positions were made prior to Town Meeting. Reduction in clerical and mainte- 
nance time also was realized. Due to Kindergarten enrollment needs for the 
fall, it was necessary to re-institute one-half of a teaching position and 
one-half of an aide. The innovative program for Gifted students also 
required the position of Resource Teacher for the Gifted be established. 
Staffing needs will be reviewed annually in light of enrollment trends and 
educational program needs. 

CURRICULUM . Emphasis on systemwide curriculum development in all subject 
areas continued in the past year. Identified skill sequence in the necessary 
basic skills in Grades K-6 and the continued acquisition and application of 
those skills in the secondary grades have been reviewed by the total 
teaching staff under the direction of Coordinators. Publishing of these 
curriculum guides will occur as each area is completed. Guides will then be 
available for utilization by classroom teachers in planning instruction. In 
the Junior and Senior High Schools, course sequences have been partially re- 
viewed with important modifications made in the English and Social Studies 
elective systems to insure student participation in important skill and con- 
cept areas. Systemwide standards for writing will be implemented in 
September. 

MEASURING ACHIEVEMENT . Prescriptive Diagnostic Testing in Reading and 
Mathematics in Grades 4, 6, and 7 was initiated in October with results 
utilized by teachers to individualize instruction. A thorough review of 
college board test results was realized in the fall. This annual report, 
presented to the School Committee, will be used by the administration and 
staff in relation to needed curriculum modifications and general educational 
practices in the future. 

IMPACT . In Medf ield P_rogram for Academically and Creatively Talented students 
became a reality in October after much planning by a committee of faculty and 
volunteer tutors working with the School Committee and administration. The 
program has served the needs of 38 carefully identified and screened students 
in Grades 5, 6, and 7. 

SPECIAL FUNDING . We are indebted to the Corning Foundation for a special 
grant of $10,000 for the purchase of a Computer designed to serve many needs 
in our school system. Assisted by a group of citizen volunteers, a committee 
of school personnel was able to write specifications for a mini-computer 
system which will introduce to a large number of our high school students the 
basics of computer technology, and will teach interested students basic 
computer programming. It is also planned, in addition to a number of other 
uses, to utilize the computer system for various data processing applications 
to accommodate school system and perhaps Town needs in the future. In 
addition to the Corning Foundation, I would also like to take this opportunity 
to thank the citizens who served on the Computer Planning Advisory Committee. 

Through a CETA grant of $104,112.08 for Project AWARENESS, we have been 
able to offer a program to develop a level of career awareness in Medfield 
students. Aimed at all students within the school system, the program will 



101 



increase their knowledge of occupational choices and career decision-making 
through materials introduced by classroom teachers into the basic instruction 
program. 

Another CETA grant in the amount of $114,966.78 has allowed us to 
initiate Project IMPACT, mentioned previously in this report. The greatest 
part of this grant is being used for salaries of professional and para- 
professional support staff. We are indebted to Ms. Diana Otis, Director of 
the program, and to the groups of teachers and interested citizens who were 
responsible for the initial planning. Also of great assistance has been Dr. 
Gertrude Webb of Curry College, who has served as advisor to the program. 

Under Title IVB of E.S.E.A. we received $18,771.92 to be used for desig- 
nated library resources, textbooks and instructional materials and equipment, 
that will strengthen Language Arts skills throughout the school system. An 
advisory committee of administrative, faculty and citizen members distin- 
guished themselves in developing the program recommendations for the applica- 
tion of the funds. 

A Title I program was funded in the amount of $11,133 to allow the hiring 
of instructional aides in two of our elementary schools. The tutoring 
provided by these aides has proven to be of great value to students requiring 
supplementary instruction in the basic skills. 

The Schools owe a debt of gratitude to the townspeople for the continued 
recognition of the educational needs of our young people. On behalf of all 
the students, I thank you for your vital support. To all the parent associa- 
tions, citizen re-districting and transportation study committees, the 
Superintendent's Community Advisory Council, civic organizations, businessmen 
and town officials, we extend our appreciation for the assistance and coopera- 
tion that has always been apparent. 

The past year has been one of the most challenging and rewarding in my 
educational career. The Medfield community has communicated its feelings 
regarding the quality of education and along with the School Committee, I 
have listened carefully. Some of what the community has designated as prior- 
ities has been accomplished; more is to come. 

I would like to extend my appreciation to the members of the School 
Committee for the continued confidence and cooperation demonstrated toward me, 
as we have worked together to achieve educational excellence in Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RobeAt CieAto 
Superintendent of Schools 



102 



REPORT OF THE 
MEMORIAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I submit the Memorial School Annual Report for 
the year ending December 31, 1977. 

PROGRAMS 

The continuing efforts of the Medfield Schools to strengthen skills in 
written composition has directly involved the primary levels of instruction. 
A new program, purchased with the assistance of federal funds, was introduced 
to Memorial School staff during the in-service training day held in November. 

The successful school volunteer program was expanded as Medfield' s 
senior citizens were invited to serve as school assistants. Senior citizen 
volunteers are now serving as office helpers, story tellers and kindergarten 
aides. 

SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY 

One of the highlights of the year, both for the community and the 
children of the Memorial School, was our first Senior Citizens Day. Medfield '£ 
seniors received personal invitations, toured the facility and visited class- 
rooms during instructional periods. Before leaving, the seniors enjoyed a 
musical concert and refreshments. 

The children of the Memorial School guided their parents, relatives and 
friends through the school and introduced their families to their teachers 
during their annual Open House. 

During the November reporting conferences, more than 400 parents and 
teachers met to review the progress of the children assigned to the Memorial 
School. 

A slide program showing the children of the Memorial School during a 
typical school day was on display at the Medfield Public Library during 
American Education Week. The positive response of parents to this exhibit 
has encouraged us to continue to provide additional opportunities for parents 
to gain information regarding the programs of the Memorial School. 

Parent lunch days were initiated this year to give parents an opportunity 
to join their child for lunch and to share in another aspect of their child's 
school experiences. 

ENROLLMENT 

The enrollment of 371 pupils provides for a ratio of one teacher per 18 
pupils in the kindergarten and one teacher per 22 pupils in grades one to 
three. 

We at the Memorial School, with the continued support of the School 
Committee, the Superintendent, and the parents and school volunteers, are 



103 



most eager to work for the success of our educational programs. 

Respectfully submitted, 
HAjchaxd M. F<utzpcutAlck 
Principal 




Valerie Mariani chats with artist Chuck Ladouceur as he paints a new mural in 
the Memorial School lobby. 



REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

For the fifteenth year it is my pleasure to submit the annual report of 
the Dale Street School for the year ending December 31, 1977. 

PROGRAMS 

The primary focus of this year has been the continuation of the develop- 
ment, growth and improvement of the knowledges and learning skills of each 
student. During the Spring and Summer the staff developed a Language Arts 
program for grade five. This was introduced in September. Also in grade 
five new Social Studies text materials were purchased after a year long 
selection process. An inventory testing program was piloted in Reading, 
grade 4, and Mathematics, grade 6, in October. An improved transitional 
program for students of grade three and six and their parents was developed 
and introduced in the Spring. A Career Awareness program was instituted in 
the Fall for all grades. Curriculum review, study and assessment is 
continuing in all areas. 



104 




Kerry Tate is hard at work during Language Arts class at Dale Street School. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

Both the enrollment and staff have remained essentially stable as to 
numbers. There has been a slight increase in student population compared to 
last year. Two new teachers were hired to replace one teacher who had 
resigned to go to graduate school full time, and one teacher who is on 
maternity leave. Both of these teachers were in the Language Arts area. 

SCHOOL ACTIVITIES 



1. 



3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 



Fire drills were conducted on a regular basis. Most were under the 

supervision of Chief Ryan and were accomplished in an average time of 

one minute and twenty seconds. 

A School Bus Safety Program was instituted which included class time and 

practice of emergency bus evacuation drills for every student. 

The Annual Art and Music Festival was held in May. 

A separate Open House was held for each grade level. 

There was a Parent Visitation Day during American Education Week. 

A full program of intramurals was offered for boys and girls during the 

year. 

Full participation in the Author's Day program. 

A number of major school assemblies for all children. 

Curriculum oriented Field Trips at each grade level. 

Annual Book Fair 

School Field Day for all students in June. 

Grade 6 Activity Day 

Annual Award Assembly 

Implementation of project IMPACT - program for the gifted. 



SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY 

We are fortunate to have the community participate in the educational 
program of the Dale Street School. I wish to thank the many parents and 
friends who have voluntarily given their time and effort to broaden the 



105 



school experiences of the children. A few examples of this positive 
cooperation are: 



Speakers on a variety of subjects in different curricula areas 

Parent assistance in the IMC 

Tutors in Reading 

Parents Advisory Council to the Principal 

The AVIS organization, particularly the Dale Street Committee 

Chaperones for school activities 

Baby sitting courses by parents for grade six students 

Parent organization and supervision of the Book Fair 



I wish to acknowledge the cooperation and assistance given to me by the 
Superintendent, School Committee, the Faculty, and the parents of the Dale 
Street School children during this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Allan K. BelcheA 

Principal 



REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The ninth annual report is being submitted from the Ralph Wheelock 
School for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1977. Our total enrollment as 
of October 3rd was 614 pupils, which represents an increase of four students 
from the previous year. We have a total of 28 classes with an average class 
size of 22 pupils. 

The first grade was divided into four classes. One class specifically 
was smaller in number so that individual attention would be provided to those 
students who needed skill development. 

Where possible, students at the 5th and 6th grade level were scheduled 
during study-activity periods for extra help with their regular classroom 
teachers. A 15-20 minute recess time was also provided during this time 
segment. 

The math classes at Ralph Wheelock School are going "forward with basics 1 
Memorization of facts are being emphasized. The implementation of mini-math 
computers are programmed with facts to reinforce skills. 

The 6th grade classes visited Rocky Woods in the Spring, in a series of 
field trips. This experience was an integral part of a study on Ecology and 
Conservation. Some High School students assisted us in this project. Further 
field trips will be planned to this valuable community resource. 

In Grades 1-3, we instituted a structural sequential program teaching 
composition skills. 

An Oral Communication Skills program was instituted at the 4th grade 



106 



level to develop a student's poise and self-confidence so that they can 
become an active participant in the learning situation. 

In Physical Education, all classes are now co-educational. At the inter- 
mediate level, each student was given the opportunity to select between two 
activities every four weeks. The following year children will be required to 
participate in the opposite activities in the same time period. This pro- 
cedure resulted in a more varied program and better utilization of staff and 
facilities. 

Study skills continues to be emphasized during an assigned study at the 
intermediate level. Our aim is to reinforce skills previously taught in other 
subject areas and to have students learn how to utilize their time effectively 
in the development of good study habits. 




Principal Frank Hoffman discusses new reading series with teachers Kathy 
Belmont and Ann Kristof. 

Some students in the 6th grade participated in a Spanish Conversational 
Course. Plans were also being formulated to offer French. 

One of our major objectives this year was to establish lines of 
communication between school and home. To achieve this goal, we implemented 
three "Open House" evening programs, Parent Visitation Days, scheduled 
Parent-Teacher Conferences (grades K-3) , a Parent Advisory Council, Classroom 
and School Newsletters, Curriculum Program Nights and Progress Reports. 

Parents of all first and second graders were invited to participate in 
the School's Hot Lunch Program. 

Chorus periods were provided for students in grades 4-6. The success of 
their efforts were fully realized by their participation in the Spring Music 
Festivals. 

An "Art Show" demonstrated the creative and artistic talents of children 
in grades K-6. 



107 



Gratitude is extended to the Central Office Administration and School 
Committee for their leadership and assistance. A special note of appreciation 
to the excellent faculty at Wheelock for their support and cooperation in all 
aspects of the total school situation. We are also grateful for the involve- 
ment of coordinators, aides and all other school personnel, volunteers and 
parents. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Flank J. Hodman 

Principal 



REPORT OF THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of the Medfield Junior High School, I respectfully submit 
the annual report for the year ending December 31, 1977. 

The school year 1977-1978 opened with a student enrollment of 663 - 
227 in grade seven, 224 in grade eight, 206 in grade nine, and 6 in the 
Special Education class. Forty of last year's eighth grade class enrolled in 
the newly opened Tri-County Vocational Regional High School. 

New staff members to the Junior High School replacing resigned and re- 
tired teachers include Mr. David Connell-Math, Miss Judy Coppola-Science, 
Mr. Daniel Donovan-Industrial Arts, Miss Barbara Geller-Art, Mrs. Margaret 
McLaughlin-Music, Mrs. Maceon Grayson-Business Education, and Mrs. Jewel 
Knowles-Foreign Languages. 

Mr. John Brann- Industrial Arts, retired in October of this year after ten 
years of service to the Medfield Schools. 

Mr. James W. O'Connell resigned in October after six years as Principal 
of the Medfield Junior High School to accept a position as Assistant Superin- 
tendent of Schools in Holliston. Mr. Douglas Ide, Assistant Principal for the 
past two years, was appointed Principal in late Nqvember. 

The Science Department introduced a modified version of the Introductory 
Physical Science course to accommodate the learning style and needs of 
students with learning disabilities. 

The Industrial Arts Department expanded their offerings to include The 
World of Construction and Power Technology. These programs were made possible 
by a $17,000.00 Federal Grant in 1976-1977. 

The Physical Education Department has introduced more co-ed activities 
including ping pong, volleyball, jogging, and cross-country skiing. 

The system-wide Career Resource Center opened at the Junior High School 
under the direction of Mr. Robert Lynch. The materials and services are 



108 



available for use by all students and teachers. 

A program for academically talented and gifted students, IMPACT, has been 
started at the Junior High School under the direction of Miss Diana Otis and 
presently involves fifteen seventh grade boys and girls. 

The Student Council again conducted a successful fund raising activity 
through the sale of magazine subscriptions. The council sponsored a teacher 
appreciation day in December where they pinned a white carnation on all staff 
members including teachers, secretaries, custodians cafeteria workers, and 
administrators. 

The Junior High School extra curricular activities continued to expand 
this year with such new activities as intramural street hockey, cross-country 
skiing, tennis, early morning Jogging Club, Art Service Club, Industrial Arts 
Maintenance Club, and Rocket Club. 




Liz Talerman,, Sally Bertolet Marcia Sullivan and Ann Fitzgerald enjoy new art 
display in the Junior High School lobby. 

The students and faculty joined together to conduct an all day Field Day 
in late June. The events consisted of track and field as well as team sports. 

The Junior High School received $1,000.00 from the School Committee to be 
used to beautify the school and help foster pride in our school. Through a 
student-faculty committee and school-wide contest it was decided to dress up 
the Cafeteria with curtains. These were installed last spring. 

In conclusion, the Junior High School has enjoyed a very good year. We 
are very fortunate to have such a fine staff, supportive parents, cooperative 
students, and a community that values and supports excellence in education. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. Vouglcu> Ida 

Principal 



109 



REPORT OF THE 
AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of Medfield High School, I respectfully submit our Annual 
Report for the year ending December 31, 1977. 

The official enrollment for the High School this year was 641. There 
were 204 graduates in the class of 1977. Of these, 62% went on to a four- 
year college; 16% to a two-year college; 3% to other post-high school insti- 
tutions of higher education; 19% entered the world of work. 

We have made many strides in improving the curriculum offerings at our 
High School. During this school year, we have introduced five new courses: 

English Department Independent Reading 

Bible In Literature 

Practical Speech 

Chemistry Department Advance Placement Chemistry 

Art Department Crafts II 

This is the first year that our Guidance Department published a manual 
entitled "College Planning Handbook." Our Guidance staff met with parents and 
interested Junior students for an orientation regarding college planning. 

Members of our staff have been working closely with the Business Manager 
and volunteer community consultants in preparing bids for the new computer we 
hope to purchase for our school supported by a Corning Grant. 

We have been more than pleased with the results of our "Operation 
Adventure" which is a program conducted by our Physical Education Department. 
Many of our students seem excited about the program and have already partici- 
pated in it. 

The Administrators, Coordinators, and Department Heads have been studying 
the area of competency testing. We are also working with the State Department 
of Education in this project. 

Our staff has been working closely with the Director of Special Services 
and his staff assisting them as they work with our students in the area of 
career information and planning. 

Our Director of Special Services reports that with the SAT scores falling 
across the nation for at least eight years, Medfield did not experience the 
decline until four years ago and in the 1977 results for college-bound seniors, 
Medfield has actually reversed the trend. Medfield' s SAT scores are 30 points 
better than the national and state means. 

Our Student/Faculty/Parent Advisory Committee, the Faculty Executive 
Board, and the Academic Standards Committee have been most helpful by meeting 
on a regular basis during this past school year and making many recommendations 
to the administration of our school. 

110 



I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Medfield School 
Committee, the Superintendent, the Business Manager, and the many parent 
groups for their continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T<Li>A06 P. ¥WLtd&> 

Principal 




Electronics teacher Ralph LeClere demonstrates soldering techniques to High 
School students Philip Markowski and John Drahos. 



111 



GRADUATION EXERCISES OF 

MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 

CLASS of 1977 



SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 1977 4:00 P.M. 

PROGRAM 

Processional Class of 1977 

Medfield High School Band 
Douglas Godfrey, Director 

MARSHALS 
Charles Fuller Brock Sonya Ellen Keene 

Invocation The Reverend Robert T. Gregg 

The National Anthem Medfield High School Band 

Welcome Charles Robert Mascari, President, Class of 1977 

Message to Graduation Class Robert Cresto, Superintendent of Schools 

HONOR ESSAYS 

Elizabeth Ann Alexander Linda Marie Netherton 

SELECTIONS BY THE GLEE CLUB AND SPECIAL CHORUS 

Presentation of Class Gift Gary Brent Galeucia 

Vice President, Class of 1977 

Presentation of Student Council Scholastic Awards John Marshall Fralin 

President, Student Council 

Presentation to the American Field Service 

Representative Grant Edward Tweddle, A.F.S.,New Zealand William R. Reagan 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen 

Presentation from the Mayor of Bedfordshire, 
South Africa to the Chairman of 
Medfield' s Board of Selectmen Mark Stanley Mayfield 

Presentation of Awards Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 

Harvard Prize Book 
D.A.R. Certificate 
Bausch & Lomb Science Award 
Official Inaugural License Plates Awards 

Edward B. Keyes School Spirit Award Mrs. Patricia M. Jones 

President, Boosters Club 

Presentation of Scholarships 

Hannah Adams Women's Club Mrs. Lennard T. Swanson 

Medfield Lions Club Henri E. Hansotte, President 

Chisholm-Weir Memorial Scholarship Mr. and Mrs. Christian Weir 

and Mrs. Barbara Chisholm 
Robert Luke Memorial Scholarship Richard DeSorgher, Medfield Youth Center 



112 



Medfield Teachers Association 
American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 



George Callahan, President 
Charles W. Higgins 
Scholarship Chairman 
American Legion Auxiliary, Beckwith Post No. 110 Mr. Paul E. Hinkley 
Medfield Police Association Kevin W. Robinson, President 

Medfield Jaycees Stephen Buckley, Jr., President 

Medfield Jaycee-ettes Mrs. Carol Wilgus and Mrs. Dianne Orpen 

Corning Glass Company John C. Rudisill, Jr. 

Manager-Manufacturing Operations 
Westinghouse Education Foundation Family Scholarship Paul Chaisson 

Manager of Personnel Relations 
The National Secretaries Association Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 

Medfield Chapter of the National Honor Society Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 
Naval R.O.T.C. Scholarship Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 



Presentation of American Legion Medals 



Charles W. Higgins 
Scholarship Chairman 



SELECTIONS BY THE MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL CONCERT BAND 
Presentation of Diplomas 

John C. Rudisill, Jr., Chairman, Medfield School Committee- 



Robert Cresto, Superintendent of Schools 

Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 

Benediction 

Recessional 

Consecration of the House 



Message to the Seniors 



The Reverend Paul E. Norcross 



Beethoven 



CLASS OF 1977 



*Elizabeth Ann Alexander 
Karen Lee Allan 
Barbara Gordon Allen 
David Wayne Anderson 

*Nancy Rae Anderson 

*Barry Brush Anes 
Kathleen Diane Armacost 

*Elizabeth Grace Armstrong 
David Shattuck Arzberger 
Terence Carson Baber 
Melissa Anne Bailey 
Michaelene Susan Bartnik 
Robin Ellen Bates 
Randy Jay Baxendale 
Susan Elizabeth Beauregard 
Frank Bernardo 
Cynthia Suzanne Beverage 
Laurence Henry Bouvier 
Catherine Jayne Bowman 
Cynthia Lynn Bowman 
Michael Joseph Brady 
Peter Charles Bratsos 
Brian Kenneth Budwey 



Brian Joseph Burgess 

Mark Charles Burgess 
*Michael Scott Bush 

Patricia Calo 
*John Robert Campbell 

Patricia Marie Capone 

Kristin Lyn Carlson 

Michael Edward Carroll 

Charles Joseph Coffone 

Michael Edward Colbourn 

Paul Charles Colella 
*James A. Connor 
*Charlene Elizabeth Cosgrove 

Kathi Jo Couper 

Lorraine D'Angelo 

David Mark Daniels 

Glenn Parker Davey 

William John Davis 

Dorene Patricia DeLuca 

Ann DeMartino 

Beverly Lynne Dennis 

Lynda Elaine Doherty 

Stephen C. Doran 



113 



*Priscilla Ann Doucette 

Denise Louise Dunn 

Christina Marie Ekstrom 

Susan Elaine Estep 

Marc Paul Fabbo 

Gregory James Feehan 

Scott Malcolm Ferguson 

Elizabeth Jean Ferran 

Edwina Anne Flaherty 

Sherrie Lou Fowler 

John Marshall Fralin 

Robin M. Friend 

Susan Mary Fuhrman 

Martha Louise Gabelhart 

Gary Brent Galeucia 

Karin Lyn Gallagher 

Kathleen Marie Gallagher 

Michael A. Gavrilles 

Sherry Ann Green 

Sharon Louise Griffin 
*Michael Joseph Guenette 

Kimberli Ann Haigh 

Nadine Ann Hallal 

Christopher Lawrence Hallinan 

James Grant Hamilton 

Marie Terese Haney 

John David Hanners 
*Karen Deanne Hannula 

Michelle Patrice Hansotte 

Barbara Fran Harrington 

Mary Angela Harrison 
*Michele Elizabeth Hart 

Brent Douglas Harwood 

Frank David Hayes 

William M. Heyer, Jr. 

Donald Peter Himebaugh 

Richard John Holmquist, Jr. 

Richard Dexter Horton 
*Monica Mary Hurd 
*Donald Stanford Ingold 

Jene Lee Johnson 

Stephen Collins Johnson 
*Mark Andrew Juda 
*William Francis Kearns 

Cynthia R. Kellner 
*Amy Margaret Kelly 

Charles Andrew Kenney 

Katherine Brewer Kenyon 

Robert Benjamin Kerekon 

Thomas Werner Kiessling 
*Elizabeth Ann Kilmer 

Bryan Kenneth Kinhart 

Patricia Anne Knowles 

Kurt Wesley Kobel 

Jennifer Ann Kolsti 

Robert Frank LaPlante 

Michelle Anne LeBoeuf 

Allan Leeser Lehmann 



Thomas Lennon 

Mary Elizabeth Logue 

Tobi Jean Lomker 

Mary Elizabeth Love 

Kevin Stuart Lyall 
* James Gill is Lynn 

Anne-Marie Lyons 

Thomas Edward MacDonald 

Glenn Perry MacKenzie 
*Deborah Anne Maini 

William Karl Mann 

Robert Fred Maples, Jr. 

Allison Brooke March 

Joy Frances Marinella 

Benjamin Holt Martin 

Charles Robert Mascari 

Leslie Ruth Matz 
*Mark Stanley Mayfield 

Timothy Paul Mc Car rick 

John Joseph McCarthy 

Nancy Beth McDowell 

Joseph Hugh McGonagle 

Sheryl Dianne McGue 

Edward F. McMahon 

James Paul McMillan 

Kathleen Joan McMillan 

Mary Edith McMillan 

Cheryl Ann Meader 

Mark Carl Mellea 

Nancy Ellen Moran 

Christie Gloria Morris 
*Charles Chester Morse 

Patricia Ann Munroe 

Scott William Munroe 

Edward Nicholas Murray 

Peter David Ness 
*Linda Marie Netherton 

Michael Richard Nickerson 

Jeanne Elizabeth Nightingale 

James Martin Nolan, Jr. 

Margaret Ann Norton 

Mary Clare 0' Grady 

Stephen Byron Olerich 

Kathy Lee Olson 

Ronald Paul Osiek 

John Thomas f Toole 

Sandra Lee Owen 

David William Parmigiane 
*Paul Vincent Phelan 

Donald Emerson Phipps 

Patricia Marie Plante 

Thomas Richard Poor 

Edwin Alan Portmann 

Carol Lee Potts 
*Mary Ellen Potts 

David John Raff in 

Kimberlie Alyn Randlett 

Richard Lawrence Ray 



114 



Michael Sean Reardon 
Peter Howlett Reinemann 
David Arthur Rieger 
Bryan Richard Ripley- 
James Francis Ripley 
Richard Michael Rogers 
Francis David Rossi, Jr. 
Jean Marie Sacchetine 
Mark L. St. Pierre 
Caryl Beth Salisbury 
Malcolm Mathew Seaman 
Andrew Thomas Sena tore 
Douglas Brian Sharp 
Gale Marie Sinatra 
Brian Douglas Stetson 

*Nancy Jane Sullivan 
Thomas Donald Sullivan 

*Timothy Patrick Sullivan 
Allison Aldrich Thomas 
Patrick Allen Thompson 
Lisa Jean Tiberi 



Kathleen Clare Tighe 
Karen Ann Tilton 

*Vasiliki Trantopoulos 
Christina Marie Tray 
Robert Louis Tulloch 
Kathleen Robin Tuttle 
Grant Edward Tweddle-A.F. S 

*Keith Richard Ulrich 

*Michael Anthony Urban 
Richard Vietze 

^Deborah Anne Walker 
Lorraine Louise Weiker 
Elizabeth Renae White 

*Mark David Whiting 
Frederick Charles Wicker 
Charles Bartlet Wiggs 
Laura Lee Williams 

^Catherine Mary Wisniewski 
Joan Marie Woodlock 
Wendy Jeane Wotitzky 

*Lynda Wynn 



^Members of the National Honor Society Medfield Chapter 

REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL SERVICES 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with great pleasure that I submit my fourth annual report on the 
accomplishments of the Special Services Department in 1977. In my 1976 report 
I expressed confidence that central office changes would bring continued 
support for special needs programming and greater assistance in financial 
areas. This expectation has been gratefully realized. 

The census of students with special needs has shown some decline overall 
with a decrease in the number of students placed outside public school 
programs. There has been a decrease in the budget as a result of this de- 
creased enrollment. 

Guidance services have been the subject of discussion at all levels with 
plans having been developed to reorganize the services along functional lines. 
It is hoped that this reorganization will occur as of September 1978. 

Testing and screening programs have also undergone changes in 1977. 
Diagnostic reading and mathematics testing were instituted at the fourth, 
sixth, and seventh grade levels. Achievement testing has been re-scheduled 
to the end of the school year, where previously it had been administered in 
the Fall. 

For the second year, the vision and hearing screening programs have been 
completed by Thanksgiving. This service is an example of the excellent cooper- 
ation between school personnel, the school nurses in particular, and the AVIS 
volunteers. 



115 




School Nurse Nancy Kashalena checks the height of Gary Ellis with the help of 
Jay Stonefield and Kevin Tefft. 

In Addition to the normal health services provided by the school nurses, 
there were three immunization programs conducted in 1977. In anticipation of 
a flu epidemic, a flu clinic was arranged for school personnel and the school 
nurses assisted the Medfield Visiting Nurses in a townwide flu clinic. The 
state-mandated Mantoux testing for tuberculosis, which must be conducted 
every three years for all persons coming into contact with school-age 
children, was completed with the assistance of the Visiting Nurses and two 
volunteer nurses. The largest clinic ever held in Medfield was conducted for 
the recent outbreak of measles by the School Nurses, the Visiting Nurses, and 
Dr. James Sullivan. 

The pre-school screening program conducted annually with the assistance 
of the Medfield Lions' Club was enhanced this year by the addition of six 
interns from the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary who assisted Dr. Meagher, 
Clair Grueter, Madeleine Harding, the School Nurses and Lions members. 

1977 brought the first two classes of students to the Tri-County 
Regional Vocational Technical School. Through the efforts of Mr. Robert 
Lynch, the Career Counselor, a smooth transition for Medfield students into 
the Tri-County Program was made. 

In general, 1977 was a year of stabilization in the Core Evaluation 
Process under Chapter 766 with changes taking place in other services not 
directly involved in education special needs students. 

All members of the Special Services Staff look forward to your second 
full year as the leader of the Medfield School Community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

KdVAji J. Ftynn 

Director of Special Services 



116 



REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF MEDIA SERVICES 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is a pleasure once again to have the opportunity to submit an annual 
report to the townspeople of Medfield. Our library/IMCs are providing 
adequate services to students and teachers in spite of the economic restraints 
we are all feeling. 

In the area of program, we are now conducting instructional classes in 
library skills on a formal basis from kindergarten through sixth grade. On 
the secondary level, these classes occur at the request of the teacher as 
needed, or instruction is given on an individual basis by the librarian. 

In addition to the instructional program, the library/IMCs are open 
throughout the school day where we have the personnel, and are otherwise 
closed only as required by contract. We are providing the entire spectrum of 
library services, as well as audiovisual services, including equipment, 
material, and production assistance, and instructional assistance for teachers 
in this area. Audiovisual services are limited, however, as we are limited in 
numbers of personnel to perform the double duties of librarian and media 
specialist. At nearly 2700 students, and a large number of faculty and staff, 
our ratio of approximately 590 clients per librarian is extremely high. 

We in Medfield are also moving away from the "IMC Concept" to which we 
committed ourselves several years ago. This concept, put briefly, is the 
placement of all instructional materials excluding only texts and workbooks, 
in a central location with the provision of professional staff, capitalizing 
on the resulting lack of duplication, permanent availability, and ease of 
location afforded by this method of organization. In more recent years, due 
to lack of personnel, reductions in space, and reductions in budget, these 
materials and equipment have increasingly been purchased by individual depart- 
ments. This is leading to a loss of the previous headway made toward the more 
efficient and economic methods of providing instructional materials. Further 
reductions in these areas may achieve short-range economics, but will cost the 
system a great deal more in the long range, and in the meantime that cost will 
be felt in the less efficient usage of the materials and equipment. 

Last year I was asked to appear before the School Committee regarding the 
usage of the High School library/IMC. As part of my responses to the committee, 
there are several notes I think should be made in general. IMC usage depends 
primarily upon two factors: the demand by teachers for research, reference, 
and writing; and the atmosphere within the library/IMC. More often than not, 
through the cold months last year, the High School IMC has been well below 
64°; it has little or no acoustical control; it is made up of two rooms which 
are unsupervisable short of physical presence - our librarian and half-time 
aide find it difficult to assist in one room and supervise another; and until 
this year there was no means of light control to exclude the extreme glare of 
snow in the courtyard of that building. And yet, under these conditions, the 
average outside circulation of this IMC was 48 items per day*; the average 
number of students per day (exclusive of class groups) was 161 students 
(indicating heavy usage of materials within the room); and 236 class groups 
were brought to the IMC during the year, either for class work or for instruc- 
tion by the librarian and/or the teacher. 



117 



The same kind of usage exists throughout the system, and indicates 
primarily an extremely heavy "Student load" for our library staff. The 
figures for each school, with detail, are available at my office; however, 
the school-wide averages can be given here: 



4. 



Average number of students per day 
Total classes (in addition to above) 
Average "outside" circulation/day 

(does not include materials used within 
the IMC) 
Total inventory, kindergarten to 12 

(14 items per student) . 



147 

1,038 

88 



38,047 



I would like to express again my gratitude to the library volunteers who 
donate many hours to do necessary but not often glamorous tasks; to the 
librarians and library aides, who are dedicated to their students and teachers 
far beyond the norm; and to the community which has continually included among 
the "basics" good school library services. 

I would also like again to invite the public to use our library facilities 
and collections, and remind them that we are open for them as well as for the 
students from the first bell in the morning to the last in the afternoon. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Van E. Hogan 

Director of Media Services 

*A11 figures are from the 1976-77 annual statistical report. 




Library volunteer, Janet Haxton, helps her daughter Laurie find some books at 
the Memorial School library. 



118 



REPORT OF THE BUSINESS MANAGER 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I am pleased to submit the second annual report of the Medfield Public 
School's Business Manager. 

The operations and service functions of the Medfield Schools have been 
organized under the supervision of the Business Manager during the past year. 
Specific objectives for each department have been developed to insure con- 
tinued improvement in the system in concert with fiscal responsibility. 
Special Needs transportation services have been enhanced through participation 
in collaborative bidding with ten other communities. In addition, the school 
system was able to reduce the number of school buses used due to declining 
enrollment and improved scheduling procedures. Currently, a citizen study 
committee continues to work with the administration to develop alternatives 
to the present transportation plan. 

The safety of our student passengers remains the highest priority. To 
this end, the system has; conducted bus evacuation drills for all students, 
reviewed and adjusted routes, participated in driver training sessions, and 
developed policy to address special transportation needs. 

Community use of school facilities has increased considerably during the 
past twelve months. A revised application and scheduling procedure has 
eliminated conflicts and established a priority of use which better serves all 
community groups of Medfield. The department is pleased with citizen response 
and grateful for the cooperation of all using groups. 

The School System continues to implement new and revised purchasing 
practices. Equipment purchases have been shared with other governmental 
bodies in order to minimize capital expenditures of the town. Competitive 
bidding for supplies and services has been greatly expanded resulting in 
favorable pricing options for the school system. 

Monitoring of school finances is an on-going process. External audits of 
all State and Federal Grants, school lunch services and pupil transportation 
services have been conducted during the past six months. Detailed analysis of 
per-pupil costs and various program budgets have provided valuable input into 
current budget development. 

In June of 1977 the Medfield School Committee adopted a 4.5 million 
dollar budget representing a 2.8% increase over the previous fiscal period. 
Budget development for the 1978-79 school year continues at this time under 
the direction of the Superintendent. 

Vandalism to school property has decreased dramatically during the year. 
Detailed accounting of incidents reflects a 42% decrease in expenditures due 
to vandalism since July 1977. The addition of a Security Aide position through 
the C.E.T.A. program has provided valuable assistance in reducing the 
incidence of vandalism. 



119 



Several personnel changes have taken place within the school operations 
areas. Mrs. Priscilla Clarke retired from her position of High School 
Secretary after 16 years of dedicated service. Mrs. Deborah Kuhlman was 
appointed Manager of the High School Cafeteria and C.E.T.A. personnel have 
been hired to fill two vacancies on the custodial staff. 

Activities of the Maintenance and School Lunch Programs are filed in 
separate reports to provide greater detail. 

The dedication and cooperation of the Bookkeepers, Clerical Staff, 
Cafeteria Workers and Custodians have contributed greatly to the growth of th« j 
school system. I am most appreciative of their efforts and the support of the 
School Committee, Superintendent, Town Officials, and Citizens. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kua&qZI A. Vovznzmi 

Business Manager 



REPORT OF MEDFIELD ADULT EDUCATION 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

January 19, 1977 was the beginning of the second semester of the 1976-77 | 
Adult Education Program. A total of twenty-five classes in twenty-one 
different courses were continued by the Director. The courses continued were 
Flower Arrangement, Clothing I, Clothing II, Yoga, Advanced Flower Arranging, 
Amateur Photography, Belly Dance, Bridge I, Shorthand, Quilting, Needlepoint, 
Tole, Tennis, Slimnastics, Gym, Woodworking, Drawing, Painting I and II, 
Advanced Typing, and Driver Education. Courses discontinued were 
Conversational French, Craft Boutique, Decoupage, Macrame, and Automotive 
Maintenance. All courses were offered on either Tuesday, Wednesday, or 
Thursday evenings between 7:00 and 10:00 p.m. 

The 1977-78 Adult Education Program followed a highly successful program 
in 1976-77 by offering thirty-two different courses. Twenty-one of these 
courses were established, with double offerings in Woodworking, Tennis, CPR 
and Driver Education. New courses established were CPR and Backgammon. 422 j 
people registered for the twenty-one courses. An additional 111 students 
were enrolled for the Driver Education Program in January 1977. 

Some of the more popular courses this past year were Driver Education, 
Drawing, Woodworking, Tennis, Flower Arranging, Tole Painting, Slimnastics 
and CPR. These courses reached the maximum enrollment the first night of 
registration. 

This year we requested and were granted State funds to help support the 
Adult Education Program. 



120 



Achievement Night for the 1977-78 Adult Education Program will be held on 
Thursday, April 13, 1978, from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the High School. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Cuoco, Jn,. 

Director 

REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my second report as the Athletic Director for the 
year ending December 31, 1977. The Junior and Senior High interscholastic 
program is considered an integral part of the schools curriculum. 

Interscholastic teams were fielded in football, field hockey, basketball, 
baseball, and softball at the Junior High School. Following is the Junior 
High coaching staff: 



Football Eighth and Ninth Grades 

Field Hockey Freshman 

Basketball Seventh and Eighth Grades 

Basketball Freshman (Boys) 

(Girls) 

Baseball Seventh and Eighth Grades 

Baseball Freshman 

Softball Freshman 



George Calimeris 
Thomas Burr 
Suzanne Moulton 
Robert Conlon 
Gary Stockbridge 
Suzanne Moulton 
Richard Desorgher 
David Gibbs 
George Calimeris 



Interscholastic teams at the High School for the girls were fielded in: 
field hockey, soccer, volleyball, cross country, basketball, gymnastics, soft- 
ball, tennis, and cheerleading. Boys' teams competed in football, soccer, 
cross country, basketball, winter track, baseball, spring track, tennis, golf 
and the new sport of ice hockey. 



Following is the High School coaching staff: 



Field Hockey 
Football 

Boys Cross Country 
Girls Cross Country 
Volleyball 
Boys Soccer 

Girls Soccer 

Indoor Track 



(Varsity) 

(J.V.) 

(Varsity) 

(J.V.) 



Nancy Kelley 

Lisa Mastropieri 

William Young — Head Coach 

Gary Youlden — Assistant Coach 

David Gibbs 

Robert Belmont 

Bernard Shea 

Judith Noble 

Thomas Cowell — Head Coach 

Ralph LeClere — Assistant Coach 

Pat Scarsciotti-Head Coach 

Philip Peterson-Assist. Coach 

Paul Staruk 



121 



Boys Basketball 

Girls Basketball 

Gymnastics 
Ice Hockey 
Baseball 

Softball 

Spring Track 

Girls Spring Track 

Girls Tennis 

Boys Tennis 

Golf 

Cheer leading I & II 



(Varsity) 
(J.V.) 
(Varsity) 
(J.V.) 



(Varsity) 
(J.V.) 
(Varsity) 
(J.V.) 



David Gibbs 

Gordon Hodne 

Thomas Co well 

Georganne Iverson 

Mary Robbins 

James Morgan 

Gary Stockbridge 

William Toof 

Suzanne Moulton 

John Nichols 

Robert Belmont — Head Coach 

Paul Staruk — Assist. Coach 

Bernard Shea 

Bonnie Totman 

Richard Connolly 

James Sproul 

Judith Noble 

Leslie Morgan 



All of the High School teams competed in the Tri-Valley League, except 
for the girls soccer team, which competed as an independent. The boys soccer 
team won the league championship and the girls completed an excellent indepen- 
dent schedule at 10-2-1. Both teams qualified for the state tournament and 
played well. The football team completed a 7-2-1 season, the best since 1969. 
The winter season had the Big Blue Basketball team qualifying for the tourna- 
ment once again, and the ice hockey team completed a tough schedule with 
excellent fan support. The spring season saw the baseball team qualify for 
the tournament and play an excellent North Reading team. 

The year ending sports banquet, sponsored by the Medfield School Boosters, 
saw a record number of participants receive certificates and letters. Scholar 
Athlete awards were presented to Nancy Sullivan and Michael Nickerson, and the 
Edward Keyes Scholarship Award went to likable Fred Wicker. 

This year has shown excellent student participation in our interscholastic 
program. The program appreciates the towns support and attendance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GcwiqjX S. Voulden 

Athletic Director 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I submit this annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1977. 

In September, the price of lunch was increased to fifty cents (approved 
by the State) due to the higher price of food, non-foods, and labor. 



122 



Due to the decrease of the price of milk from the dealer, cartons of 
milk are sold to the students for four cents. Once a week students have a 
choice of chocolate or white milk with their meal or an a-la-carte purchase. 

In an effort to increase lunch participation, the Department has 
acquainted parents with the program. In the elementary level, parents were 
invited to join their children for lunch. Another method of stimulating 
parental interest was the serving of school-lunch type desserts at the Fall 
Open House programs. With the goal of teaching students more about School 
Food Service, an "Eater's Advisory Team" is being formed. Student's partici- 
pation will include helping to plan menus. 

The supply of Government commodities has consisted mainly of hamburg, 
cheese, peanuts and margarine. Although there is a service and freight 
charge, these commodities are a great saving to the School Lunch Program. 

The Senior Citizen Lunch Program was increased. Lunches previously 
served only at Dale Street are now also served at the High School, at the 
current price of fifty cents. 

Parents with hardships are continually urged to inquire about the Free 
and Reduced Price Lunch Program. At present, we are serving ninety-six 
students under this plan. 



Our Cafeteria employees continue to make an invaluable contribution of 
service to our program. This year they viewed the "Heimlick Maneuver" filmi 
through which each learned and demonstrated their ability to perform this 
life-saving technique, should an emergency arise. 




Cafeteria employees, Anna Murphy and Debbie Kuhlman, 
High School kitchen. 



prepare lunches at the 



Corning Glass Company made a generous donation to our Department of 225 
place settings of Corelle Livingware China plus assorted serving pieces. This 
courtesy was another of their many contributions to our school system, for 
which we are grateful. 



123 



It was our pleasure to once again give assistance to students and the 
Music Boosters for their annual fund-raising dinner. Being asked to cater the 
Senior Class Banquet for the third year was the Department's honor. 

Achievement in the Lunch Program is due in great part to the continued 
support and assistance of the School Committee, Superintendent, Business 
Manager, Cafeteria Staff, Custodial Staff, and other personnel, for which I 
thank each and every one. 

Respectfully submitted, 

VoHGthy E. AveAy 

School Lunch Director 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 
OF BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is a pleasure to submit my ninth annual report as Director of Build- 
ings and Grounds for the year ending December 31, 1977. 

The following is a compilation of repairs, replacements, additions and 
preventive maintenance projects accomplished during the year: 

SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Installed two new outside doors 

Installed new ceiling in walk- in refrigerator 

Repaired and repainted walls in walk-in refrigerator 

Calibrated heating system including the replacement of many steam traps, 

thermostats, and controls 
Fainted all outside doors 

Replacement of many tiles in corridor ceilings 
Repaired and painted all partitions in gang toilets 
Painted kitchen and teachers 1 lounge 
Rebuilt baseball field 
Painted exterior of building 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Painted kitchen ceiling 
Painted teachers' room 
Painted all toilet ceilings 
Painted all outside doors 
Repaired eight cafeteria tables 
Replaced floor tile Where needed 
Repaired sprinkler system-football field 
Rebuilt girls' baseball field 
Replaced one toilet bowl 



124 



DALE STREET SCHOOL 

Painted exterior of building 
Repaired 24 auditorium folding benches 
Replaced water feed valve on boilers 
Replaced several steam traps in univents 

MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

Painted front entrance and all outside doors 
Installed three new outside doors 
Installed new hot water line to dishwasher 
Replaced hot water mixing valve 
Rebuilt return water valve for boilers 
Replaced floor tile where needed 

WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

Calibrated heating system including the replacement of several thermo- 
stats, valves and controls 
Rebuilt three hot water circulating pumps 
Replaced two oil lines for boilers 
Repaired folding doors on stage 
Rebuilt baseball field 
Repaired and refinished toilet partitions 

ALL SCHOOLS 

Repaired all fences and baseball backstops 

Repainted all roadway markings and parking lines 

Replacement of glass and repair of other damage caused by vandalism 

Painted all flagpoles and football goal posts 

Repaired scoreboard and time clock 

Loamed, seeded, fertilized all fields 

Sprayed all fields with broadleaf and insect control 

Burners, boilers, smokepipes, chimneys and fire boxes all cleaned and 

repaired 
Locker rooms, and receiving room floors all painted 
Gym floors, bleachers, and stages all varnished 
Purchased new truck and plow 

Supplied small refrigerators to Nurses' office in all schools 
Continued shade replacemnt program in all schools 
Roadway gates constructed at the Junior/ Senior High School Complex 

In addition to the specifics listed above, the Maintenance Department was 
happy to provide assistance to all school athletic functions, festivals, and 
shows, and to other community groups making use of the buildings. I am 
grateful for the support given to me by my entire staff. Sincere appreciation 
is extended to the School Committee, Superintendent, and Business Manager for 
their cooperation and assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Hatwld VtuJjovii 

Director of Buildings and Grounds 



125 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 
VITAL STATISTICS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1977 



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138 



TOWNOFMEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in 
Town affairs, to meet at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Monday, 
the twenty-eighth day of March, A. D., 1977, at 6:00 A.M., then and there to 
act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually by 
ballot, viz: 

One Moderator, one Trustee of the Public Library, one member of the 
Park and Recreation Commission and one member of the Housing Authority 
for one year. 

One Trustee of the Public Library for two years. 

One Selectman, one Assessor, two members of the School Committee, 
two Trustees of the Public Library, one Collector of Taxes, two 
members of the Park and Recreation Commission, all for three years. 

One member of the Housing Authority for four years 

One member of the Planning Board for five years. 

The polls will be opened at 6:00 A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-fifth day of April, A.D., 1977, commencing at 7:30 P.M. 
the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury School 
gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: 

Articles 2 through 45 will appear with the report of the Adjourned 
Town Meeting, April 25, 1977. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof 
in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least 
before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, 
unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this first day of March, A. D., Nineteen Hundred and 
Seventy-seven . 

R. EdwaAd B&aAd 
iJJUJUam R. Reagayi 
Hcwiy A. KellzkzA 

Selectmen of Medfield 

139 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. 

By virtue of this warrant I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for 
the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said warrant in not less 
than five public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven days before 
the time of holding the meeting. 

Hob&vt V. Roy 
Constable of Medfield 



A true copy attest: 

HOLYlcy J. VfWAtOYl 

Town Clerk 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

TOWN ELECTION, MARCH 28, 1977 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the meeting was opened at 6:00 A.M. by 
the reading of the warrant through Article 1. The ballot boxes were checked 
and found to be in working order, voting lists displayed and instructions to 
voters and specimen ballots posted within the polling place. 

The following persons were sworn in and assigned to their Precincts: 

PRECINCT ONE: Warden, John Ganley; Clerk, Florence Roberts; Checkers, 
Mary MairEtienne and Maybelle Maguire. 

PRECINCT TWO: Warden, Elizabeth Ippoliti; Clerk, Muriel Harris; Checkers, 
Mary Lovell and Margaret Bernick. 

PRECINCT THREE: Warden, Elmer Portmann; Clerk, Clara DeNucci; Checkers, 
Beatrice Bangs and Margaret Marr. 

PRECINCT FOUR: Warden, Phyllis Wilmarth; Clerk, Anna Murphy; Checkers, 
Phyllis Ripley and Marion Bosselman. 

The polls were declared closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote cast was 1874. This number included 28 absentee ballots. 

The tabulation and counting of ballots cast was as follows: 



140 







PRECINCTS 






MODERATOR - 1 year 


1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


Ralph C. Copeland 


308 


430 


412 


420 


1570 


Blanks 


75 


83 


60 


86 


304 


LIBRARY TRUSTEE - 1 year 












Ann B. Thompson 


313 


435 


418 


421 


1587 


Blanks 


70 


78 


54 


85 


287 


HOUSING AUTHORITY - 1 year 












Raymond Cynewski 


42 


15 


11 


19 


87 


Scattered 


20 


21 


7 


24 


72 


Blanks 


321 


477 


454 


463 


1715 


PARK & RECREATION COMMISSION 












1 year 












John Nichols 


295 


385 


357 


394 


1431 


Blanks 


87 


128 


115 


112 


442 


Scattered 


1 











1 


LIBRARY TRUSTEE - 2 years 












Martin Gottlieb 


272 


369 


374 


386 


1401 


Blanks 


110 


144 


98 


120 


472 


Scattered 


1 











1 


ASSESSOR - 3 years 












Roger E. Hardy 


291 


401 


384 


408 


1484 


Blanks 


92 


112 


88 


98 


390 


SELECTMAN - 3 years 












Paul Hinkley 


192 


191 


132 


195 


710 


Dorothy Sumner 


28 


44 


23 


17 


112 


Sandra G. Munsey 


140 


247 


282 


259 


928 


Lawrence S tiers 


12 


20 


29 


23 


84 


Blanks 


11 


11 


6 


12 


40 


TAX COLLECTOR - 3 years 












Nancy J. Preston 


160 


244 


243 


229 


876 


Charles H. Rayner, Jr. 


213 


260 


220 


272 


965 


Blanks 


10 


9 


9 


5 


33 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE - 3 years 












Darrel Bates 


234 


281 


298 


297 


1110 


Leslie H. Kimmell 


54 


49 


57 


48 


208 


John T. Harney 


203 


259 


212 


235 


909 


Thomas McMurtrie 


177 


274 


253 


274 


978 


Blanks 


98 


163 


124 


158 


543 


LIBRARY TRUSTEE - 3 years 












Deborah Storrs 


261 


367 


351 


375 


1354 


John Wissler 


291 


342 


331 


331 


1295 


Blanks 


214 


317 


262 


306 


1099 


PARK & RECREATION COMMISSION 












3 years 












Barbara Maliff 


254 


338 


329 


342 


1263 


Richard E. Nickerson 


287 


387 


349 


376 


1399 


Blanks 


224 


301 


266 


294 


1085 


Scattered 


1 











1 



141 



185 


392 


371 


381 


1429 


89 


119 


98 


125 


431 


9 


2 


3 





14 


i06 


426 


391 


393 


1516 


76 


87 


81 


113 


357 


1 











1 



HOUSING AUTHORITY - 4 years 
Peter Gaines 
Blanks 
Scattered 

PLANNING BOARD - 5 years 
Robert Kinsman 
Blanks 
Scattered 



Tellers for counting ballots after the polls were closed were: 

Elmer Portmann, Maybelle Maguire, Marion Bosselman, Margaret Bernick, 
Phyllis Wilmarth, Beatrica Bangs, Florence Roberts, Barbara Connors, Joan 
Bussow, Muriel Harris, Mary MairEtienne, Elizabeth Ippoliti, Margaret Marr, 
Clara DeNucci, John Ganley, Anna Murhpy, Phyllis Ripley, Mary Lovell, 
Frederick Rogers, Jr., Richard DeSorgher, Alma Richards, Jean Sander, 
Beverly Smith, Jeanne Mikelonis, Jeanne Harding, Sarah Regan, Lucille 
Cynewski, Barbara Armstrong, Cynthia Caissie, Margaret Erdlen, Shirley 
O'Donnell, Marie Kilmer, Thomas McGinnis, Jane McGinnis, Lorraine Ripley, 
John DeMartino, Weston Kolsti, Bobby Kolsti, Linda Bohn, Gladys Forsythe, 
Olga Harrington, Jessie Portmann, John Downing, Janet 0' Toole and Susan 
Thornton. 

After the results were publicly announced, the ballots, tally sheets and 
master sheet were turned over to the Town Clerk for safe keeping as pre- 
scribed by law. 

A true copy attest: 

Nancy J. VnoAton 
Town Clerk 




REGISTRAR JOHN F. GANLEY MONITORS THE ELECTION BOX 



142 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
FOR, THE TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS, APRIL 25, 1977 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:45 after ascertaining 
that a quorum was present. Those present were invited to join the Salute 
to the Flag. 

NOTE: The action taken on all articles will be recorded in their 
regular sequence regardless of the order on which they were voted: 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the 
several Town Officers for the past year. 

VOTE: Voted to receive the reports of the several Town Officers for 
the past year. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer 
from available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any 
other Town Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray operating 
expenses of the Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1977, or such 
other sums as the Town may determine as required by General Laws, Chapter 
41, Section 108, or do or act anything in relatin thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to raise and appropriate the following named sums of 
money to defray the departmental and other expenses of the Town 
for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1977, as required by 
General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108: 

A100-00 SELECTMEN 
A100-01 Administration 

100 Personnel $2,050 

200 Operations 2,200 

300 Supplies 2,800 

500 Equipment 



A100-03 Executive Secretary 

100 Personnel 129,322 

200 Operations 550 

500 Equipment 1,300 



A100-04 Data Processing 
200 Operations 10,235 
500 Equipment 0_ 



$7,050 



131,172 



10,235 
TOTAL AlOO-01, 03, 04 $148,457 



A101-00 Town Counsel 
100 Personnel 7,000 

200 Operations 2,590 



143 



9,590 



A102-00 Treasurer 




100 Personnel 


5,000 


200 Operations 


3,430 


A103-00 Tax Collector 




100 Personnel 


5,000 


200 Operations 


5,160 


500 Equipment 


229 


A104-00 Town Clerk 




100 Personnel 


5,000 


200 Operations 


932 


A105-00 Assessors 




100 Personnel 


1,750 


200 Operations 


14,375 


400 Other Charges 


150 


500 Equipment 


100 


A106-00 Planning Board 




200 Operations 


7,970 


500 Equipment 






A107-00 Park & Recreation 

A107-01 Administration 
100 Personnel 1,322 

200 Operations 5,805 

500 Equipment 5,000 



107-02 Recreation 




100 Personnel 


20,592 


200 Operations 


7,383 


300 Supplies 


1,885 


400 New Programs 


1,500 



8,430 



10,389 



5,932* 



16,375* 



7,970* 



12,127* 



A107-03 Parks 
100 Personnel 

200 Operations 3,282 



A107-05 Youth Advisory Commission 
200 Operations 50 



TOTAL A107-01, 02, 03, 05 $46,819 

A108-00 Election & Registration 
100 Personnel 4,568 

200 Operations 3,128 



31,360* 



3,282 



50* 



7,696 



144 



A109-00 Town Hall 




100 Personnel 


9,944 


200 Operations 


17,505 


500 Equipment 


1,500 



A110-00 Highway Department 
A110-04 Highway 



100 Personnel 
200 Operations 


164,023 
51,730 


A110-05 Sidewalks 
200 Operations 


4,000 


A110-06 Snow & Ice 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 


21,566 
44,000 


A110-07 Town Garage 
200 Operations 


8,900 


A110-08 Equipment Repair 
and Maintenance 
200 Operations 


30,942 






TOTAL A110-04, 05, 06, 07, 08 $325,161 

Alll-00 Police Department 
Alll-01 Administration 

100 Personnel 69,060 

200 Operations 7,400 



Alll-02 Operations 

100 Personnel 217,000 

200 Operations 7,400 

300 Supplies 1,650 



Alll-03 Cruiser 
200 Operations 13,800 

500 Equipment 9,000 



Alll-04 Communications 
200 Operations 7,950 

500 Equipment 1,900 



Alll-05 Traffic Markings & Signs 
200 Operations 6 



28,949 



215,753 



4,000 



65,566 



8,900 



30,942 



76,460* 



226,050* 



22,800 



9,850 



6,000* 



145 



Alll-06 School Traffic 
100 Personnel 13,578 

200 Operations 300 



TOTAL Alll-01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06 $355,038 

A112-00 Fire Department 
A112-01 Administration 

100 Personnel 17,706 

200 Operations 800 



A112-02 Operations 

100 Personnel 37,773 

200 Operations 13,236 

500 Equipment 8,000 



TOTAL A112-01, 02 $77,515 

A114-00 Tree & Moth 
A114-01 Mosquito Control 
200 Operations 2,100 



A114-02 Tree Care 
100 Personnel 8,560 

200 Operations 2,375 



A114-03 Insect & Pest Control 
100 Personnel 1,070 

200 Operations 1,550 



A114-04 Dutch Elm 
100 Personnel 1,605 

200 Operations 825 



TOTAL A114-01, 02, 03, 04 $18,085 

A115-00 Building Inspector 

100 Personnel 8,560 

200 Operations 1,400 
500 Equipment 300 



A116-00 Plumbing Inspector 
100 Personnel 2,247 

200 Operations 300 



A117-00 Gas Inspector 
100 Personnel 963 

200 Operations 96 



146 



13,878 



18,506 



59,009 



2,100 



10,935 



2,620 



2,430 



10,260 



2,547 



1,059 



A118-00 Wiring Inspector 
100 Personnel 3,203 

200 Operations 500 



3,703 



A119-00 Sealer Wts. & Measures 
100 Personnel 256 

200 Operations 130 



A120-00 Dog Officer 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 


10,681 
1,170 


A121-00 Civil Defense 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 


300 
400 


A122-00 Board of Appeals 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 


750 

740 


A123-00 Street Lights 
200 Operations 


33,880 


A125-00 Board of Health 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 


2,360 
6,855 


A125-01 Outreach 
200 Operations 


12,500 


A126-00 Public Health Nurse 
100 Personnel 


2,575 



386 



11,851 



700 



1,490 



33,880 



9,215 



12,500* 



2,575 



A127-00 Garbage Disposal 
200 Operations 



19,000 



19,000 



A128-00 Mental Health 
200 Operations 



6,400 



6,400 



A129-00 Ambulance 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 



5,672 

1,830 





7,502(? 



147 



A130-00 Landfill 




XQQ. Personnel 


18,291 


200 Operations 


12,137 


500 Roadway to Gravel Pit 






A131-00 Sewer 

A131-01 Sewer Operations 

100 Personnel 39,020 

200 Operations 63,048 

300 Supplies 

500 Repair Streets 



A132-00 Veterans 

A132-01 Veterans Operations 
100 Personnel 1,800 

200 Operations 1,029 

400 Benefits 9,600 



A132-02 Grave Markers 
200 Operations 400 



A133-00 Memorial Day 
200 Operations 500 



A134-00 Council on Aging 
200 Operations 3,200 



A135-00 Library 

100 Personnel 28,858 

200 Operations 16,265 

300 Supplies 1,325 

400 Credits (11,293) 

500 Equipment 



A140-00 Water Department 




100 Personnel 


55,435 


200 Operations 


49,500 


300 Supplies 





400 New Services 


7,290 


500 Equipment & Repairs 


14,200 



A145-00 Cemetery Commission 

100 Personnel 13,322 

200 Operations 2,750 

500 Equipment 500 



A146-00 Conservation Commission 
200 Operations 1, 



148 



30,428 



102,068 



12,429 



400 



500 



3,200 






35,155 



126,425@ 



16,572 



1,440 



A147-00 Historical Commission 
200 Operations 606 



A148-00 Development & Industrial 
Commission 
200 Operations 75 



A150-00 Town Debt 
A150-01 Principal 
400 Other Charges 459,700 

A150-02 Interest 
400 Other Charges 260,000 



TOTAL A150-01, 02 $719,700 

A155-00 Insurance 
A155-01 Vehicles 
200 Operations 23,000 



A155-02 Workmen's Compensation 
200 Operations 38,000 



A155-03 Property & Liability 
200 Operations 21,234 



A155-04 Group 
200 Operations 100,000 



TOTAL A155-01, 02, 03, 04 $182,234 

A160-00 Town Report 
200 Operations 4,900 



A161-00 County Retirement 
200 Other Charges 



A163-00 Reserve Fund 
400 Other Charges 



A170-00 Town Meetings 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 



A171-00 Warrant Committee 
200 Operations 89 



50, 


,000 




420 


1, 


,015 


2, 


,360 



606 



75 



459,700 
260,000 



23,000 



38,000 



21,234 



100,000 



4,900* 



92,051 



50,000 



3,795 



89 



149 



A175-00 Personnel Board 
100 Personnel 450 

200 Operations 395 



A180-00 Regional Vocational 

Technical High School 
200 Operations 267,822 



1000-00 School Administration 
100 Personnel 114,891 

200 Operations 20,933 



2000-00 Instruction 
100 Personnel 3,277,171 

200 Operations 187 , 664 



3000-00 Other School Services 
100 Personnel 45,909 

200 Operations 233,734 



4000-00 Plant Oper. & Maint. 
100 Personnel 248,639 

200 Operations 379,254 



7000-00 Acquisition of Assets 
200 Operations 33,345 



9000-00 Programs with Other 
Systems 
200 Operations 72,180 



8000-03 School Planning & 




Building Committee 




100 Personnel 


70 


200 Operations 


30 


TOTAL ARTICLE 3 


$7,350,983 



845 



267,822* 



TOTAL 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 7000, 9000 $4,500,000* 

8000-01 Vocational Education 
400 Other Intergovernmental 9,075 



8000-02 Adult Education 
100 Personnel 1,600 



9,075 



1,600 



100 



150 






@Move that the sum of $7,502. be appropriated to the A129-00 Ambulance 
Account and that to meet this appropriation the sum of $3,719. be trans- 
ferred from the Anti-Recession Revenue Sharing Account to the A129-00-100 
series and that the balance of $3,783. be raised on the tax levy. 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $7,502. be appropriated to the A129-00 
Ambulance Account and that to meet this appropriation the sum of 
$3,719. be transferred from the Anti-Recession Revenue Sharing Account 
to the A129-00-100 series and that the balance of $3,783. be raised 
on the tax levy. 

@Move that the sum of $126,425. be appropriated to Account A140-00 Water 
Department and that to meet this appropriation $10,000. be transferred 
from the Anti-Recession Revenue Sharing Account to the A140-00-500 account 
and that the balance of $116,425. be raised on the tax levy. 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $126,425. be appropriated to Account 
A140-00 Water Department and that to meet this appropriation $10,000. 
be transferred from the Anti-Recession Revenue Sharing Account to 
the A140-00-500 account and that the balance of $116,425. be raised 
on the tax levy. 



Article 3 items not questioned were passed on April 25, 1977. The starred 
items through Line Item A129-00 were passed on April 25, 1977. Those 
remaining were passed on April 26, 1977. 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:45 P.M. 

Total Article 3 appropriation is reduced by $13,719 leaving $7,337,264 to b< 

raised on the tax levy. 

A true copy attest: 

Nancy J. ?K&>tcm 
Town Clerk 




WARRANT COMMITTEE WAITS IN VAIN FOR QUORUM AT SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

Photo by Toby J. E. Reed 

151 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

APRIL 26, 1977 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 

The meeting was called to order at 7:50 P.M. and the remaining questioned 
Article 3 line items were taken up. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue- of the financial year beginning July 1, 1977, 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to re- 
new any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

VOTE: Voted that the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, be authorized to borrow money from time to time in anticipation 
of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1977, in accor- 
dance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and 
to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all means 
in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to that office. 

VOTE: Voted that the Collector be authorized to use all means in 
the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to that 
office. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation 
of the following elected officers: 

Moderator 

Town Clerk 

Treasurer 

Selectmen 

Assessors 

School Committee 

Trustees of Public Library 

Collector of Taxes 

Park and Recreation Commission 

Planning Board 

Housing Authority 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the salary and compensation of the following elected 
officers be fixed as follows: 

Moderator 

Town Clerk $5,000 

Treasurer $5,000 



152 



Selectmen, Chairman 


$700 


Selectmen, Clerk 


$675 


Selectmen, Third Member 


$675 


Assessor, Chairman 


$600 


Assessor, Clerk 


$575 


Assessor, Third Member 


$575 


School Committee 





Library Trustees 





Tax Collector 


$5,000 


Planning Board 





Park & Recreation Coram. 





Housing Authority 






ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classifications of 
Positions and Pay Schedule of the Personnel Administration Plan so that it 
reads as follows: 



CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 
SALARIED POSITIONS 



Police Department 
Police Chief 
Police Sergeant 
Police Officer 
Dog Officer 



Minimum 

15,170 

13,457 

10,951 

9,466 



2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 



14,017 
11,720 



Streets, Water and Sewer Department 
Superintendent 16,384 



Fire Department 
Chief 



12,620 



13,125 



20,187 
14,722 
13,457 
10,316 



21,845 



16,875 



7,026 


7,438 


7,800 


8,188 


8,750 


3,625 


3,825 


4,044 


4,268 


4,500 


3,625 


3,825 


4,044 


4,268 


4,500 



Executive Department 

Executive Secretary 15,777 24,272 

Administrative Secretary 9,013 9,511 10,039 10,594 11,182 



Library 

Librarian 
Asst. Librarian 
Children's Librarian 

Hourly Positions 



Listed below is a 12-grade, 5-step hourly structure, in which all hourly 
graded positions are slotted. 

Grade 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



2.49 


2.63 


2.77 


2.90 


3.06 


2.72 


2.86 


3.00 


3.14 


3.28 


2.94 


3.06 


3.19 


3.37 


3.57 


3.19 


3.32 


3.43 


3.63 


3.86 


3.25 


3.43 


3.63 


3.81 


4.00 


3.32 


3.57 


3.76 


3.94 


4.26 


3.76 


4.00 


4.26 


4.50 


4.74 



153 



8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



4.18 


4.45 


4.69 


4.93 


5.25 


4.45 


4.69 


4.93 


5.25 


5.55 


4.69 


4.93 


5.18 


5.50 


5.82 


4.80 


5.13 


5.44 


5.75 


6.07 


5.13 


5.44 


5.75 


6.07 


6.43 


HOURLY 


GRADE LISTINGS 







GRADE 1 

Swimming Instructor (PTT) 
Lifeguard Instructor (PTT) 

$687 minimum per season 
Library Aide (PTT) 
Playground Counselor (PTT) 
Lifeguard (PTT) 

$572 minimum per season 
Laborer Intern (PTT) 

May be paid minimum wage 
Laborer (PTT) 

GRADE 2 



Part Time/Temporary - (PTT) 
Regular - (R) 

GRADE 7 



Senior Secretary (R) 
Truck Driver (PTT) 
Special Police Officer (PTT) 
Permanent Intermittent (PTT) 
Call Firefighters (PTT) 
Ambulance E.M.T. (PTT) 

GRADE 8 

Light Equipment Operator (R) 
Municipal Buildings Custodian (R) 

GRADE 9 



Presently no jobs 

GRADE 3 

Clerk Typist (PTT) 
Library Sr. Aide (PTT) 
Cemetery Foreman (PTT) 

GRADE 4 

Skilled Laborer (R) 
Secretary (PTT) 

GRADE 5 

Collector /Bookkeeper/Secretary (R) 

GRADE 6 

Deputy Collector/Bookkeeper (R) 
Police Matron (PTT) 
Skating Supervisor (PTT) 
Traffic Supervisor (PTT) 



Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator (R) 
Heavy Equipment Operator (R) 
Water Technician (R) 

GRADE 10 

Equipment Operator Repairman (R) 
Assistant Wastewater Treatment 
Plant Operator-in-Charge (R) 

GRADE 11 

Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Operator-in-Charge (R) 
Tree Warden/insect Pest Control (PTT) 

GRADE 12 

Street/Water/Sewer Foreman (R) 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Asst. Waterfront Director 
Deputy Collector 
Asst. Dog Officer 
Ambulance Serviceman 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 
Part Time/Temporary 

$522 per year 

$1,488 to $1,942 per year 

$92 to $127 per week, $801 min. per season 

Fee 

$229 per year and $4.26 per hr. when on duty 

$3.04 per run, subject to $29 min. per mo. 



154 



Fire 

Deputy Chief 
Captain 
Lieutenant 
Clerk 

Playground Director 

Police Intern 

Poll Worker 

Recreation Coordinator 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights /Measures 

Town Counsel 

Tree Climber 

Veterans' Agent 

Inspectors 

Building Inspector 
Acting Building Inspector 
Gas Inspector 
Acting Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Acting Plumbing Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Acting Wiring Inspector 
Health Agent 
Street Inspector 
Zoning Enforcing Officer 



$791 per year 
$265 per year 
$201 per year 
$201 per year 

$103 to $157 per week 

$113 to $148 per week 

$2.97 per hour 

$75 to $92 per week 

$152 per year 

$364 per year 

$256 per year 

$3,010 to $7,524 per year 

$3.25 to $5.25 per hour 

$1,701 per year 

$7.52 per inspection 

Annual minimum $1,456 
Annual minimum $194 
Annual minimum $402 
Annual minimum $73 
Annual minimum $1,190 
Annual minimum $273 
Annual minimum $661 
Annual minimum $194 
$7.52 per inspection 
$3.95 per hour 
$7.52 per inspection 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted that the classification of positions and pay 
schedule be so amended with the exception that, under hourly 
grade listings, Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator-in-Charge (R) 
be deleted from Grade 11 and added to Grade 12, and that the 
position of Senior Accounts Clerk be added to Grade 8; the 
Veterans' Agent yearly salary is changed from $1,701 per year 
to $1,800 per year. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration 
Plan Classification of Positions and Pay Schedule's Hourly Grade Listings as 
follows : 

Grade 11 - Remove: Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator-in-Charge (R) 
Grade 12 - Add: Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator-in-Charge (R) 

or take any action relative thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of instal- 
ling brick sidewalks, old fashioned street lighting and/or landscaping im- 
provements on North Street between Main Street and Frairy Street, or take any 



155 



action relating thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

The meeting was adjourned at 9:50 P.M. and reconvened at 10:15 P.M. The 
first five articles of the Special Town Meeting were acted upon at that time. 
The Annual Town Meeting adjourned at 10:45 P.M. and a motion was made to re- 
convene on May 2, 1977 at the Dale St. School Auditorium at 7:30 P.M. The 
motion carried. 

A true copy attest: 

Nancy J. VKOAton 
Town Clerk 



ADJOUNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
Dale Street School 
May 2, 1977 

The meeting was called to order at 7:50 P.M. after ascertaining that a quorum 
was present. A motion to reconsider and rescind the vote on Article 9 was 
made. The vote was 128 to 114 and it failed to carry. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, and/or 

transfer a sum of money for the purpose of resurfacing North Street from the 

Dover Town Line to Winter Street and to authorize the Selectmen to enter into 

any and all contracts necessary or incidental thereto, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $10,000. be raised and appropriated 
for the purpose of resurfacing North Street from the Dover Town 
Line to Farm Street and that the Selectmen be authorized to enter 
into any and all contracts necessary or incidental thereto. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer and/or borrow the sum of $3,500. for the purpose of installing 
270 feet of drainage in Mitchell Street between North Street and Mitchell 
Place and 200 feet of drainage in North Street from Mitchell Street southerly 
for 200 feet, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $3,500. be appropriated for the purpose 
of installing 270 feet of drainage in Mitchell Street between North 
Street and Mitchell Place and 200 feet of drainage in North Street 
from Mitchell Street southerly for a distance of 200 feet and to meet 
said appropriation that the sum of $1,315.12 be transferred from the 
unexpended balance voted under Article 5 of the Special Town Meeting 
of December 11, 1972, and that the sum of $2,184.88 be transferred 
from the unexpended balance voted under Article 14 of the Annual Town 
Meeting of 1975. 



156 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of pur- 
chasing equipment for the Street Department and Park Department as listed and 
authorize the Selectmen to trade as part of the purchase price equipment to 
be replaced: 

To Be Acquired Department Trade 



1. 


Street Sweeper 


Street 


1969 Wayne Sweeper 


2. 


2 Yard Front End Loader 


Street 


1970 Hough 60 


3. 


Field Aerator 


Park 


None 


4. 


Sprayer 


Park 


None 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $1,400. be appropriated for the purchase 
of a field aerator and that to meet this appropriation, the sum of 
$498.50 be transferred from the Highway Machinery Road Account and 
the balance of $901.50 be raised on the tax levy. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds, a sum of money for the purpose 
of installing an eight (8) inch water main in West Street from Harding 
Street southwesterly for a distance of approximately four hundred and fifty 
(450) feet or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $6,820. be appropriated for the purpose 
of installing an eight (8) inch water main in West Street from 
Harding Street southwesterly for a distance of approximately four 
hundred and fifty (450) feet and that said sum be transferred from 
the Revenue Sharing Account to meet this appropriation. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of making 
improvements to the Medfield Town Hall, or take any action relative thereto. 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $15,000 be appropriated for the purpose 
of making improvements to the Medfield Town Hall and that said sum 
be transferred from the Revenue Sharing Account to meet this appro- 
priation. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the funds shall be raised to provide for payment of 
a prior fiscal year bill for Property & Liability Insurance Account No. A155- 
03, 200 Operations, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $2,687. be raised and appropriated for 
payment of a prior fiscal year bill for Property and Liability Insu- 
rance Account No. A155-03, 200 Operations. The vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the funds shall be raised to provide for payment of 
a prior fiscal year bill for Parks & Recreation Account No. A107-00, 200 
Operations, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Park & Recreation Commission) 
157 



VOTE: Voted that the sum of $3,800. be raised and appropriated 
for payment of a prior fiscal year bill for Parks & Recreation 
Account No. A107-00, 200 Operations. The vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose 
of replacing a six (6) inch water main in Bridge Street from approximately 
Essex Road northwesterly for a distance of approximately twenty-five hundred 
(2,500) feet, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to name the bridges over the Stop 
River as follows : 

Noon Hill Street Frairy's Bridge 

Causeway Street Causeway Bridge 

South Street Thurston's Bridge 

and to authorize the Selectmen to petition the County Commissioners to name 
the bridges spanning the Charles River as follows: 

Orchard Street Upper Bridge 

Main Street Turnpike Bridge 

Bridge Street The Great Bridge 

North Meadows Road Death's Bridge 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Historical Commission) 

VOTE: Voted that the bridges over the Stop River be named as follows: 

Noon Hill Street Frairy's Bridge 

Causeway Street Causeway Bridge 

South Street Thurston's Bridge 

and that the Selectmen be authorized and instructed to petition the 
County Commissioners to name the bridges spanning the Charles River 
as follows : 

Orchard Street Upper Bridge 

Main Street Turnpike Bridge 

North Meadows Road Death Bridge 

Bridge Street The Great Bridge 

and that the proper officials of the towns to which these bridges lead 
be advised of this action. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose of purchasing 
and installing a tone alert system for use of the police, fire and ambulance 
departments or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Police Department) 



158 



VOTE: Voted that the sum of $4,860. be appropriated for the purpose 
of purchasing and installing a tone alert system for the use of the 
police, fire and ambulance departments and that said sum be trans- 
ferred from the Revenue Sharing Account to meet this appropriation. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds, a sum of money for the purpose of purchasing 
and installing a radio console in the police station on North Street, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Police Department) 
VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote the following: 

WHEREAS, at the Special Town Meeting of May 15, 1972, the Town voted, 

"That the Selectmen notify the County Commissioners that the people 
of the Town of Medfield demand a moratorium on further land takings 
and lay outs until a complete review of the road system in Medfield 
is completed excluding new Route 27 now in progress.", and, 

WHEREAS, the review of the road system in Medfield has been completed, 

It is the consensus of this meeting that the moratorium on further land 
takings and lay outs be ended, 

or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen and Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the Selectmen notify the County Commissioners 
that the people of the Town of Medfield withdraw their demand for 
a moratorium on further lay outs as voted at the Special Town 
Meeting of May 15, 1972. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote the following resolution: 

It is the consensus of this meeting that where lands are taken 
from the Conservation Commission of the Town by the Federal 
Government for the Charles River Watershed project, sums equal 
to those received by the Town for such takings should be appro- 
priated to the Conservation Commission to acquire other conser- 
vation lands and the Conservation Commission should record the 
receipt by the Town of all such sums for reference to future 
town meetings. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Conservation Commission) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose 
of constructing sewer interceptors and associated street sewers pursuant 
to design plans prepared under the authorization of Article 26 of the 1975 
Annual Town Meeting and to see if the Town will authorize the Water and 
Sewer Department and/or the Board of Selectmen to enter into any contracts 
necessary for the purpose of this article and to apply for and receive 

159 



Federal, State or other funds for said purpose, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted that $2,500,000. is appropriated for constructing the 
sewers, in accordance with design plans prepared pursuant to the 
authorization granted under Article 26 of the 1975 Annual Town 
Meeting; that to raise this appropriation the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow $2,500,000. 
under G. L. c. 44, s. 7(1) as amended; that the Selectmen are 
authorized to acquire by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise 
any land or interests therein needed for the project; and that 
the Selectmen, or the Water and Sewer Department with the approval 
of the Selectmen, are authorized to apply for and accept any 
available Federal or State grants; and that assessments be levied 
for this construction in accordance with Regulations previously 
adopted by the Town. 

YES 209 
NO 62 

RESOLUTION: Resolve that no funds be expended or liabilities 
incurred under the authorization of Article 23 of the 1977 
Annual Town Meeting unless and until State and Federal grants 
are approved and contracts are entered into with exception of 
funds necessary to make the application. The resolution was 
unanimous . 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of micro- 
filming Town records, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $1,000. be appropriated for the purpose 
of microfilming Town records and that said sum be transferred from 
the Ant i- Recess ion Revenue Sharing Account to meet this appropriation. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the 
following named streets, or parts thereto: 

Eastmount Road from station 6+63.96 to 11+29.60 
Essex Road from station 0+0 to station 4+45 
Hemlock Lane from station 0+00 to station 1+97.50 
Indian Hill Road from station 38+00 to station 53+00 
Mohawk Street from station 0+0 to station 6+02.17 
Penobscot Street from station 0+0 to station 11+92.43 
Pilgrim Lane from station 0+30.35 to station 13+58 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in 
the Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's Office and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such right j 
titles and easements, including drainage easements, as may be necessary to 
accomplish such purpose, or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



160 



VOTE: Voted that the Town accept as public ways the following named 
streets or parts thereof: 

Eastmount Road from station 6+63.96 to station 11+29.60 
Essex Road from station 0+0 to station 4+45 
Hemlock Lane from station 0+00 to station 1+97.50 
Indian Hill Road from station 38+00 to station 53+00 
Pilgrim Lane from station 0+30.35 to station 13+58 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred 
to in the Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's Office and 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or 
otherwise such rights, titles and easements, including drainage 
easements, as may be necessary to accomplish such purpose. 
The vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of providing 
recreation for the physically and mentally handicapped, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $1,500. be raised and appropriated for 
the purpose of providing recreation for the physically and mentally 
handicapped. 



: 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
the Conservation Fund and determine in what manner the money will be raised, 
or take any action relative thereto. 



(Board of Selectmen & Conservation Coram.) 
VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen 
to appoint a local Growth Policy Committee, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law by 
adding to Section 6.2, "Table of Area Regulations", the following: 

6.2.16 Setback in the Table of Area Regulations shall not apply to 
fences. 

or take any action relative thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the Zoning By-law be amended by adding to Section 
6.2, "Table of Area Regulations", the following: 

6.2.16 Setback in the Table of Area Regulations shall not 
apply to fences. 
The vote was unanimous. 



161 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 13.9, "Board 
of Appeals", of the Zoning By-law by deleting the words, "one associate 
member" and adding the words, "two associate members", or take any action 
relative thereto. 

(Board of Appeals on Zoning) 

VOTE: Voted that the Zoning By-law be amended by deleting from 
Section 13,9 the words, "one associate member" and adding the 
words, "two associate members". 
The vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
the Council on Aging, A134-00, 200 operations account for the purpose of 
defraying costs of personal visits to ascertain needs of elderly within the 
Town of Medfield, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



(Council on Aging) 
VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the sum shall be raised for the purpose of pro- 
viding recreational facilities on Town-owned land off Hospital Road and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or Park and Recreation Commission to 
enter into State and/or Federal contracts and to accept State and/or Federal 
grants for said purpose, or take any action relative thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 



The meeting adjourned at 10:45 P.M. It was voted to reconvene at the Dale 
Street School at 7:30 P.M. on May 3, 1977. 



A true copy attest: 

Nancy J. VntAtovi 
Town Clerk 



162 






ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
May 3, 1977 



The meeting was called to order at 8:00 P.M. after ascertaining that a quo- 
rum was present. A motion to reconsider the vote on Article 32 was made; 
the motion to reconsider failed to carry, resulting in a vote of 108 YES to 
142 NO. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the funds shall be raised to observe a homecoming 
celebration and to authorize the Selectmen to appoint a committee to plan the 
observance, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-laws by adding to 
Article IV, Section 29, Regulations for Yard Sales, Flea Markets, and Estate 
Sales as follows: 

SECTION A - PURPOSE: It is the intent of these rules and regulations to pro- 
vide a mechanism for allowing, subject to reasonable and appropriate controls, 
certain types of activites having to do with the sale of second-hand articles 
within the community while at the same time preserving the residential atmos- 
phere of the various neighborhoods in Town. 

It is further the intent of these rules and regulations to enhance traffic 
and pedestrian safety through the provision of appropriate restrictions on 
the placing of signs and advertising devices on utility poles, traffic signs, 
street signs and public trees. 

It is also the intent of these rules and regulations to assure that activi- 
ties relating to the sale of second-hand articles by persons or groups cus- 
tomarily engaged in such activities as a business shall be limited to those 
locations within Town which, through its Zoning-By-laws, has set aside for 
the conduct of businesses. 

SECTION B - DEFINITIONS: For the purposes of these rules and regulations the 
following words and terms shall have and include the following respective 
meanings. 

Flea Market - A temporary market where old or used articles are sold. 

Yard Sale - The sale for not more than two consecutive days of old or 
used articles upon residential property where the material 
to be sold originiates from said property. 

Estate Sale - The sale of the contents of a dwelling by an agent or 
agents acting on behalf of the owner. 

Rummage Sale - (See Flea Market) 

Garage Sale - (See Yard Sale) 

Porch Sale - (See Yard Sale) 

163 



SECTION C - REQUIREMENTS; 
Flea Markets 



1. Business and Industrial Zoning Districts 

a. Flea Markets may be held in a Business or Industrial District 
pursuant to a permit granted by the Board of Selectmen. No 
material for sale shall be displayed on any public or private 
way. Permits may be issued subject to conditions deemed by 
the Board of Selectmen to be necessary or advisable. 

b. No sign or advertising device shall be placed within any street 
right-of-way, including free standing signs, or any sign affixed 
to street signs, traffic and regulatory or warning signs or any 
utility poles within such right-of-way. No such sign or adver- 
tising device shall be placed on any public tree. 

c. Any authorized signs may be displayed on the premises for not 
more than five (5) days. 

2. All Other Zoning Districts 

a. Flea Markets may be held in any other Zoning District pursuant 
to a permit granted by the Board of Selectmen subject to con- 
ditions hereinafter set forth. 

(1) Flea Market is under the sponsorship of a Medfield based 
non-profit organization or corporation whose purpose is 
to provide service or charitable work. 

(2) The number of Flea Markets shall be limited to one per 
calendar year per organization or corporation. 

(3) No person customarily engaged in the business of conducting 
Flea Markets shall participate in any Flea Market within 
any Zoning District except Business and Industrial Districts 
unless the sponsoring organization or corporation has re- 
ceived a special permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals. 

No material for sale shall be displayed on any public or 
private way. Permits may be issued subject to conditions 
deemed by the Board of Selectmen to be necessary or ad- 
visable. 

(4) No sign or advertising device shall be placed within any 
street right-of-way, including free standing signs, traffic 
regulatory or warning signs or any utility poles within 
such right-of-way. No such sign or advertising device 
shall be placed on any public tree. 

(5) Any authorized signs may be displayed on the premises for 
not more than five (5) days. 

(6) Such sale shall not exceed two (2) days' duration. 



164 



Yard Sa,!^ 

1. Business and Industrial Zoning Districts 

a. Yard sales may be held in a Business or Industrial Zoning District 
pursuant to a permit issued by the Board of Selectmen. No material 
for sale shall be displayed on any public way. Permits may be 
issued subject to conditions deemed by the Board of Selectmen to 

be necessary or advisable. 

b. No sign or advertising device shall be placed within any street 
right-of-way, including free standing signs, or any sign affixed 
to street signs, regulatory or warning signs, or any utility poles 
within such right-of-way. No such sign or advertising device shall 
be placed on any public tree. 

c. Any authorized signs may be displayed on the premises for not more 
than five (5) days. 

2. All Other Zoning Districts 

a. Yard sales may be held in any other Zoning District pursuant to a 
permit granted by the Board of Selectmen subject to the following 
conditions. 

(1) All material available for sale shall originate from the 
premises on which the sale takes place. 

(2) No sign or advertising device shall be placed within any 
street right-of-way, including free standing signs, or 
any sign affixed to street signs, traffic and regulatory 
or warning signs or any utility poles within such right- 
of-way. No such sign or advertising device shall be 
placed on any public tree. 

(3) Any authorized signs may be displayed on the premises for 
not more than five (5) days. 

(4) Such sale shall not exceed three (3) days' duration. 
SECTION D - PROCEDURE 

1. Any person, organization or corporation intending to conduct a Flea 
Market, Rummage Sale, Garage Sale, Yard Sale, Porch Sale, Estate Sale, 
or any similar activity by a different name shall make application for 
a permit to conduct such activity at the Board of Selectmen's office no 
less than ten (10) calendar days prior to the date of the proposed 
activity. 

2. If an application is favorably acted upon by the Board of Selectmen or 
its designated representative, a permit shall be issued to the person, 
organization or corporation to conduct such activity and said permit 
shall be available at all times on the site during the term of the sale, 

SECTION E - FEES 

1. The fee for permits granted pursuant to these Rules and Regulations 
shall be according to the following schedule: 



165 



Flea Market $10.00 

Rummage Sale 10.00 

Estate Sale 10.00 

Garage, Yard, Porch Sales, etc. 5.00 

The schedule above lists the most commonly used terms in describing 
various sales dealing with second-hand articles. If different names 
are used to describe the sale of second-hand articles, the Selectmen 
in their sole discretion shall determine which of the above terms 
most clearly describes the proposed activity and shall set the fee 
accordingly. 

SECTION F - ENFORCEMENT 

1. The Police Department shall be responsible for enforcement of these 
rules and regulations and upon request of a police officer, any person 
conducting any activity governed by these rules and regulations, shall 
make available for inspection by the police officer the permit granted 
by the Board of Selectmen. 

2. A person found by a police officer not to be in compliance with the rules 
and regulations as heretofore set forth shall, upon such police officer's 
order, cease such activity immediately or comply with the directive of 
the police officer to bring into conformity that portion of the activity 
which is deemed to be in violation of these rules and regulations. 

3. Signs or advertising devices in violation of these rules and regulations 
found to be affixed to any utility pole, street sign, traffic warning 

or regulatory signs within the right-of-way of any street shall be 
removed by any police officer observing same. 

4. Whoever violates any provisions of these rules and regulations shall 
forfeit and pay for each offense a fine not exceeding $25.00. 

SECTION G - GENERAL 

1. Nothing contained in these rules and regulations shall require the 
Board of Selectmen to issue a permit if, in its opinion, the public 
interest would be adversely affected by so doing. 

2. The Board of Selectmen may waive strict compliance with any of the 
above rules and regulations if after its examination of the facts in 
a particular case such waiver can be granted without derogating from 
the intent and purpose of these rules and regulations. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE ^35. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Health to estab- 
lish a Youth Counselling and Outreach Program subject to the approval of the 
Personnel Board and for this purpose appropriate a sum of money, and to 
determine in what manner the money will be raised or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Health) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 



166 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the use of 
the Board of Assessors for the purpose of revaluing all real and personal 
property within the Town of Medfield, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose 
of conducting a field review and updating the assessing records of all pro- 
perty in the Town of Medfield as a first phase of a computer assessed tax 
equalization program, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $24,000. dollars be appropriated for the 
purpose of conducting a field review and updating the assessing records 
of all property in the Town of Medfield as a first phase of a computer 
assessed tax equalization program and that the said sum be transferred 
from the Revenue Sharing Account to meet this appropriation. 

YES 126 
NO 107 
A quorum count showed 272 persons in attendance. 

ARTICLE^ 38. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors 
to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
Tax Rate, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Board of Assessors to use the sum of 
$150,000. from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
Tax Rate. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to accept an amendment to the Tri- 
County Regional Vocational Technical School District Agreement initiated and 
proposed by vote of the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School Dis- 
trict Committee adopted on October 13, 1976 and entitled "Amendment No. 4 to 
the Agreement Establishing the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School District," which proposed Amendment provides in substance for an addi- 
tional category of apportioned costs called "outside special education costs" 
to include the net cost of all special education programs for school-age 
children which the District is required to provide under Chapter 766 of the 
Acts of 1972 as amended and which are not conducted by it within its regular 
educational facilities; that such "outside special education costs" shall not 
be included in the District's annual budget but shall be paid directly by the 
town which would have been responsible for the payment of such costs but for 
the fact that the school-age child was enrolled in the District's schools; 
and that any reimbursements or other receipts by the District on account of 
outside special operating costs shall be forwarded promptly by the District to 
the treasurer of the town concerned. 

(Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School District) 



VOTE: Voted that Amendment No. 4 to the Agreement Establishing the Tri- 
County Regional Vocational Technical School District as initiated and 
proposed by vote of the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School District Committee adopted on October 13, 1976 be accepted. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to in- 
struct Boston Edison Company to install a street light on pole 14/22 at Nebo 
Street and Hillcrest Road, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the Selectmen be authorized to instruct Boston Edison 
Company to install a street light on pole 41/22 at Nebo Street and 
Hillcrest Road. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen 
to install a street light on the following named pole, Pole No. 177 at Carol 
Ann Drive and Flintlocke Lane or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted that the Selectmen be authorized to instruct the Boston 
Edison Company to install a street light on pole No. 177 at Carol 
Ann Drive and Flintlocke Lane. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen 
to order street lights on the following named poles: 

Cedar Lane -Pole #1, #3, #5, #7 
Scott Road -Pole #1 
Maplewood Road -Pole #1, #3, #5 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted that the Selectmen be authorized to instruct the Boston 
Edison Company to install street lights on the above named poles. 



ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to abandon a portion of unused sewer 
easment dated August 24, 1886, and recorded with Norfolk Registry of Deeds, 
Book 581, Page 575, running over land now or formerly of Rebel L. Palumbo as 
described by deed of Helen F. Gilmore to Rebel L. Palumbo, recorded with 
Norfolk Registry of Deeds, Book 3160, Page 439, and by deed of Clark-Shaugh- 
nessy, Inc. to Rebel L. Palumbo, recorded with Norfolk Registry of Deeds, 
Book 5101, Page 318 and being shown on a Plan entitled "Plan of Land in 
Medfield, Mass., Scale: 1"=40' , April 1953, by H. A. Kingsbury, Engineer," 
filed with Norfolk Registry of Deeds as No. 425 of 1953, Book 3160, Page 439, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Town abandon the portion of an unused 
sewer easement as requested by the petitioners. The minimum amount to 
be paid for such abandonment is $1.00. 



168 



ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of making 
drainage improvements in Bridge Street, or take any other action relating 
thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $6,350. dollars be appropriated for 
the purpose of making drainage improvements in Bridge Street and 
that said sum be transferred from the Revenue Sharing Account to 
meet this appropriation. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named 
sums as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake 
Cemetery, the interest thereof or as may be neces*sary for said care, 
viz: 

Camille & Irene Roy Lot $200.00 

Helen Hoisington Lot 100.00 

Francis & Josephine Roche Lot 200.00 
Arthur & Shirley Owens Lot 600.00 

Ralph & Barbara Chisholm Lot 200.00 

John & Lillian Senger Lot 100.00 

Charles & Rita Higgins Lot 400.00 

John & Priscilla Mahoney Lot 200.00 

Robert & Kathleen Mitchell Lot 100.00 
Rennie & Katherine Spring Lot 200.00 
Douglas & Barbara Stevenson Lot 100.00 
George & Phyllis Gagliani Lot 400.00 
Lindsay & Alice Ripley Lot 200.00 

Osborne & Anita Daniels Lot 100.00 

VOTE: Voted that the sums set out in the warrant be accepted as 
Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake 
Cemetery. 



The motion was made and seconded that the meeting be dissolved at 9:19 P.M. 

A true copy attest: 

Nancy J. PKZAton 
Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 26, 1977 



Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in the County of Norfolk 
greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said Town, qualified to vote in elections 
and in Town affairs, to meet at the Amos Clark Kingsbury School in said Med- 
field on Tuesday the 26th day of April next, at 7:30 o'clock P.M., then and 
there to act on the following articles: 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:50 P.M. after ascer- 
taining that a quorum was present. It was then adjourned until after the 
remaining Article 3 questioned budgets of the Annual Town Meeting warrant 
were acted upon. The meeting was reconvened at 9:50 P.M. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to acquire by easement, gift, purchase or eminent domain for landfill expan- 
sion lots 31 and 32 on map 48 of the Medfield Assessors' Maps, to appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purpose of this article and to determine in 
what manner the money shall be raised, or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Board of Selectmen be authorized 
to acquire by purchase or eminent domain or otherwise lots 31 and 
32 on map 48 of the Medfield Assessors' Maps for landfill expansion 
purposes and that the sum of $10,700. dollars be transferred from 
the Revenue Sharing Account for this purpose. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of pro- 
viding engineering services and development costs for the expansion of the 
sanitary landfill, or take any action relating thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $60,000. dollars he appropriated for 
the purpose of providing engineering services and development costs 
for the expansion of the sanitary landfill and that said sum be 
transferred from the Revenue Sharing Account to meet this appro- 
priation. 

ARTICLE 3* To see if tne Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of instal- 
ling a 12" water line on West Mill Street and to make such other improvements 
to the water system in the West Mill Street, West Street area as may be re- 
quired by this installation, or take any action relating thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



170 



VOTE: Voted that the stun of $15,000. dollars be appropriated for the 
purpose of installing a 12 inch water line on West Mill Street and 
to make such other improvements to the water system in the West Mill 
Street, West Street area as may be required by this installation and 
that said sum be transferred from the Revenue Sharing Account to 
meet this appropriation. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law by 
adding to Section 2, "Definitions" the following: 

2.1.32 (a) Municipal Use - The use of any building, facility, or 
area owned or leased and operated by the Town of Medfield for the 
general use and welfare of the Town, its inhabitants or businesses 
located within the Town. 

and by deleting from Section 5, "Use Regualtions" clauses 5.4.2.6; 5.4.2.7; 
5.4.2.11; 5.4.2.12; and 5.4.2.13, 

and by adding clause 5.4.2.17, "Municipal Use", requiring a Special Permit 
in all Zoning Districts; 

or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Zoning By-law by adding to Section 2, 
"Definitions" the following: 

2.1.32 (a) Municipal Use \- The use of any building, facility, 
or area owned or leased and operated by the Town of Medfield 
for the general use and welfare of the Town, its inhabitants 
or businesses located within the Town. 

I 

and by deleting from Section 5, "Use Regulations" clauses 5.4.2.6; 
5.4.2.7; 5.4.2.11; 5.4.2.12; and 5.4.2.13, 

and by adding clause 5.4.2.17, "Municipal Use", requiring a 
Special Permit in all Zoning Districts. The vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to abandon a portion of Grove 
Street from North Meadows Road and extending in a northwesterly direction 
for a distance of approximately 870 feet to the property line of the 
Beckwith Post No. 110 American Legion, Inc., or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted that the Town abandon and discontinue a portion of 
Grove Street, an accepted public way, from North Meadows Road 
extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of appro- 
ximately 870 feet to the property line of the Beckwith Post No. 
110 American Legion, Inc. 

The meeting was then adjourned at 10:15 P.M. It was voted to reconvene 
at the conclusion of the Annual Town Meeting. 



171 



ADJOURNED SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
May 3, 1977 



The meeting was called to order at 9:20 P.M. following the conclusion of the 
Annual Town Meeting. 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the appropriation will be met for the purpose of 
purchasing equipment for the Street Department as listed and authorize the 
Selectmen to trade as part of the purchase price equipment to be replaced: 

To be acquired Trade 

1. Street Sweeper 1969 Wayne Sweeper 

2. 2-yard Front End Loader 1970 Hough 60 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $55,600. dollars be appropriated for 
the purpose of purchasing a street sweeper and two-yard front end 
loader for the Street Department and that the Selectmen be authorized 
to trade as part of the purchase price a 1969 Wayne Sweeper and a 
1970 Hough 60 and that said appropriation be met by a transfer from 
the Revenue Sharing Account. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to purchase or otherwise acquire, and will authorize the Select- 
men to take by eminent domain, upon written request of the Conservation 
Commission, for conservation purposes, including outdoor recreation as pro- 
vided by Section 8C of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, as amended, any fee, 
easement or conservation restriction as defined in Section 31 of Chapter 184 
of the General Laws, or other interest in land shown as lot 2 map 20 of the 
Medfield Assessors' Maps, now or formerly of Charles H. Weeber, Jr.; vote to 
appropriate a sum of money for the purposes of this article and determine 
whether the money shall be provided by borrowing or otherwise; vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen or Conservation Commission to apply for and 
receive any Federal and State reimbursement funds that may be available; or 
take any action relative thereto. 

(Conservation Commission) 

VOTE: Voted that the Conservation Commission be authorized to 
purchase or otherwise acquire for conservation purposes, including 
outdoor recreation, as provided by Section 8C of Chapter 40 of 
the General Laws, any fee, easement or conservation restriction 
as defined in Section 31 of Chapter 184 of the General Laws, or 
other similar interest in land shown as Lot 2, map 20 of the 
Medfield Assessors' Maps, now or formerly of Charles H. Weeber, 
Jr.; that the Selectmen be authorized to take by eminent domain 
such interest in said lot as the Conservation Commission may 
request them in writing to take for the purposes of this article; 
that the sum of $5,000. be transferred from the Conservation Fund 
and the sum of $14,000. be transferred from the Revenue Sharing 
Account for the purpose of acquiring said lot; and that the 
Board of Selectmen and the Conservation Commission be authorized 

172 






to apply for and receive any Federal and State Grants, or reimburse- 
ments and to enter into contracts with the State and/or Federal 
Governments for this purpose. 

YES 196 
NO 5 
A quorum count was taken and 277 voters were counted. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from 
available funds for the purpose of resurfacing the parking lot at the Fire 
Station, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $2,000. dollars be appropriated for the 
purpose of resurfacing the parking lot at the Fire Station and that 
said amount be transferred from the Revenue Sharing Account to meet 
this appropriation. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following resolution: 

WHEREAS: Compulsory and binding arbitration for police and fire 
negotiations has been shown to undercut severely the powers of 
home rule by requiring an outside arbitrator to choose the final 
settlement; 

AND WHEREAS: The effect of the trial period of this law has been to 
undermine effective collective bargaining; 

AND WHEREAS: This law has contributed significantly to higher local 
budgets and increased property taxes by raising the level of all local 
wage settlements; 

NOW THEREFORE: Be it resolved that the Medfield Town Meeting hereby 
votes to convey to the Governor and our elected state representatives 
and senators our desire that there be no extension of compulsory and 
binding arbitration beyond its termination date of June 30, 1977, so 
that final authority for determining local expenditures be returned 
to town meeting. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to adopt the Resolution as printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer with 
the approval of the Selectmen to borrow a sum of money allotted or to be 
allotted by the State for the purpose of constructing North Street between 
Main Street and Frairy Street, and that the Selectmen be authorized to enter 
into any and all necessary contracts for that purpose, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 
VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 



173 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine the method by which the appropriation will be met for the purposes 
of preparing a 201 facility plan update, as required by the Massachusetts 
Division of Water Pollution Control and the Environmental Protection Agency 
by mandate in the implementation schedule of the National Pollutant Discharge 
Elimination System Permit, to study increased treatment and plant enlarge- 
ment for a.) Medfield alone, and b.) Medfield, Millis and Cott flows com- 
bined, and to authorize the Water and Sewerage Board to enter into agree- 
ments with the State and Federal Governments for the purpose of accepting 
Federal and State grants or reimbursements therefor, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds 
and/or borrow a sum of money for the purpose of making a water reconnais- 
sance survey by means of test wells and making a prolonged pumping test by 
means of an 8" test well in the Mine Brook area in order to find and get 
State approval of a potable water supply, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds 
and/or borrow a sum of money for the purpose of engineering and preliminary 
work required for preparation of bids for construction of a 1.5 million 
gallon standpipe on Mt. Nebo and a 12" water main from the standpipe in a 
northerly direction to Main Street or take any action relating thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $35,000. dollars be appropriated for 
the purpose of engineering and preliminary work required for the 
preparation of bids for construction of a 1.5 million gallon stand- 
pipe on Mt. Nebo and a 12" water main from the standpipe in a 
northerly direction to Main Street and that said sum be trans- 
ferred from the Revenue Sharing Account to meet this appropriation. 

A quorum count showed 262 voters in attendance. 

The following resolution was passed by the meeting: x 

RESOLVED that the Town of Medfield commends Congresswoman Heckler for 
the position stated in her recent newsletter wherein she expressed 
her belief that the problems of inflation, unemployment and energy 
should have been addressed by Congress before that body voted itself 
a pay raise. 

Further, be it resolved that the Town encourages Mrs. Heckler and 
legislators of a like mind to donate their increased pay to a non- 
profit institution which would research these problems. 

A motion was made to adjourn the meeting to Monday, May 9, 1977 at 7:30 P.M. 
at the Dale Street School. 



174 



ADJOURNED SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
May 9, 1977 



The meeting was called to order at 8:20 after ascertaining that a quorum was 
present. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a 
sum of money for the purpose of construction of a 12" water main in West 
Street from the westerly end of the existing main for approximately 500' to 
the easterly end of a 12" water main at Station #24 in West Street laid by 
others, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $10,000. dollars be appropriated for the 
purpose of construction of a 12" water main in West Street from the 
westerly end of the existing main for approximately 500 feet to the 
easterly end of a 12" water main at Station 24 in West Street laid 
by others, that betterments be assessed for this installation and 
that said sum be transferred from the Revenue Sharing Account to 
meet this appropriation. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification of 
Positions & Pay Schedules to include the following positions under Full Time: 

SALARIED POSITIONS 

Police Department Minimum Maximum 

Chief $15,170 $24,223 

Board of Health 

Youth Counsellor $10,500 

and to add under Hourly Grade Listings: 

Grade 8: Senior Accounts Clerk 

and further to see if the Town will amend the Personnel Administration Plan 
by adding a new sentence to Section 6, "Types of Employment", to read as 
follows: 

"Employees except those on shift assignments will be compensated for 
the number of hours actually worked." 

or take any action relative thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to allow the Water and Sewerage 
Board to proceed with preliminary negotiations and preparations of a draft 
agreement with the Town of Millis for sewage disposal in Medfield, that will 
be beneficial to the Town of Medfield, for presentation at a public infor- 
mation meeting all prior to being voted on by the people at either a Special 
Town Meeting, or a future Annual Town Meeting, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

175 



(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Be it resolved that the Water and Sewerage Board proceed 
with preliminary negotiations and preparation of a draft agreement 
with the Town of Millis for sewage disposal in Medfield that will 
be beneficial to the Town of Medfield for presentation at a public 
information meeting prior to being voted on by the voters at a 
future town meeting. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, and/or 
borrow and/or transfer a sum of money for the purpose of installing storm 
drainage in Forest Street approximately 500 feet southwesterly of High 
Street and to further authorize the Selectmen, in the name of the Town, to 
take by eminent domain such drainage easements as may be necessary for the 
aforesaid, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $12,550. dollars be appropriated 
for the purpose of installing storm drainage in Forest Street 
approximately 500 feet southwesterly of High Street and to 
meet this appropriation $12,550 be transferred from the 
Revenue Sharing Account. 

YES 125 
NO 123 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Zoning By-laws and 
Zoning Map by changing from Residence A to a Business District the following 
described property: 

A certain parcel of land situated on the northerly side of Main Street 
(Route 109) and the westerly side of North Meadow Road (Route 27) in Med- 
field, Norfolk County, Massachusetts and containing 98,852 square feet 
(2.27 acres), more or less; 

Beginning at a point being a concrete bound on the northerly sideline 
of the said Main Street and a distance of 370.88 feet westerly from a 
Massachusetts Highway Bound at the point of courvature (sic) to the said 
North Meadow Road; thence S 70° 24' 00" W along the northerly sideline of 
said Main Street to a concrete bound a distance of 99.92 feet; thence by 
land of Alfred J. and Joan M. Ouelette by three lines respectively; N 24° 
00' 17"W a distance of 174.50 feet, N 20° 29' 10" W a distance of 250.00 
feet, N 42° 29' 10" W a distance of 174.82 feet, to a concrete bound; thence 
by land of Robert R. Palson Estate by three lines respectively; N 49° 04' 
45" E a distance of 128.23 feet to a concrete bound, N 62° 49' 43" E a dis- 
tance of 110.74 feet to an iron road (sic), N 28° 39' 25" E a distance of 
28.55 feet to a concrete bound on the westerly sideline of said North 
Meadow Road; thence S 48° 06' 35" E along the westerly sideline of the said 
North Meadow Road a distance of 220.00 feet to a concrete bound; thence by 
land of John, Jr. and George H. Basile by two lines respectively, N 48° 06' 
55" W a distance of 0.17 feet, S 31° 12' 38" W a distance of 188.23 feet to 
a concrete bound; thence by land of George E. and Phyllis R. Noona (sic) 
Jr. by three lines respectively, S 33° 44' 51" W a distance of 97.22 feet to 
a concrete bound, S 24° 39' 11" E a distance of 268.61 feet to a concrete 
bound by a curve to the left of which the radius is 30.00 feet a distance of 
44.48 feet to the point of beginning. 

(Petition) 



176 



A motion was made to amend the Article in the warrant as follows: 

Moved that the Town vote to amend its Zoning By-law and Map by changing from 
"RS" Residential-Suburban to "B" Business District a parcel of land situated 
on the westerly side of North Meadow Road (Rte. 27) containing 77,805 square 
feet (1.79 acres) more or less, being more particularly described as fol- 
lows: 

Beginning at a point in the easterly property line of land of Alfred J. 
and Joan M. Ouellette; thence by land of Alfred J. & Joan M. Ouellette 
N 20° 29' 10" W a distance of 129.80 feet, N 42° 29' 10" W a distance 
of 174.82 feet to a concrete bound; thence by land of Robert R. Palson 
Estate by three lines respectively; N 49° 04 ? 45" E a distance of 128.23 
feet to a concrete bound, N 62° 49' 43" E a distance of 110.74 feet to 
an iron rod, N 28° 39' 25" E a distance of 28.55 feet to a concrete 
bound on the westerly sideline of the said North Meadow Road a distance 
of 220.00 feet to a concrete bound; thence by land of John, Jr. and 
George H. Basile by two lines respectively, N 48° 06' 55" W a distance 
of 0.17 feet, S 31° 12' 38" W a distance of 188.23 feet to a concrete 
bound; thence by land of George E. and Phyllis R. Noonan, Jr. by three 
lines respectively, S 33° 44' 51" W a distance of 91.22 feet to a con- 
crete bound thence by land of John, Jr., and George H. Basile S 69° 30' 
50" W 61.62 feet to the point of beginning. 

After struggling with emergency generators and flashlights as a result of a 
town-wide power failure due to a snowstorm, the meeting had to be adjourned 
at 9:25 P.M. 

It was voted to reconvene on Tuesday, May 10, 1977 at the High School Audi- 
torium at 7:30 P.M. 

No action was taken on Article 18. 

A true copy attest: 

Nancy J. VnzAton 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

Medfield High School Auditorium 

May 10, 1977 



Due to the town-wide power outage and snow covered country side the motion 
to adjourn the meeting called for on May 10, 1977 was made. The meeting was 
adjourned to May 16, 1977 at 8:00 P.M. at the Dale Street Auditorium. 



177 



ADJOURNED SPECIAL TOWN MEETINC 
May 16, 1977 



The meeting was called to order at 8:30 P.M. and discussion on the motion 
i.e. Article 18, was called for. 

An amendment changing the word "three" on the fourth line from the bottom 
to "two" was made and passed. 

After much discussion and debate a vote was taken on Article 18. 

YES 62 
NO 200 

The meeting was dissolved at 10:12 P.M. 



A true copy attest 

Nancy J. VtioAton 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Norfolk, ss, 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in the County of 
Norfolk, greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby direc- 
ted to notify and warn the inhabitants of said Town, qualified to vote in 
elections and in Town affairs, to meet at the Dale Street School in said 
Medfield on Monday, the 26th day of September next, at 7:30 P.M., then and 
there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
the purpose of an aerial spray to control gypsy moth, and determine in what 
manner the appropriation shall be met, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Insect Pest Control Superintendent) 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification of 
Positions and Pay Schedule of the Personnel Administration Plan to read 
as follows: 

SALARIED POSITIONS Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 

Library 

Children's Librarian $4,531. $4,781. $5,055. $5,335. $5,625. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

178 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
with the approval of the Treasurer to borrow a sum of money for the purpose 
of completing the North Street reconstruction contract; and to apply for and 
receive reimbursement under the provisions of Chapter 356 of the Acts of 
1977, and to authorize the Selectmen to enter into any and all contracts 
necessary or incidental thereto, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the funds shall be raised to provide for payment 
of a prior fiscal year bill for the School Department Account No. 4000-00, 
200 Operations, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Department) 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
extraordinary repairs to the roofs of the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 
and the Memorial Elementary School, and determine in what manner such sum 
shall be raised, and to authorize the Town officials to apply for and re- 
ceive and Federal or State funds available for this purpose, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(School Department) 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
the Park and Recreation Commission Account No. A107-02, 400 New Programs, 
and determine in what manner the appropriation shall be met, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen 
to order street lights on Hearthstone Drive on the following named poles, 
#3, 5, 7 and 9, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen 
to order a street light for the following named pole, South Street pole no. 
21/49, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine the method by which the appropriation shall be met for the purpose 
of preparing a 201 facility plan update, as required by the Massachusetts 
Division of Water Pollution Control and the Environmental Protection Agency 
by mandate in the implementation schedule of the National Pollutant Dis- 
charge Elimination System Permit to study increased treatment and plant 
enlargement for (a) Medfield alone, and (b) Medfield, Millis and Cott flows 
combined, and to authorize the Water & Sewerage Board to enter into agree- 
ments with the State and Federal Governments for the purpose of accepting 
Federal and State grants or reimbursements therefor, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 



179 



And you are hereby directed to serve this Warrant by posting up attested 
copies thereof at five public places in said Town, fourteen days at least 
before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, with your doings 
thereon, to the Town Clerk at the time and place of the meeting, as afore- 
said. 

Given under our hands this 6th day of September in the year of our Lord 
one thousand nine hundred and seventy-seven. 



WilLLam R. R&agan 
R. Eduwid B^a/id 
SandAa G. MunAzy 

Selectmen of Medfield 



Norfolk, ss. September 12, 1977 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I have notified and warned the inha- 
bitants of the Town of Medfield by posting up attested copies of the same at 
eight public places, fourteen days before the date of the meeting, as direc- 
ted. 



Rob<mt V. Roy 
Constable of Medfield 



A true copy attest: 

Nancy J. PieAton 
Town Clerk 



180 






SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
Dale Street School 
September 26, 1977 



A motion was made and seconded to adjourn the meeting until Wednesday 
evening, September 28, 1977 at 7:30 P.M., since only 205 registered voters 
were in attendence and a quorum was not met. 



A true copy attest: 

Nancy J. PieAton 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
Dale Street School 
September 28, 1977 



Since the number of registered voters present was only 140 and a quorum 
was not met, the Moderator entertained a motion to dissolve the Warrant as 
it was apparent that voter interest in the Warrant was not sufficient. It 
was so moved and seconded. 






A true copy attest: 

Money J. PneAton 
Town Clerk 






181 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 

TOWNOFMEDFIELD 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1977 



183 



ASSESSORS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

The Board of Assessors, in submitting its annual report to the tax- 
payers of Medfield, is pleased to report that the first segment of the 
revaluation program, as authorized by the action of the last annual Town 
Meeting, is well under way. The new property record cards have been printed 
and all information pertaining to the individual parcels has been trans- 
ferred from the existing record cards. 

Two professional appraisers, Mr. Stan Bergeron and Mr. Allen Cook, are 
presently visiting each and every parcel in the field to verify that the 
information as recorded on the new cards is correct in every respect. They 
are also verifying all sales which have occurred within the past three years 
with the owners of properties concerned. Any alterations or additions that 
are observed by the appraisers, but are not recorded on our cards, will be 
immediately corrected and the owners will be notified in writing of any 
value change. 

After the appraisers have inspected the property, the owner, or the 
person allowing the inspection, is requested to sign the property record 
card so signifying that the buildings actually have been inspected. The 
owner's signature does not imply an acceptance of a future value. Notices 
will be mailed to all owners at a later time and hearings will be conducted 
to allow any property owner to discuss the new value with the Assessors. 

On several occasions, property owners have refused the appraisers the 
right to inspect the property. When this occurs, the Board of Assessors 
has no alternative but to estimate what it believes to exist on the inte- 
rior of the building involved and will base the final value conclusions on 
this estimate. 

In addition to the professional appraisers, a third person working 
under a CETA grant, namely Mr. Peter Lewicke, has photographed every struc- 
ture in the Town. The photographs will become part of the property record 
card and are used as a basis for comparison in the market value of each 
property, as well as to show pictorial evidence of the comparablility in 
the event a property value is in dispute and the case goes before the 

Appellate Tax Board. 

A request will be made for additional funds to implement the second 
phase of the revaluation program at the 1978 Annual Town Meeting. 

Our customary report follows: 

Appropriations 7,913,293.18 

Amount for Tax Title 320.00 

Total Offsets 19,477.63 



184 



Emergency Snow Removal 

State Assessments 

County Assessments 

Overlay 

Gross Amount to be raised 

Estimated Receipts and 
Available Funds 

Net Amount to be raised 

Real Property Valuations 

Personal Property Valuations 

Total Property Valuation 

Tax Rate 

Real Property Tax 

Personal Property Tax 

Total Taxes Levied on Property 

Water Betterments 

Sewer Betterments 

Water Liens 



38,695.22 

210,046.11 

256,208.19 

56,302.68 

2,906,273.94 

73,006,120.00 
2,001,425.00 

74.50 

5,438,962.86 

149,106.21 

4,637.96 
39,379.00 
17,945.18 



$7,971,786.03 



$8,494,343.01 



$5,588,069.07 



$75,007,545.00 



$5,588,069.07 



Respectfully submitted, 

RogeA E. HaAdy 
Jo6£pk S. Kmmdy 
MeZvUle. J. Mi£t6 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS OF MEDFIELD 



185 



REPORT OF COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 







7-1-76 








6-30-77 


TOTAL 


LEVY OF 




BALANCE 


- 


COLLECTED 




BALANCE 


BALANCE 


1970 




66.50 




2.00 




64.50 




1971 




78.38 




.00 




78.38 




1972 




341.32 




.00 




341.32 




1973 




302.08 




87.85 




214.23 




1974 




82.50 




55.00 




27.50 




1975 




412.56 




207.27 




205.29 




1976 


1 


,509.80 




741.05 




768.75 




1977 




— 


115 


,126.96 


1 


,396.63 


3,096.60 








REAL ESTATE TAXES 






1966 




8.00 




.00 




8.00 




1967 




56.55 




.00 




56.55 




1968 




83.07 




.00 




83.07 




1969 




806.78 




7.98 




798.80 




1970 


1 


,540.91 




9.03 


1 


,531.88 




1971 




268.10 




16.72 




251.38 




1972 


2 


,566.43 




142.74 


2 


,423.69 




1973 


3 


,831.17 




329.19 


3 


,501.98 




1974 


3 


,651.95 


1 


,687.25 


1 


,964.70 




1975 


17 


,142.85 


7 


,196.01 


9 


,946.84 




1976 


106 


,465.64 


78 


,321.12 


28 


,144.52 




1977 




— 


4,257 


,866.85 


116 


,170.75 


164,882.16 








WATER LIENS ADDED TO 


TAXES 






1967 




65.76 




65.76 




.00 




1969 




63.59 




63.59 




.00 




1970 




57.24 




57.24 




.00 




1973 




64.84 




.00 




64.84 




1975 




171.12 




.00 




171.12 




1976 




504.96 




330.18 




174.78 




1977 




— 


13 ; 


,451.65 


1 


,043.72 


1,454.46 








MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 


TAXES 






1970 




429.83 




89.93 




339.90 




1971 




147.95 




128.70 




19.25 




1972 




189.48 




57.48 




132.00 




1973 




328.63 




328.63 




.00 




1974 




853.14 




723.33 




129.81 




1975 


3 


,404.81 


2 


,658.76 




746.05 




1976 


105 


,165.37 


88 


, 044. 37 


17 


,121.00 




1977 




— 


78, 


,932.95 


169 


,179.95 


187,667.96 



186 



Total Interest collected on delinquent taxes 9,856.23 

Total fees collected for Certificate of Municipal Liens 2,438.00 

Total Demand fees collected 1,338.00 

This report is for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1977. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CkaAleA H. RayneA, Jfc. 
Collector of Taxes 



187 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

For the Period of July 1, 1976 - June 30, 1977 
RECEIPTS 



Balance Cash on Hand July 1, 
General 
Federal Revenue Sharing 



1976: 



$1,003,393.96 
249,546.73 



$1,252,940.69 



Taxes: 

Real Estate and Property Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Farm Animal Excise Tax 

Payments in Lieu of Taxes 

Abatements to Veterans, Widows 

Lottery 

State Tax - Local Aid 

Licenses and Permits: 

Alcoholic and Beverage 
Public Safety 
Inspection Department 

Court Fines 

Grants from State, County and Federal Govt: 
Federal Revenue Sharing 
Antirecession Revenue Sharing 
School Building Assistance 
Schools - Other 
Ambulance 

Hud Grant - Metacomet Park 
Highways 
Other 

Library Aid 
Dog Fund 
Gifts from Individuals 

Special Assessments: 
Water 
Sewer 



4,443,265.96 

360,353.18 

2.05 

180,073.00 

7,606.76 

51,408.75 

1,221,455.94 



5,040.00 

662.25 

20,445.70 



112,119.00 

14,719.00 

139,563.02 

189,271.69 

1,000.00 

15,000.00 

23,813.08 

31,166.58 

3,682.88 

1,494.40 

5,525.50 



5,177.15 
47,832.25 



26,147.95 
2,117.05 



537,355.15 



53,009.40 



Departmental Revenue: 
General Government 
Public Safety 
Health and Sanitation 



Highways 
Veterans 
School - 
School - 
Regional 
School - 
Library 
Recreation 



- State 

Services 

Sale of Lunches 

Athletic Account 

Vocational School 

Other 



36,477.08 
17,158.38 
21,723.94 
82,302.54 

4,063.89 
134,010.39 

5,286.75 
20,442.63 
23,659.29 

2,001.44 

1,488.15 



348,614.48 



188 



Unclassified: 

Conservation Escrow (Noon Hill) 



10,034.60 



Water Department: 

Sale of Water and Services 
Water Liens 

Cemetery 



100,377.90 
14,596.54 



114,974.44 
962.48 



Interest: 
Deposits 

Taxes and Assessments 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Investment Funds 
Library 
Cemetery 

Federal Revenue Sharing 
Special Assessments 



30,699.11 
9,277.34 
781.61 
7,109.03 
5,300.55 
5,297.80 

14,061.36 



74,058.82 



Loans: 

Anticipation Loans 
Police Station and Sewer 
Premium on Loans 

Agency and Trust Funds: 
Federal Withholding Tax 
State 

Group Insurance 

County and Teachers' Retirement 
Union Dues-Teachers and Custodians 
Teachers' Insurance and Credit Union 
Perpetual Care Funds 
G.A.R. Trust 
Robert Luke Trust 
Dog Licenses 



3,659,080.00 
609,700.00 

1,620.00 



654,295.34 

205,325.42 

96,856.99 

202,524.71 

21,015.50 

134,055.81 

2,990.00 

480.00 

1,678.40 

3,507.10 



4,270,400.00 



1,322,729.27 



Investment : 

Stabilization Fund 
Withdrawal Stabilization Fund 
Available Funds 



200,000.00 

52,000.00 

700,000.00 



952,000.00 



Refunds: 

General Government 

Schools 

Water 

Cemetery 

Accrued Interest 



32.00 
675.95 
792.00 
300.00 
871.94 



2,671.89 



Total Receipts and Cash on Hand 



$15,232,181.' 



189 



EXPENDITURES 7/1/76 - 6/30/77 

General Government: 

Selectmen $ 6,817.89 

Executive 110,771.13 

Accountant 9,780.75 

Treasurer 8,199.02 

Collector 8,630.57 

Assessors 15,424.83 

Town Clerk 6,671.60 

Town Counsel 8,710.37 

Elections & Registrations - 11,234.96 

Town Meeting 2,471.37 

Planning 8,227.12 

Warrant 70.00 

Appeals 1,489.87 

Personnel 547.30 

Bi-Centennial 8,416.51 

Town Hall 32,520.75 $ 239,984.04 

Public Safety: 

Police 529,654.34 

Fire 131,027.98 

Inspectors 16,119.58 

Sealer 341.00 

Tree & Insect 14,469.83 

School Traffic 12,581.50 

Dog 10,979.31 

Civil Defense 1,243.03 

Police Detail 10,431.14 

Ambulance 7,722.59 734,570.30 

Health and Sanitation: 

Public and Mental Health 19,622.52 

Outreach 9,000.00 

Sewers-Operation 93,643.80 

Sewer Project 734,489.90 

Garbage 19,000.00 

Sanitary Landfill 33,607.99 

Council on Aging 3,193.69 912,557.90 

Highways : 

Highways 236,951.68 

DPW Equipment 52,041.56 

Sidewalks 3,983.77 

Snow 107,626.34 

Street Lighting & Signals 29,138.61 

Town Garage 8,561.00 438,302.96 

Veterans' Services: 

Veterans' Administration 2,488.76 

Veterans' Benefits 3,119.50 5,608.26 



190 






Schools: 
Schools 
Cafeteria 

Athletic Association 
School - Special Articles 
Regional Vocational School 
Custodian Detail 
Titles I, II, III 
Vocational Education 
Adult Education 
School Planning and Building 



4,322,549.22 

193,047.35 

5,753.47 

68,495.96 

94,003.80 

3,429.59 

25,515.73 

11,123.14 

10,446.02 

70.00 



4,734,434.28 



Library: 

Library Administration 
Library - Federal Grant 
Library - Corning Grant 



44,123.69 
72.18 



45,399.56 



Water and Cemetery: 
Water 
Cemetery 



211,962.83 
17,290.02 



229,252.85 



Insurance: 

Group Insurance 
Vehicle Liability 
Workmen's Compensation 
Property and Liability 



94,258.79 
16,051.00 
29,382.00 
18,213.00 



157,904.79 



Town Debt: 

Temporary Anticipation Loans 
Maturing Debt 
Interest on Debt 



3,182,800.00 
431,000.00 
250,448.76 



3,864,248.76 



Miscellaneous: 

Parks and Recreation 
County Retirement 
Town Report 
Memorial Day 
Other 



185,956.89 

82,089.77 

4,992.34 

428.33 

1,641.09 



275,108.42 



Refunds: 

Taxes - Personnel and Real Estate 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
General Government 
Public Safety 
Special Assessments 



27,514.83 

9,299.99 

382.00 

45.00 

377.85 



37,619.67 



State and County Assessments: 

State Audit 39.12 

Parks and Reservations 35,749.35 

Mass. Bay Transit Authority 76,840.36 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 1,220.55 

Metropolitan Air Pollution Control 677.28 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 1,256.22 

County Tax 161,046.33 

County Hospital Assessment 18,671.23 

Mosquito Control 10,012.12 



305,512.56 



191 



Trust and Agency Funds: 
Dog Licenses - County 
Federal Withholding Taxes 
State Withholding Taxes 
Group Insurance 
Retirement Fund 
Annuities, Credit Union, Dues 
Meals Tax 

Perpetual Care Funds 
Tailings 



3,580.60 

654,295.34 

205,325.42 

95,656.30 

199,515.20 

162,882.68 

60.66 

2,990.00 

617.91 



1,324,924.11 



Investment: 

Available Funds 
Stabilization Funds 
Conservation Fund 



200,000.00 
207,109.03 



410,386.61 



Total Expenditures 
Balance at end of Year 
Balance at end of Year 



General 

Federal Revenue Sharing 



13,715,815.07 
1,411,389.70 



Total Expenditures and Cash on Hand 



$15,232,181.86 



192 



GENERAL LEDGER ACCOUNTS 
June 30, 1977 

ASSETS 



Cash in Banks and Office 

Accounts Receivable: 

Personal Property Taxes: 
Levy of 1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1975 
1976 
1977 






Special Taxes in Litigation 

Tax Titles and Possessions: 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 

Departmental Accounts Receivable: 
Ambulance 

Cemetery Care and Sale of Lots 
Police Off Duty Detail 



64.50 

78.38 

341.32 

71.73 

375.29 

768.75 

,396.63 



Real Estate Taxes: 






Levy of 1966 




8.00 


1967 




56.55 


1968 




83.07 


1969 




798.80 


1970 




1,531.88 


1971 




251.38 


1972 




2,423.69 


1973 




284.33 


1975 




14,805.62 


1976 




25,697.05 


1977 




114,712.05 


Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 




Levy of 1970 




339.90 


1971 




19.25 


1972 




132.00 


1974 




195.81 


1975 




771.27 


1976 




17,121.00 


1977 




169,226.13 


Special Assessments: 






Unapportioned Water 


Betterments 




Added to Taxes 


15,563.55 


Water Betterments: 






Levy of 1967 




54.24 


1970 




7,704.11 


1977 




28.19 


Committed Interest 




201.77 


Unapportioned Sewer 


Assessment 


484,248.04 



11,102.31 
525.25 



4,723.07 

5,281.00 

501.13 



$1,516,366.79 



3,096.60 



160,652.42 



187,805.36 



507,799.90 
3,983.38 

11,627.56 
10,505.20 



193 



Water: 

Liens Added to Taxes: 
Levy of 1973 

1974 

1976 

1977 

1978 
Water Services 



64.84 

288.84 

57.06 

1,032.44 

17,485.64 



20,681.21 



Sewer: 

Septic Waste Disposal Fees 
Sewer Usage Charge 

Aid to Sewer: 



820.00 
4,604.12 



5,424.12 
1,073,391.00 



Aid to Conservation: 
Federal 
State 



170,000.00 



556,400.00 



Loans Authorized: 

Smith Pumping Station 

Sewers 

Conservation (Noon Hill) 



1,400.00 
5,844,300.00 



6,717,150.00 



Unprovided for: 

Norfolk County Mosquito Control 
Land Takings 



1,697.12 
518.53 



2,215.65 



TOTAL ASSETS 



$10,777,099.19 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

Temporary Loans: 

In Anticipation of Federal and State Aided Projects: 



Sewer 
Conservation 



666,280.00 
556,400.00 



$ 1,222,680.00 



State and County Assessments: 
M.B.T.A. 

Metropolitan Air Pollution District 
State Parks and Reservations 
County Tax 
Chapter 766 



158.44 

28.77 

2,002.62 

8,806.68 

1,361.00 



12,357.71 



Payroll Deductions: 

County Retirement Plan 
Teachers Retirement 
Group Insurance 
School Annuities 



7,456.32 

32,613.49 

14,660.03 

30.00 



54,759.84 



Guarantee Deposits: 
Planning Board 



3,689.96 



Agency: 

County Dog Licenses 
Bicentennial Sales Tax 



642.45 
44.25 



686.90 



194 



Tailings: 

Unclaimed Checks 



4,363.76 



Trust Fund Income: 
Cemetery 
Library 
Luke Memorial Trust 

Federal Grants: 

Revenue Sharing Funds 
Titles I, II, III, IV, V 
Occupational Education 
Special Federal Grant: Ambulance 

Private Grants: 



17,515.41 
1,758.57 



119,696.09 
47,736.26 
11,945.00 



20,789.88 



180,377.35 
476.52 



Collections in Excess of Committments 
Sewer Permit Fees 
Water Rates 

Revolving Funds: 
School Cafeteria 
School Athletics 
Police Detail 
Custodian Detail 
Adult Education 

Appropriation Balances: 
Schools 
Conservation 
Water 
Sewer 
All Other 

Loans Authorized but Unissued 



25.00 
1,038.59 



10,799.38 

330.39 

519.31 

55.92 

840.70 



243,974.18 
104,184.37 
156,442.88 
98,223.48 
171,502.35 



1,063.59 



12,545.70 



774,327.26 
6,717,150.00 



Sale of Real Estate 

Receipts Reserved for Appropriations: 
Highway Road Machinery Fund 

Reserve Fund - Overlay Surplus 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 

Levy of 1973 

1975 

1976 

1977 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Special Assessment 

Tax Title and Possession 

Special Tax Revenue 

Departmental 

Water 

Sewer Revenue 

Aid to Sewer Revenue 
Surplus Revenue 



24,362.17 
4,785.00 
5,782.52 

13,859.58 



187,805.36 

507,799.90 

11,627.56 

3,983.38 

10,505.20 

19,642.62 

5,399.12 

407,111.00 



3,000.00 

498.50 
13,322.44 



48,789.27 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 



1,153,874.14 

552,346.37 
$10,777,099.19 



195 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 



PRINCIPAL 



Balance June 30, 1977 

Funds in Custody of Town Treasurer: 



$357,173.01 



Library: 

Granville F. Dailey Trust 

Clara S. Littledale Trust 

Library Trust Funds 

Library - Dailey Income Trust 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Stabilization Funds 
Conservation Fund 

Funds in Custody of Selectmen: 
Moses Ellis Post #117 G.A.R. 



89,271.70 
2,653.50 
9,000.00 
6,000.00 

94,770.00 

142,037.14 

5,437.93 



$ 8,002.74 



$349,170.27 
$ 8,002.74 



OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt 



$4,479,700.00 



Outside Debt Limit: 

Junior-Senior High School 
Dale Street School Addition 
Elementary (Intermediate) School 
Elm Street (Wheelock) School 
Sewer Project 
Sewers - Longmeadow 

Inside Debt Limit: 

Street Sewer Design - Longmeadow 
Sewers ( Charles River) 
Noon Hill Land Acquisition 
Police Station Construction 



$ 225,000.00 

150,000.00 

710,000.00 

1,020,000.00 

1,475,000.00 

325,000.00 



30,000.00 

9,700.00 

260,000.00 

275,000.00 



$3,905,000.00 



$ 574,700.00 



The foregoing report is an account of the financial transactions and 
standing of the Town of Medfield for the twelve month fiscal period ending 
June 30, 1977. 

Wioka.eJL J. SuJUUvan 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



196 



REPORT OF TOWN TREASURER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



STATEMENT OF CASH 

Cash in Banks December 31, 1976 - Available Funds $ 1,443,049.22 

Escrowed Funds 442,059.03 

Receipts 1977 - including investments 13,820,779.39 

Disbursements 1977 - including investments ( 14,153,577. 14 ) 



Cash in Banks December 31, 1977 



Available Funds 
Escrowed Funds 



Total Cash December 31, 1977 - Including Savings & 

Investments 



$ 1,278,638.60 
273,671.90 

$ 1,552,310.50 



STATEMENT OF SAVINGS /INVESTMENTS 

$ 
Savings 
Total Savings /Investments December 31, 1977 



Available Funds - Savings 
Stabilization Funds - Savings 
Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 



202,109.06 
146,801.22 
125,870.68 



STATEMENT OF INTEREST EARNED ON SAVINGS /INVESTMENTS 



474,780.96 



Available Funds 
Stabilization Funds 
Sewer Project Funds 
Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 



28,622.14 

9,026.83 

660.65 

9,610.39 



Interest earned and received 1977 
Interest earned but not received 1977 

Total Interest Earned 1977 

STATEMENT OF FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING FUNDS 



47,920.01 
1,658.41 



49,578.42 



Cash in Banks December 31, 1976 
Distribution received 1977 
Interest received on Savings 1977 

Total Revenue Sharing Funds 1977 

Transferred to Articles 13, 14, 19, 37, 44 
Voted Annual Town Meeting April 1977 

Transferred to Articles 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 
Voted Special Town Meeting April 1977 

Cash in Banks December 31, 1977 



17 



237,861.29 
151,279.00 



(57,030.00) 



398,750.68 



(214,850.00 ) (271,880.00) 

1,000.00 
125,870.68 126,870.68 






197 



STATEMENT OF ANTIRECESSION REVENUE SHARING FUNDS 

First Distribution received November 22, 1976 $ 14,069.00 
Final Distribution received April 11, 1977 650.00 

Total Distributions received to December 31, 1977 $ 14,719.00 

Transferred to Articles 3 and 24 - Voted 

Annual Town Meeting April 1977 (14,719.00 ) 

Balance December 31, 1977 $ 0.00 

The cash position of the Town of Medfield on December 31, 1977 was down 
from the figure on December 31, 1976. This was in part due to the fact that 
we had to pay off temporary borrowing in the amount of $556,400 for the 
purchase of the Conservation Land on Noon Hill. The amount is fully re- 
imburseable by Federal and State Governments, but it had not been received 
at year-end 1977. 

In addition the cash position was further affected by the Town Meeting 
vote to spend $271,880 of Revenue Sharing funds. Interest earned was re- 
duced slightly over last year as a result of lesser investable funds during 
the year and stabilized interest rates. 

Again I am pleased to report that we have not borrowed in anticipation of 
revenue since July 11, 1973. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edmnd F. Bawi&tt, 3n. 
Town Treasurer 



198 



CONTRACTS FOR PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



Department 
or Board 

Assessors 



Purpose 

Updating 
Tax Maps 



Consultant 

Wayne C. Carlson 
88 Dover Road 
Millis, MA 



Amount 

New parcels 
$3.80 each; 
changes , 
$1.50 each. 



Assessors 



Appraisal 
Consultant 
for property 
inventory 



Stanley Bergeron 
9 Goodwin Road 
Jamaica Plain, MA 



Residential 
parcels, 
$3.50 each; 
commercial 
and small 
industrial, 
$7.00 each; 
large 

industrial 
complex, 
$300. each; 
all exempt 
property, 
$4,000, 
total; all 
vacant land 
$4,000 total , 



Assessors 



Updating new 
properties and 
building permits 



Assessors Tax Billing 



Health Consulting sanitary 
engineer 



Allen H. Cook 

28 Procter Avenue 

Hopkinton, MA 



Municipal Computer Service 
90 South Street, Suite 19 
Hingham, MA 02043 

William R. Domey 

52 Sherman Bridges Rd. 

Wayland, MA 01778 



Same con- 
tract as 
above; cost 
will depend 
on amount 
of building 
permits. 

$3,300. 



$5,800, 






Health Outreach worker 
furnishing youth 
counseling and 
outreach health 
service and home- 
making services 



Medfield Committee, 
P. 0. Box 225 
Medfield, MA 



Inc. 



$12,500, 






199 



Department 
or Board 

Park and 

Recreation 

Commission 



Purpose 

Swim pond testing & 
consulting and 
lab fees for same 



Consultant Amount 

Carr Research Lab, Inc. $1,709, 
1717 Waban Street 
Wellesley, MA 02181 



School 



Architectural 
services in 
connection with 
repairs to roof 



Rich, Lang & Cote, Inc. 
1029 Chestnut Street 
Newton Upper Falls, MA 



$1,200, 



School Developing 

standard painting 
specifications 



Hauser & Keefer Architects 
171 Larch Road 
Cambridge, MA 



$ 700, 



School *Legal Consultation 
for the Medfield 
School Committee 



Morgan, Brown, Kearns $35. - $50 
and Joy, Attorneys per hour 



*No contract involved; 
services engaged. 



Town Clerk 


Street List and 
Voter List 


L. H. S. Associates 
Dundee Park 
Andover, MA 


$.20 per 
name 


Water & 
Sewerage 


Sewer Betterment 
Drawings 


Weston & Sampson 
10 High Street 
Boston, MA 


$25,000. 


Water & 
Sewerage 


Engineering for 
Mt. Nebo Standpipe 


Bethel, Duncan & 
O'Rourke, Inc. 
41 Second Street 
Burlington, MA 


$18,900. 



The above information is printed in accordance with Article II, Section 
of the Town of Medfield By-laws. These contracts will be made available for 
review upon request. 



200 



PERPETUAL CARE 



Robert & Laura Ahern $100.00 

Gerald & Beatrice Bangs $200.00 

Ray C. Blanchard $400.00 

James & Belle Burgess $200.00 

William & Lillian Capocci $200.00 

Hazel Cunningham $100.00 

Joseph & Jessie Erskine $200.00 

Benjamin & Marie Greely $400.00 

Norman Grey $400.00 

Donald Howlett $100.00 

Mary Jennings $ 10.00 

Robert & Ruth Luke $200.00 

Donald & Nancy Mailing $400.00 

Walter & Margaret Marr $400.00 

Eric & Alfhild Mattson $400.00 

Gustaf & Christine Mattson $800.00 

Howard Powers $180.00 

Thomas & Edith Sheridan $300.00 

Bruce Simpson $400.00 

Richard & Helen Smallwood $ 50.00 

Philip & Irene Szylkonis $400.00 

Constance Waite $400.00 

Wilfred & Helen Wills $400.00 

Robert & Kathryn Zabe $400.00 



201 



TOWNOFMEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings : 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the in- 
habitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in 
town affairs, to meet at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Monday, 
the twenty-seventh day of March, A.D., 1978, at 6:00 a.m., then and there to 
act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually 
by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator for one year; 

One Selectman, one Assessor, two members of the School Committee, 
two Trustees of the Public Library, one Treasurer, three Park 
Commissioners, all for three years; 

One member of the Housing Authority for two years ; 

One member of the Planning Board and one member of the Housing 
Authority, both for five years. 

The polls will be open at 6:00 a.m. and shall be closed an 8:00 p.m. 

On Monday, the twenty-fourth day of April, A.D., 1978, commencing at 7:30 
p.m., the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury 
School gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the 
several Town Officers for the past year. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer from 
available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other Town 
Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray operating expenses of the 
Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1978, or such other sums as the 
Town may determine as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer with 
the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in antici- 
pation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1978, in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and 
to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in accord- 
ance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 



202 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all means 
in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to that office. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation 
of the following elected officers: 

Moderator 

Town Clerk 

Treasurer 

Selectmen 

Assessors 

School Committee 

Trustees of Public Library 

Collector of Taxes 

Park and Recreation Commission 

Planning Board 

Housing Authority 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administra- 
tion Plan, effective July 1, 1978, to read as follows: 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

SALARIED POSITIONS 



Police Department 


Minimum 


2nd 


Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


Police Chief 
Police Sergeant 
Police Officer 
Dog Officer 


$16,080. 
14,264. 
11,608. 
10,034. 


14 , 
12, 


,858. 
,423. 


13, 


,377. 






$21,398, 
15,605, 
14,264, 
10,935 


Streets, Water and Sewer 


Department 
















Superintendent 


17,367. 














23,156, 


Fire Department 


















Chief 


13,913. 














17,888. 


Executive Department 


















Executive Secretary 
Administrative Assistant 


16,724. 
9,000. 














25,728, 
13,000. 


Library 


















Librarian 
Asst. Librarian 
Children's Librarian 


7,448. 
3,843. 
4,803. 


7, 
4, 
5, 


,884. 
,055. 
,068. 


8, 
4, 
5, 


268 

287. 

358. 


8, 
4, 
5, 


679. 
524. 
655. 


9,275. 
4,770. 
5,963. 



203 



HOURLY POSITIONS 

Listed below is a 12-grade, 5-step hourly structure, in which all hourly 
graded positions are slotted. 



Grade 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 



GRADE 1 

May be paid minimum wage 
Swimming Instructor (PTT) 
Lifeguard Instructor (PTT) 

$728. minimum per season 
Library Aide (PTT) 
Playground Counselor (PTT) 
Lifeguard (PTT) 

$606. minimum per season 
Laborer Intern (PTT) 
Laborer (PTT) 

GRADE 2 
Presently no jobs 



Minimum 


2nd Step 3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


2.64 


2.79 


2.94 


3.07 


3.24 


2.88 


3.03 


3.18 


3.33 


3.48 


3.12 


3.24 


3.38 


3.57 


3.78 


3.38 


3.52 


3.64 


3.85 


4.09 


3.45 


3.64 


3.85 


4.04 . 


4.24 


3.52 


3.78 


3.99 


4.18 


4.52 


3.99 


4.24 


4.52 


4.77 


5.02 


4.43 


4.72 


4.97 


5.23 


5.57 


4.72 


4.97 


5.23 


5.57 


5.88 


4.97 


5.23 


5.49 


5.83 


6.17 


5.09 


5.44 


5.77 


6.10 


6,43 


5.44 


5.77 


6.10 


6.43 


6.82 


HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 








Part Time/Temporary - 


(PTT) 






Regular - 


■ (R) 










GRADE 7 







Senior Secretary (R) 
Truck Driver (PTT) 
Special Police Officer (PTT) 
Permanent Intermittent (PTT) 
Call Firefighters (PTT) 
Ambulance E.M.T. (PTT) 

GRADE 8 

Light Equipment Operator (R) 
Municipal Buildings Custodian (R) 
Senior Accounts Clerk 



GRADE 3 



GRADE 9 



Clerk Typist (PTT) 
Library Sr. Aide (PTT) 
Cemetery Foreman (PTT) 

GRADE 4 

Skilled Laborer (R) 
Secretary (PTT) 

GRADE 5 

Collector /Bookkeeper /Secretary (R) 

GRADE 6 

Police Matron (PTT) 
Skating Supervisor (PTT) 
Traffic Supervisor (PTT) 



Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Operator (R) 
Heavy Equipment Operator (R) 
Water Technician (R) 

GRADE 10 

Equipment Operator Repairman (R) 
Assistant Wastewater Treatment 
Plant Operator-in-Charge (R) 

GRADE 11 

Tree Warden/insect Pest Control (PTT) 

GRADE 12 

Street/Water/Sewer Foreman (R) 
Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Operator-in-Charge (R) 



204 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 
Part Time/Temporary 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Asst. Waterfront Director 
Deputy Collector 
Asst. Dog Officer 

Ambulance Serviceman 

Fire 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Playground Director 

Police Intern 

Poll Worker 

Recreation Coordinator 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights/Measures 

Town Counsel 

Tree Climber 

Veterans' Agent 

Inspectors 
Building Inspector 
Acting Building Inspector 
Gas Inspector 
Acting Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Acting Plumbing Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Acting Wiring Inspector 
Health Agent 
Street Inspector 
Zoning Enforcing Officer 



$553 per year 

$1,577 to $2,059 per year 

$98 to $135 per week, $849 min. per 

Fee season 

$243 per year and $4.52 per hr. when on 

duty 
$3.22 per run, subject to $31. min. per mo. 



$838 per year 
$281 per year 
$213 per year 
$213 per year 



$109 to $166 per week 

$120 to $157 per week 

$3.15 per hr. 

$80 to $98 per week 

$161 per year 

$386 per year 

$271 per year 

$3,191 to $7,975 per year 

$3.45 to $5.57 per hr. 

$2,000 per year 

$7.97 per inspection 
Annual minimum $1,543 
Annual minimum $206 
Annual minimum $426 
Annual minimum $77 
Annual minimum $1,261 
Annual minimum $289 
Annual minimum $701 
Annual minimum $206 
$7.97 per inspection 
$4.19 per hour 
$7.97 per inspection 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification of Posi- 
tions and Pay Schedule of the Personnel Administration Plan by adding the 
following position under Full Time: 



SALARIED POSITIONS 
Board of Health 



Minimum 



Detached Social Worker $11,500. 

or to take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Health) 



Maximum 



$14,500. 



205 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds, a sum of money for the purpose of purchasing 
and installing a radio console in the police station on North Street, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Police Department) 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner it will be raised for the purpose of purchasing a 
copying machine for the Memorial Public Library, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto, 

(Memorial Public Library Trustees) 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money and determine 
in what manner said sum will be raised for the purpose of conducting an audit 
of town finances including Federal Revenue Sharing Funds and Federal Anti- 
Recession Revenue Sharing Funds, or take any other action relating thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to establish special funds for 
retirement purposes in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 5D 
of the General Laws for funding of the town's share of the contributory retire- 
ment system, and further to see if the town will appropriate a sum of money to 
said fund and determine in what manner said money shall be raised, or take any 
other action relating thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner it shall be raised for the purpose of purchasing 
equipment for the Street Department and Park Department as listed, and authorize 
the Selectmen to trade, as part of the purchase price, equipment to be replaced: 



To 


be Acquired 


Department 
Street 


Trade 


1. 


Backhoe 


1968 . 


2. 


Truck Chassis 


Street 


1965 : 


3. 


Two (2) Snow Plows 


Street 


None 


4. 


Compactor 


Street 


None 


5. 


Riding Mower 


Park 


None 


6. 


Lime Spreader 


Park 


None 



1968 John Deere Backhoe 

International Chassis 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water & Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of designing a bridge to replace Upper Bridge on Orchard 
Street; said money to be used in conjunction with funds appropriated by the 
Town of Millis for this purpose, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water & Sewer Department) 



206 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for flooring and electrical wiring of salt storage shed to be provided 
to the Town by the Massachusetts Department of Public Works, or do or act any- 
thing in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water & Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate Fourteen 
Thousand Dollars ($14,000.) for the purpose of resurfacing North Street between 
Farm Street and Harding Street, a distance of approximately 4400 feet, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water & Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds the sum of Thirteen Thousand, Nine Hundred 
Eighty-nine Dollars ($13,989.) to be used in conjunction with funds allotted 
by the State for the purpose of constructing South Street between High Street 
and the Norfolk Town line and to authorize the Selectmen to enter into any 
and all contracts and agreements necessary for accomplishing said project, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Streets, Water & Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-laws of the Town of 
Medfield, Article I. Town Meetings, Section 4., paragraph 2 as follows: 

"The number of voters necessary to constitute a quorum at 
any Town Meeting shall be one hundred and fifty (150) pro- 
vided that a number less than a quorum may from time to time 
adjourn the same. This section shall not apply to parts of 
meetings as are devoted exclusively to the election of Town 
Officers." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner it will be raised for the purchase of a 1% to 2 ton 
capacity truck chassis and cab for the Tree Department and to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to sell or trade the 1971 International Truck Chassis and 
Cab as part of the purchase price, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Tree Department) 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $44,627. from the 
unexpended balance of article 15, 1970 special town meeting to meet a portion 
of the amount voted in article 23, 1977 annual town meeting; and appropriate 
$68,632. from the unexpended balance of article 15, 1970 special town meeting 
to meet a portion of the amount voted in article 9, 1976 special town meet- 
ing for the purpose of constructing sanitary sewers in the Town of Medfield, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 



207 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
for laying 2200' of 12" water main in a private way known as Hummingbrrd 
Lane and in Granite Street and 900' of 8" water main in Lakewood Drive and 
Stagecoach Road, to determine whether such appropriation shall be rarsed by 
borrowing or otherwise, to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acqurre by 
eminent domain or otherwise such rights, titles and easements as may be^ 
necessary to accomplish such purposes, or to take any other actron in re 
lation thereto. 

(Water & Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available -funds 
and/or borrow a sum of money for the purpose of making a water reconnaissance 
survey by means of test wells and making a prolonged pumping test by means of 
an 8" test well in the Mine Brook area in order to find and get State approval 
of a potable water supply, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
the construction of a water standpipe on town-owned land on Mt. Nebo, for 
laying approximately 3000 feet of 12" water main in Philip Street, including 
acquisition of a right of way extending from Philip Street to the standpipe 
and all necessary appurtenances, and for laying a 12" water main from the 
standpipe to Main Street, a distance of approximately 3000 feet; to de- 
termine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise, 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or other- 
wise such rights, titles and easements as may be necessary to accomplish 
such purposes, or to take any other action relative thereto. 

(Water & Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 83, Sections 16A to 
16F of the General Laws which provide that unpaid sewer charges shall be a lien 
upon the real estate that received the benefit of the sewer services, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Regulation Relative to 
Sewer Assessments by adding a paragraph to Section 6. as follows: 

"Whenever Multi-family dwellings are constructed on property 
previously assessed, a connection charge shall be made equal 
in amount to the number of units constructed, less any units 
previously assessed, the amount of said unit charges to be 
equal to the unit charges assessed for the most recent common 
sewer extension installed in the Town." 

or take any action relative thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 



208 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine the method by which the appropriation will be met for the purpose 
of preparing a 201 sewer facility plan update, as required by the Massachusetts 
Division of Water Pollution Control and the Environmental Protection Agency by 
mandate in the implementation schedule of the National Pollutant Discharge 
Elimination System Permit, to study increased treatment and plant enlargement 
for (a) Medfield alone, and (b) Medfield, Millis and Cott Corporation flows 
combined, and to authorize the Water and Sewerage Board to enter into agree- 
ments with the State and Federal Governments for the purpose of accepting 
Federal and State grants or reimbursements therefor, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of providing 
recreation for the physically and mentally handicapped, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the funds shall be raised to provide for payment of a 
prior fiscal year bill for the School Department Account No. 4000-00, 200 
Operations, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of making 
improvements to the Medfield Town Hall, or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to permit 
Shell Oil Company, Incorporated to relocate its high pressure transmission line 
in North Meadows Road and to grant an easement on Town land in exchange for a 
release of its present easement on said land, the easement to be fifty feet 
in width and bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on North Meadows Road approximately 430 feet 
southeasterly of West Street and proceeding northeasterly along the 
northwesterly property line of Lot 32 as shown on Plan 48 of the 
Assessors' Plan for an approximate distance of 190 feet and then 
along the northwesterly property line of Lot 27 as shown on Plan 48 
of the Assessors' Plans for a distance of approximately 520 feet 
and on a curve northeasterly to West Street an approximate distance 
of 430 feet, 

or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



209 



ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Chapter 44, Section 53D of the General Laws authorizing the establishment of a 
revolving fund in which shall be deposited receipts received in connection with 
the conduct of self-supporting recreation and park services of the Town, to 
be expended at the direction of the Park and Recreation Commission only for 
the purpose of operating self-supporting recreation and park services; said 
revolving fund shall not be used to employ or pay the salary of any employee 
or for the purchase of equipment; or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Park & Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
the construction of municipal outdoor recreational and athletic facilities 
on town-owned land off Hospital Road, including the development of said land; 
to determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or 
otherwise, or to take any other action relative thereto. 

(Park & Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose of paving the 
parking lot at Metacomet Park, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
extraordinary repairs to the roofs of the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 
and the Memorial Elementary School, and determine in what manner such sum 
shall be raised, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote \o appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said money shall^be raised for the purpose of con- 
ducting an outdoor training and development program, or take any other action 
relating thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose 
of conducting a computer assisted tax equalization program as the second 
phase of the current on-going revaluation program, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and/or the Conservation Commission to convey to the United States of America 
the land owned by the Town within the Charles River Natural Valley Storage 
Project area for a minimum of one dollar or for an amount or amounts determined 
by a qualified real estate appraiser, whichever is larger, upon such terms as 
the Board of Selectmen and/or Conservation Commission shall consider proper, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



210 



ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 808 of the Acts of. 
1975 and to revise the Zoning By-law to conform with the provisions of 
Chapter 40A, The Zoning Act , as inserted in the General Laws by said Chapter 
808 in accordance with amendments proposed by the Planning Board and on file 
with said Board; and vote to increase the area requirements for apartments, 
to allow use by special permit for rehabilitation of the handicapped, to 
permit replacement of non-conforming signs, and to realign and clarify certain 
language in the Zoning By-law, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Map of the 
Town of Medfield by removing from the RS - Residential Suburban District and 
placing in the B - Business District a certain parcel of land containing 
1.79 acres, more or less belonging to John Basile, Jr. and George H. Basile 
on North Meadows Road shown as Lot B on a plan drawn for said owners dated 
October 20, 1977 by Guerriere and Halnon, Inc. and bounded and described as 
follows: 

Beginning at the northerly corner of the premises at a concrete 
bound on said southwesterly side of said North Meadows Road as laid 
out by the Massachusetts Department of Public Works in 1972 and at 
land, now or formerly, of the Robert H. Palson Estate; thence 

S-48-06-35-E by said Road a distance of 220.00 feet to other 

land of said John Basile, Jr. and George H. Basile; 
thence 

S-31-12-38-W by last named land a distance of 188.23 feet to a 
concrete bound at land, now or formerly, of 
George E. Noonan and Phyllis R. Noonan; thence 

S-33-44-51-W by last named land a distance of 97.22 feet to a 
concrete bound at Lot A on said plan; thence 

S-69-30-50-W by said Lot A on said plan a distance of 61.64 feet 
to land, now or formerly, of Alfred J. Ouellette and 
Joan M. Ouellette; thence 

N-20-29-10-W a distance of 130.00 feet to a point; thence 

N-42-29-10-W a distance of 174.82 feet to a concrete bound at 

said Palson Estate; the last two lines bounding on 
said Ouellette; thence 

N-49-04-45-E a distance of 128.23 feet to a concrete bound at the 
end of a stone wall; thence 

N-62-49-43-E along said wall a distance of 110.74 feet to an iron 
pin in the end of said wall; thence 

N-28-39-25-E a distance of 28.55 feet to the point of beginning; the 
last three lines bounding on said Palson Estate. 

or take any action relative thereto. 

(Planning Board) 



211 



ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the follow- 
ing named streets, or parts thereof: 

Lakewood Terrace from Station 0+26. 84 to Station 2+90.21 
Mohawk Street from Station 0+0 to 6+01.17 

The Paddock Lane from Station 19+46.35 to Station 21+32.00 
Penobscot Street from Station 0+0 to 5+07.47 



as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in 
the Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights 
titles and easements, including drainage easements as may be necessary to 
accomplish such purposes, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen 
to order street lights on Hearthstone Drive on the following named poles, 
#3, 5, 7 and 9, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen to 
order a street light for the following named pole, South Street Pole No. 21/49, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors 
to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
Tax Rate, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 



212 



ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named sums 
as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the 
interest thereof or as may be necessary for said care, viz: 

Robert & Laura Ahern $100. 

Gerald & Beatrice Bangs 200. 

Ray C. Blanchard 400. 

James & Belle Burgess 200. 

William & Lillian Capocci 200. 

Hazel Cunningham 100. 

Joseph & Jessie Erskine 200. 

Benjamin & Marie Greely 400. 

Norman Gray 400. 

Donald Howlett 100. 

Mary Jennings 10. 

Robert & Ruth Luke 200. 

Donald & Nancy Mailing 400. 

Walter & Margaret Marr 400. 

Eric & Alfhild Mattson 400. 

Gustaf & Christine Mattson 800. 

Howard Powers 180. 

Thomas & Edith Sheridan 300. 

Bruce Simpson 400. 

Richard & Helen Smallwood 50. 

Philip & Irene Szylkonis 400. 

Constance Waite 400. 

Wilfred & Helen Wills 400. 

Robert & Kathryn Zabe 400. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days 
at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings 
thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this twenty-eighth day of February, A.D., Nineteen 
Hundred and Seventy-eight. 

WWUum R. Reagan, CkcUAmcm 
R. EdwaAd Bz.aAd, ClVtk 
SandJia. G. Uiimzy 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



213 



INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers Elected 4 

APPOINTMENTS BY: 

Fire Chief 16 

Board of Health 14 

Planning Board '. . . . 15 

Moderator 14 

Board of Selectmen 6 

Tax Collector 16 

Town Clerk 16 

Treasurer 16 

DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Aging, Council on 76 

Ambulance Department 40 

Animal Inspector 77 

Appeals on Zoning , Board of 51 

Building Code Board of Appeals 72 

Central Business District Study Committee 84 

Civil Defense Department , 41 

Community Gardens Committee 72 

Conservation Commission 60 

Development and Industrial Commission 82 

Dog Officer 74 

Fire Department 29 

Health, Board of 63 

Historic District Study Committee 91 

Historical Commission 86 

Housing Authority 57 

Inspection Department 79 

Jury List 94 

Library Trustees f 55 

Master Plan Implementation Committee 50 

Memorial Public Library 53 

Mental Health and Retardation Area Board 67 

Mosquito Control, Norfolk County 68 

Park and Recreation Commission '. 71 

Planning Board 46 

Police Department 32 

Police Station Study Committee 39 

Sealer of Weights and Measures , 81 

Selectmen , Board of 18 

Streets , Water and Sewer Department 25 

Tree Warden 69 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School 92 

Veterans ' Services , 75 

Water and Sewerage Department , 42 

Youth Advisory Commission 73 



214 



INDEX 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORTS: Page 

Adult Education 120 

Amos Clark Kingsbury School 110 

Athletic Director 121 

Buildings and Grounds Director 124 

Business Manager 119 

Dale Street School 104 

Ralph Wheelock School 106 

Junior High School 108 

Graduation Exercises , High School 112 

Media Services , Director of 117 

Memorial Elementary School 103 

School Committee 98 

School Lunch Program 122 

Special Services , Director of 115 

Superintendent of Schools . 100 

TOWN CLERK'S RECORDS: 

Births 128 

Marriages 131 

Deaths 136 

TOWN MEETINGS AND ELECTIONS: 

Annual Town Election, March 28, 1977 139 

Warrant and Proceedings, Annual Town Meeting, April 25, 1977 143 

Warrant and Proceedings, Special Town Meeting, April 26, 1977 170 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting 1978 202 

FINANCIAL REPORTS: 

Assessor s ' Report 184 

Contracts for Professional Services 199 

Perpetual Care 201 

Tax Collector 186 

Town Accountant 188 

Treasurer 197 



215 




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